Hardware is 83c a little too toasty

Dominator211

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I just ran an XTU stress test for the hell of it on my i7 5500u and when the CPU stress test was finished the highest temp reading was at 83C and this translates into 183F which is hot but not as hot as the CPU will get on the die. (100C or past boiling point of water) I do have an external fan... I did not experience any thermal throttling but I did experience power throttling which makes me think the board is not letting the electrical current through but I'm not too sure... anyway I'm not sure if I
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should do anything about this or not... any help will be appreciated...
 

Dominator211

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What are the idle temps? Idle is the teller of something could be seriously wrong. But, 83C is sort of high..even for a stress test.
the average is 59c according it XTU and this is only with a few chrome tabs open

Come to think of it i think the fans have been on higher more than usual

right now its running anywhere from 44 -50C
 
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TheTechGenius

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Don't worry about translating the temps into Farenhight. PC hardware has a higher tolerance then normal electronics, that's why all PC temps are in Celsius.

If your doing a Stress Test on your CPU or GPU, then the point is to see the worst case scenario of the temp of your CPU/GPU.

So 83c in a Stress Test for a CPU is actually very normal on a Air Cooled CPU.

There is a MAX temp rated for all CPU's by the manufacturer, it's called "TJMax".

The TJMax for most CPU's is around 95c to 100c.

83c is very normal for an air cooled CPU. I would be very worried if you were getting 83c on a water cooled CPU, even in a Stress Test. But like I said, 83c is very normal for an air cooled CPU while running a Stress Test.

If your really worried, why not repaste the CPU with fresh thermal paste? Unless your on a laptop.
 

The Real Jdbye

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I just ran an XTU stress test for the hell of it on my i7 5500u and when the CPU stress test was finished the highest temp reading was at 83C and this translates into 183F which is hot but not as hot as the CPU will get on the die. (100C or past boiling point of water) I do have an external fan... I did not experience any thermal throttling but I did experience power throttling which makes me think the board is not letting the electrical current through but I'm not too sure... anyway I'm not sure if IView attachment 107722 should do anything about this or not... any help will be appreciated...
You have a 5500U, that's why it power throttles. It will throttle to try to stay below TDP, and those CPUs have a pretty low TDP. You can use ThrottleStop to try to prevent that but in my experience it won't always work.

83C is pretty high for a desktop, but it looks like you're on a laptop, and those normally run hotter due to cooling constraints, so I wouldn't worry. Either way it's not hot enough to kill a CPU, might have a small effect on the expected lifetime but it will probably die of other causes or simply go unused before the CPU dies.
Don't worry about translating the temps into Farenhight. PC hardware has a higher tolerance then normal electronics, that's why all PC temps are in Celsius.

If your doing a Stress Test on your CPU or GPU, then the point is to see the worst case scenario of the temp of your CPU/GPU.

So 83c in a Stress Test for a CPU is actually very normal on a Air Cooled CPU.

There is a MAX temp rated for all CPU's by the manufacturer, it's called "TJMax".

The TJMax for most CPU's is around 95c to 100c.

83c is very normal for an air cooled CPU. I would be very worried if you were getting 83c on a water cooled CPU, even in a Stress Test. But like I said, 83c is very normal for an air cooled CPU while running a Stress Test.

If your really worried, why not repaste the CPU with fresh thermal paste? Unless your on a laptop.
If this was a desktop CPU running at stock speeds then 83C would be worringly high. Not because it will damage the CPU, but because it's a sign that something is not right with the cooling. For example, my i7 920 got up to about 76C when stress testing with the stock cooler, and that's a 130W TDP CPU. Newer CPUs run cooler since they are far more efficient. Even the high-end i7 8700K only has a 95W TDP. So having those kind of temps on any recent or semi-recent Intel CPU on a desktop would be a sign that either the cooler needs to be cleaned, the fan needs to be replaced or the thermal paste needs reapplying. Or someone just did an awful job with cable management.
On a laptop like he seems to be on though, it's a lot more normal. It's hardly optimal, but decent cooling on laptops is often sacrificed for portability.
 
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You have a 5500U, that's why it power throttles. It will throttle to try to stay below TDP, and those CPUs have a pretty low TDP. You can use ThrottleStop to try to prevent that but in my experience it won't always work.

83C is pretty high for a desktop, but it looks like you're on a laptop, and those normally run hotter due to cooling constraints, so I wouldn't worry. Either way it's not hot enough to kill a CPU, might have a small effect on the expected lifetime but it will probably die of other causes or simply go unused before the CPU dies.

If this was a desktop CPU running at stock speeds then 83C would be worringly high. Not because it will damage the CPU, but because it's a sign that something is not right with the cooling. For example, my i7 920 got up to about 76C with the stock cooler, and that's a 130W TDP CPU. Newer CPUs run cooler since they are far more efficient. Even the high-end i7 8700K only has a 95W TDP. So having those kind of temps on any recent or semi-recent Intel CPU on a desktop would be a sign that either the cooler needs to be cleaned, the fan needs to be replaced or the thermal paste needs reapplying. Or someone just did an awful job with cable management.
On a laptop like he seems to be on though, it's a lot more normal. It's hardly optimal, but decent cooling on laptops is often sacrificed for portability.
It may be high for any normal use. But he's running a Stress Test. A stress test is designed to stress the CPU to 100% usage (depending on the test). If the CPU gets to 83c as it's max temp during a Stress test, then it's perfectly fine, and normal, even on a desktop. If it's air cooled anyway.

If he was getting 83c with normal every day use, or gaming, then that is a sign that something is wrong somewhere.

But getting 83c as a MAX temp in a stress test is perfectly normal with an air cooled CPU.

Trust me, I built many gaming computers, and Overclocked a lot of i7 CPU's. To make sure the overclock is stable, I always ran a Stress test to pin the CPU at 100% for about an hour or two at a time, sometimes longer.
 

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...that makes absolutely no sense at all!
Really? It doesn't make sense to you?

You should do your research before you comment on something you know nothing about.

What happens when your Mobile phone gets to about 85c to 90c?

The iPhone 5S can withstand temps up to 113F. A PC CPU can work perfectly fine at 85c/185F. At 85c the iPhone 5S would probably start melting. lol.

So yes, PC hardware has a higher tolerance then other electronics.

Server grade hardware has even a higher tolerance then normal PC hardware.
 
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The Real Jdbye

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It may be high for any normal use. But he's running a Stress Test. A stress test is designed to stress the CPU to 100% usage (depending on the test). If the CPU gets to 83c as it's max temp during a Stress test, then it's perfectly fine, and normal, even on a desktop. If it's air cooled anyway.

If he was getting 83c with normal every day use, or gaming, then that is a sign that something is wrong somewhere.

But getting 83c as a MAX temp in a stress test is perfectly normal with an air cooled CPU.

Trust me, I built many gaming computers, and Overclocked a lot of i7 CPU's. To make sure the overclock is stable, I always ran a Stress test to pin the CPU at 100% for about an hour or two at a time, sometimes longer.
Oh, I forgot to mention, that 76C was when stress testing with Prime95.
 

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You have a 5500U, that's why it power throttles. It will throttle to try to stay below TDP, and those CPUs have a pretty low TDP. You can use ThrottleStop to try to prevent that but in my experience it won't always work.

83C is pretty high for a desktop, but it looks like you're on a laptop, and those normally run hotter due to cooling constraints, so I wouldn't worry. Either way it's not hot enough to kill a CPU, might have a small effect on the expected lifetime but it will probably die of other causes or simply go unused before the CPU dies.

If this was a desktop CPU running at stock speeds then 83C would be worringly high. Not because it will damage the CPU, but because it's a sign that something is not right with the cooling. For example, my i7 920 got up to about 76C when stress testing with the stock cooler, and that's a 130W TDP CPU. Newer CPUs run cooler since they are far more efficient. Even the high-end i7 8700K only has a 95W TDP. So having those kind of temps on any recent or semi-recent Intel CPU on a desktop would be a sign that either the cooler needs to be cleaned, the fan needs to be replaced or the thermal paste needs reapplying. Or someone just did an awful job with cable management.
On a laptop like he seems to be on though, it's a lot more normal. It's hardly optimal, but decent cooling on laptops is often sacrificed for portability.
when i ran stress tests in the past the motherboard would throttle down the cpu and not limit the power draw... what could have changed?

--------------------- MERGED ---------------------------

It may be high for any normal use. But he's running a Stress Test. A stress test is designed to stress the CPU to 100% usage (depending on the test). If the CPU gets to 83c as it's max temp during a Stress test, then it's perfectly fine, and normal, even on a desktop. If it's air cooled anyway.

If he was getting 83c with normal every day use, or gaming, then that is a sign that something is wrong somewhere.

But getting 83c as a MAX temp in a stress test is perfectly normal with an air cooled CPU.

Trust me, I built many gaming computers, and Overclocked a lot of i7 CPU's. To make sure the overclock is stable, I always ran a Stress test to pin the CPU at 100% for about an hour or two at a time, sometimes longer.
right now i am idling with about 50-55c and this is with a few chrome tabs open

--------------------- MERGED ---------------------------

is it norml for my cpu to be boosting constanly for the past 5 minutes it has been running a 2.90 - 2.96 ghz with little to no cpu usage?
 

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when i ran stress tests in the past the motherboard would throttle down the cpu and not limit the power draw... what could have changed?

--------------------- MERGED ---------------------------


right now i am idling with about 50-55c and this is with a few chrome tabs open

--------------------- MERGED ---------------------------

is it norml for my cpu to be boosting constanly for the past 5 minutes it has been running a 2.90 - 2.96 ghz with little to no cpu usage?
That's not normal. But it may not be a cooling issue at all, it could be a background process.

But I'm not saying it's not a cooling issue, because it could be. 55c at idle is not normal, but it's not a major issue either. It could be the ambient temp around you that is high, it could be that you need to clean out your laptop or PC, it could also be that you don't have enough air flow.

Laptops are very weird like that. I would do a Google search on your laptop and see what other people are saying about thier idle temps. If they are getting the around the same idle temps, then it's normal for your laptop.
 

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Really? It doesn't make sense to you?

You should do your research before you comment on something you know nothing about.

What happens when your Mobile phone gets to about 85c to 90c?

The iPhone 5S can withstand temps up to 113F. A PC CPU can work perfectly fine at 85c/185F. At 85c the iPhone 5S would probably start melting. lol.

So yes, PC hardware has a higher tolerance then other electronics.

Server grade hardware has even a higher tolerance then normal PC hardware.
I think he meant that "that's why all PC temps are in Celsius."doesn't make sense.
 
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Dominator211

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That's not normal. But it may not be a cooling issue at all, it could be a background process.

But I'm not saying it's not a cooling issue, because it could be. 55c at idle is not normal, but it's not a major issue either. It could be the ambient temp around you that is high, it could be that you need to clean out your laptop or PC, it could also be that you don't have enough air flow.

Laptops are very weird like that. I would do a Google search on your laptop and see what other people are saying about thier idle temps. If they are getting the around the same idle temps, then it's normal for your laptop.
a lot of people have had problem with my kinda of laptop ranginf from wifi problems to battery failure
 

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I think he meant that "that's why all PC temps are in Celsius."doesn't make sense.
It makes sense that they are in Celsius because Celsius seems a lot lower. 190F is about 85c, 190F looks like a huge unsafe temp, right? 85c doesn't look bad at all. And since PC hardware has a higher tolerance of temps, it only makes sense to use Celsius instead of Farenhight.

Like when you are measuring someone's height, you don't say the person is x amount centimeters. You would use a bigger unit of measurement, such as feet and/or inches.
 

Dominator211

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It makes sense that they are in Celsius because Celsius seems a lot lower. 190F is about 85c, 190F looks like a huge unsafe temp, right? 85c doesn't look bad at all. And since PC hardware has a higher tolerance of temps, it only makes sense to use Celsius instead of Farenhight.

Like when you are measuring someone's height, you don't say the person is x amount centimeters. You would use a bigger unit of measurement, such as feet and/or inches.
maybe i should clean it out but i dont think i should becuase it is 3 years old and i use it almost everyday so idk how exaclty dust can build up
 

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It makes sense that they are in Celsius because Celsius seems a lot lower. 190F is about 85c, 190F looks like a huge unsafe temp, right? 85c doesn't look bad at all. And since PC hardware has a higher tolerance of temps, it only makes sense to use Celsius instead of Farenhight.

Like when you are measuring someone's height, you don't say the person is x amount centimeters. You would use a bigger unit of measurement, such as feet and/or inches.
Your explanation makes no sense since the temperature will be identical whether measured in Celsius/Kelvin/Fahrenheit. They're just different scales for the same kind of measurement.

As for why Celsius is more often used to define temperature thresholds? That most likely has to do with Celsius being a measurement unit that is closely linked to the SI base unit standard Kelvin (K = C - 273.5) while still being easily understood in most countries of the world. Only a select few countries insist on using Fahrenheit and while conversion between the units isn't incredibly difficult it's a step that complicates things for little to no reason.
 
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TheTechGenius

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maybe i should clean it out but i dont think i should becuase it is 3 years old and i use it almost everyday so idk how exaclty dust can build up
Without dust filters on the intake holes, dust can build up over time. The fans suck dust in through the intake fans and go through the entire PC. It happens all the time on laptops and desktops when you use them every day.
 

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