Finding the 3DS Common Key

Discussion in '3DS - Flashcards & Custom Firmwares' started by Rapper_skull, May 24, 2012.

  1. Rapper_skull
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    Rapper_skull Member

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    Hi guys! I have an idea: why don't we create a 3DS common key bruteforcer as we did with the DSi one?
    I think it's not hard, it just need many luck to find it in millions of possible tries.
     
  2. klim28

    klim28 Hunter4Life

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    Easier said than done?
     
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  3. godreborn

    godreborn GBAtemp Psycho!

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    I'll also use that logic when I play power ball.
     
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  4. Eerpow

    Eerpow *swoosh*

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    millions...
    pfft as if it would be that easy.
    You could use all the computers in the world and still have a hard time finding it.
     
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  5. YamiHoshi.nl

    YamiHoshi.nl I'm MKGirlism.

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    Keep in mind, that the DSi is different from the 3DS.
    I mean, even for the DSi, it took a few years, to find an exploit in a DSiWare App, which got removed/patched.
     
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  6. Pong20302000

    Pong20302000 making notes on everything

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    didnt nintendo just patch the header that was used on the DSi exploit for the IEvolution?
    but the headers had to be region specific?
     
  7. dragonmaster

    dragonmaster THE WALKER

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    lets put cern raw cpu power to do the search :P
     
  8. Janthran

    Janthran Solarian

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    Does anything more even need to be said?
     
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  9. Quietlyawesome94

    Quietlyawesome94 GBAtemp Maniac

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    Yes.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    The iEvo exploit was not based on the header. As far as I know, it was an exploit in the Wi-Fi subsystem.
     
  11. RupeeClock

    RupeeClock Colors 3D Snivy!

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    There was an effort to brute force the DSi common key with a networked brute forcer before, I don't think it went over very well though.

    Even though it would probably take millions of computers to run the program for millions of years to find the 3DS common key, I'd still like to try running it.
     
  12. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    The thing with Bruteforce methods is that you never know how long it will take to find the key - it can take hundreds of years, it can take two minutes - everything depends on the algorithm used. That said, there really isn't all that much you could *do* with said Common Key if we don't know how the encryption even works.
     
  13. Janthran

    Janthran Solarian

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    To try every possible combination, it'd take a long time.
    Considerably less if you take into account that it has to be one of the keys.


     
  14. LAA

    LAA GBAtemp Fan

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    There is one thing about these things though...
    Even though there may be millions of combinations, whos to say it wont be the 1/2/3 key you generate? It doesnt mean you have to go through 1-last generations to get the key, but if I was nintendo, I'd probably purposely make the key around the half-way mark so it'd be harder.
    I always wondered about having computers generate the keys in different ways. Like you could have a group of computers generating keys from beginning to middle, then another group of computers from middle to end, you could even split it further.

    At the end of the day however, I'm not really an expert on this stuff.
     
  15. Pippin666

    Pippin666 SSF43DE Master

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    Is there such a thing as a 3DS common key in the first place ?? I thought each 3DS has it's own key.

    Pip'
     
  16. jrk190

    jrk190 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    I'm pretty sure this is the case. It's why we need the encryption keys, which are specific to each device, I think. Also, this is also why saves can't be transferred, etc. People refuse to understand the fact that we need the encryption keys. By what I've gathered, Nintendo did away with common keys around the DSi cartridge era due to the fact that people could hack into dsi-mode. I think Neimod displayed this at one point.
     
  17. ichichfly

    ichichfly GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    There are more keys. Some are different on every 3DS some are not.
     
  18. SifJar

    SifJar Not a pirate

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    No, I believe it was a buffer overflow exploit in Cooking Coach or Classic Word Games (can't remember which of WinterMute's exploits iEvo ripped off)
     
  19. sentinel5000

    sentinel5000 GBAtemp Fan

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    I have a better idea, why dont some of you impatient kids go to nintendo of america, wait till reggie comes out of work and BRUTEFORCE the keys out of him? :D Anyways, be patient or just buy then damn games, play them, beat them, then sell them for 5 bucks less, just remember NEVER to take anything to trade in at gamestop or ull get screwed hard.
     
  20. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvertâ„¢

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    Here's my copy-paste from the DSi stuff.



    I present to you: "DSi Encryption Put In Perspective", also known as "I Love Crushing People's Dreams".

    The DSi uses 128-bit encryption (IIRC).
    How do you break it? You find the correct encryption key.

    How many encryption keys are there? 2 (binary, a bit) to the 128th power (number of bits), divided by 8 (8 bits in a byte).
    That's so many that the calculator that comes with windows (at least XP) can't even display the number without reverting to scientific notation.

    128-bits is...
    340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 possible values in binary.
    However, Since there's 8 bits in a byte, you divide 128 by 8 and get 16. That's 16 bytes, 16 characters.
    That's 18,446,744,073,709,552,000 possible values, ranging from 0x0000000000000000 to 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF. Eighteen quintillion possible keys.
    The actual number is a bit less less since a key will be a certain number of digits and be designed to not have repeating segments, but this puts it in perspective.

    Let's say that you have a computer program which can try 50,000 unique keys a second.
    That's 3,000,000 keys a minute.
    180,000,000 keys in an hour.
    4,320,000,000 keys a day.
    1,576,800,000,000 keys in one year.

    It would take 11,698,848 years to try all the keys at that speed.

    So wait, how do they break other systems? If you can get a direct copy of the encrypted data and compare it to a copy of the unencrypted data (as well as view the data as it's transmitted around the DSi's internals), that goes a long way towards figuring out the key without having to try all possible combinations. You'll be able to find the key without all the guessing! The problem is you'd need to take a DSi apart and fuck with it's insides while it's on to try to get a copy of the data while it's unencrypted (since the DSi will unencrypt what it needs on the fly in order to use it), and usually when you're done with that the DSi's pretty broken and in no shape to game, or even to be experimented on a second time...
    [​IMG]
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/micahdowty/sets/72157621023570420/

    This process can be hampered by the internal design of the system, so you may need to take apart many systems before you even figure out how to read some of the data, let alone get a full copy of it, and last I checked DSi's don't cost $5...
     
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