how long does it take for games to come out of testing?

Discussion in 'General Gaming Discussion' started by notrustinsasuke, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. notrustinsasuke
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    notrustinsasuke Advanced Member

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    when a game goes in testing for bugs how long does it take to release?
     
  2. Nathan Drake

    Nathan Drake Obligations fulfilled, now I depart.

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    As long as it takes? I doubt there is one magical standard for bug testing that applies to all games.
     
  3. Ryupower

    Ryupower Brood

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    depends,
    some game are quick and are rushed during testing just so the game can be out (ubisoft and AC:unity?)
    some game fail a thing then go back to get fixed the more testing is done (it can take months to years for some game)
     
  4. Sterling

    Sterling GBAtemp's Silver Hero

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    To an extent, I agree with Nathan Drake, however there's a point where the game is 'good enough'. As complexities ramp up, so does the time spent testing. Games now can hardly ever be bug free, so it's important to ensure that the bugs the player experiences are not game breaking. And it depends on an assload of factors. Some more mundane than the rest.
     
  5. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    It also depends a lot on when the bug is found. If it is found just after writing the erroneous code, it won't take as long as when huge piles of other code are written that depend on it (which means that fixing the bug could potentially introduce a bunch of other bugs).

    The impact of the bug also plays a role (as Sterling mentions): bugs that could cause many manhours to fix but consist only of very rare glitches are usually just skipped.

    Then there's the environment: console games are relatively easy because there is ONE way to do things. With pc and mobile games, actually testing things requires far more work as different hardware, resolutions and input methods are needed. Which obviously either increases the bug testing time, or make a company feel 'lazy' when they don't have the time and/or resources to properly dig into all possible ways a game should be tested on.