Will my PSU work with my new Motherboard?

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by AceWarhead, Jun 7, 2012.

Jun 7, 2012
  1. AceWarhead
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    Member AceWarhead "Must Construct Additional Pylons"

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  2. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    Both are ATX compliant. They're compatible.
     
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  3. AceWarhead
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    Member AceWarhead "Must Construct Additional Pylons"

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    OK, thanks. I was so worried.
    This is the 5th time you've helped me, Originality, Thanks, O Mighty Computer Sage!
     
  4. exangel

    Member exangel executioner angel

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    ATX has more than one connector type and that PSU is a model that debuted in 2006..

    I had a PSU not fit a new motherboard earlier this year, because it was pretty old (2004-2006) and lacked a +4 connector.

    It's likely that you'll have the additional +4, but probably not the more recent +8(4+4) additional connector; but, the information on Amazon doesn't actually say.

    Older (2002-2006) basic motherboards only required 20-pin, or 24-pin, and the PSU's of the time typically had a 20+4 inline, so if you needed it, you'd attach the 4-pin to the 20-pin to make the 24pin. Now, there's usually an additional 4-pin or 4+4-pin which likewise has a snap to utilize the connector your motherboard requires. (The PSU in my most recent new build had a 4+4 connector, but I only needed the 4-pin, iirc.)

    This second connector is what I can't confirm from Amazon's info. But honestly, I doubt there's a 350w PSU that even has a 4+4 / 8-pin 12v connector on the market (except possibly designed for HTPC builds, which wouldn't be ATX-sized,) but that's just speculation. I don't think they did this in any PSU's in 2006.

    The Newegg page for your motherboard says:
    • 24 pin ATX power connector
    • 8 pin 12V power connector
    Therefore you should try it first, but it's unlikely that you will have all the connectors your motherboard requires. So do keep in mind the likelihood you'll have to replace that later. I'm not sure if it'll be possible for you to boot your system without having both power sockets connected. I doubt that it would damage your motherboard to try though.



    edit: major language flaw fixed
     
  5. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    The 20+4 pin cable is used for the motherboard itself, where as the 4+4 pin cable is used to supplement the CPU. It is possible to get it working with just a 4 pin cable (which is why the cap for it only covers the lower half of the 4+4 socket), however this means that the CPU may not be receiving enough power. This isn't an issue for low-end CPUs, but for the stronger ones and especially if you plan to use any overclocking features, the 4+4 cable is vital.

    I don't really know if the PSU has the 4+4 connector, but there's a very good chance that it has at least the 4-pin cable.

    Personally, I wouldn't ever buy a PSU from a brand I don't recognise, but that's not the question here. The question is if they're compatible, which they are.
     

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