Replacing computer parts

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by xakota, Mar 14, 2011.

Mar 14, 2011

Replacing computer parts by xakota at 10:54 PM (720 Views / 0 Likes) 8 replies

  1. xakota
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    Member xakota GBAtemp Fan

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    Hello everyone, I've just ordered a new power supply and this is going to be my first time replacing a computer part. I need to know:
    1. What do I need to know?
    2. What do I need to do to avoid frying anything?
    3. I'm hearing a lot of people saying that I need to wear an anti-static wrist strap to avoid frying the computer, and also a lot of people saying I don't. Your verdict?
     
  2. Jamstruth

    Member Jamstruth Secondary Feline Anthropomorph

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    1. Touch as little as possible. Also make sure you take photos of certain things. I'm not sure but I think certain plugs on motherboards have specific ways the cables need to be arranged before they'll work properly. Make sure you know where you're putting things.
    Also after powering off the PC completely press the power button again to make sure the PSU is fully discharged.

    2. Touch a piece of copper piping (radiator pipe) before you go to your computer. do this periodically throughout just in case. This discharges any static in your body and should mean that unless you put your palm flat against the Mobo you'll be fine.
     
  3. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    Replacing the PSU is straightforward, but very fiddly. The parts that need power - motherboard (12V ATX, usually one long connector and one 4 or 8 pin ATX connector), drives (SATA and/or molex - molex can also be used to power case fans), and mid-ranged or higher graphics cards (either 6-pin or 8-pin PCIe connectors). Once you've plugged everything in, try and find a way to tie off loose cables to keep them out of the way.

    The dangers of damage through static shock are low, but not uncommon. Touching an uncoated (unpainted/varnished) metal sheet or a grounded metal object (radiator) will dissipate your accumulated static, and minimise the already small chance of static shock. some cases include a ground wire for this very purpose. Generally so long as you take a basic precaution, you won't have any problems with static.

    Personally I've never encountered any problems either way, but I do try and ground myself when possible. It's like remembering to wash your hands after going to the toilet.
     
  4. twiztidsinz

    Member twiztidsinz Taiju Yamada Fan

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    Anti-static wrist straps are just stupid. I had to wear one when I was taking computer repair in Highschool. It just got in the way and half the time unsnapped or came off (the wrist strap was connected with a snap button to a coiled wire with alligator clip neither of which were all that secure).

    Touching the parts as little as possible is a good idea in theory, but often a rather moot point.
    You're going to have to handle the parts and if your work area is cramped, you're going to be handling them more as you try to navigate/maneuver them into place.
    Don't carry them around with you and only pick them up when you're going to try to put them in.

    Taking pictures isn't going to help you much either. You'll have to worry about lighting and things obscuring your way to get a picture that's worth any good, in which time I could have taken whatever you're changing out put a new part in and grabbed a drink.
    Besides, the majority of connectors are keyed, which means they only fit in ONE way.

    As for grounding yourself, ANY metal on the case will work. It's not hard to keep yourself grounded at all times by constantly touching some part of the metal case, I often 'lean' my arm against the case or rest my wrist when working inside. Wearing a short-sleeve shirt help (rolled up sleeves work, but can cause static).
     
  5. xakota
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    Member xakota GBAtemp Fan

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    Another question. The PSU I ordered only comes with 1 6pin connector. Is it possible to add more?
     
  6. twiztidsinz

    Member twiztidsinz Taiju Yamada Fan

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    Can you link the PSU in question?

    Only having 1 6 pin connector (not even sure off the top of my head WHAT a 6 pin connector is for, sounds more like a special PCI-E or a motherboard power connector) doesn't sound right.
     
  7. omgdaniel

    Newcomer omgdaniel Advanced Member

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    6 Pins are foe PCI-E graphics cards. And there are adapters that go from 4 Pin molex to 6 Pin PCI-E
     
  8. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    6-pin power cables are for PCIe. Some graphics cards use molex instead, some need an 8-pin power cable. EDIT: High end graphics cards need two 6-pin connectors, or even two 8-pin connectors (like in the HD 6990).

    omgdaniel is right, molex adaptors do exist, however it will not have a dedicated 12V rail for the PCIe card, so it won't be as stable. Basically, with that PSU stick to graphics cards that don't need any more than a single 6-pin connector for power.

    Motherboards only ever use 4 or 8 pin power connectors. Sometimes they use molex, but from what I've seen that's very rare and only in certain budget boards. When dealing with a motherboard that needs an 8-pin connector, try not to confuse the 12V ATX 8-pin cable with an 8-pin PCIe cable. High end PSUs that have them will put them on different rails to ensure an efficient supply to high-powered devices, so mixing them up will mean power distribution will be less than ideal.
     
  9. xakota
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    Member xakota GBAtemp Fan

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    Thanks, I'll just play it safe and use a card that only needs one.
     

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