Emunand Tool for Mac

Discussion in '3DS - Flashcards & Custom Firmwares' started by tintin.92, Feb 3, 2015.

  1. tintin.92
    OP

    tintin.92 Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    88
    24
    Dec 31, 2014
    United States
    So I just got my micro sd adapter for my 64GB micro sd, I can now move onto CIAs. I wanna move my emunand to the new SD, and of course need the Emunand tool for that. Thing is, I have a Mac.

    Barring Bootcamp, is there any other option? Neither wine nor VirtualBox worked.

    I don't have anything particularly important on my old Emunand. Can I just create a new one on the new SD? I have already logged in to NNId on the current Emunand. Also have a save file on a Pokemon OmegaRuby retail cart that I cannot lose.
     
  2. Kafke

    Kafke GBAtemp Fan

    Member
    415
    144
    Jan 2, 2009
    United States
    See here: http://wiki.gbatemp.net/wiki/3DS_Ha...my_EmuNAND_partition_located_on_my_SD_card.3F

    You need to know whether your NAND is Samsung or Toshiba. You can determine this by examining the size of your backed up sysNand.

    From there, back up the NAND part (not the dummy.bin stuff) of your current card. Make an emunand on the new card and extract the dummy.bin part of the new one.

    Then run the lines that combine it into sd_tmp.bin, and write that to the new card, following the instructions.

    That should successfully transfer your old NAND.

    An easier way (if there's no system info you'd like to keep), would be to simply make a new emunand based on the same linked sysnand. But if you de-linked, this isn't possible.

    As a side note, this works with the CFW as well (if you already have CFW installed on one, you can migrate it). It's important to note that the dummy.bin contains the partitioning data, which means if you use your old dummy.bin, you'll actually end up with your new card being formatted the same way, and missing all that extra space (and there's no way to resize this format with Mac).

    Edit: After you flash/write the emunand to your new card, obviously you need to transfer the SD files.
     
  3. tintin.92
    OP

    tintin.92 Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    88
    24
    Dec 31, 2014
    United States
    Thanks for your reply. I have a couple more questions.

    1) My Sysnand is delinked. What exactly are the consequences of making a new emunand from this (and using it)?
    2) I can't even see the band partition on my Mac. Therefore can't see the size of the nand. What should I do? Edit: You said Sysnand. Unfortunately I lost my sysnand backup when I lost my old laptop. Should I do another backup to find out?
     
  4. Kafke

    Kafke GBAtemp Fan

    Member
    415
    144
    Jan 2, 2009
    United States

    Emunand is literally a clone of sysNand, but stored on the SD. That's all it is. Linked NANDs means that your ticket is the same, and that you can use the same software/saves on each of them.

    In a 3-NAND set up (sysNand and 2 emunands), all three can be linked if you don't format any of them. Which will allow easy transfer between the 2 emunands.

    So to answer your questions:

    1. Your new emunand would only work with your sysnand stuff, and any new emunand stuff. The old emunand would be incompatible. If you want your old emunand stuff, you gotta extract/import the emunand as I mentioned above. That is: make new emunand based on your sysnand -> extract old emunand -> extract new dummy.bin -> combine and write to new SD. That would give you your old emunand on your new card.

    2. Right. As I said, Mac doesn't support this specific type of format, which is a bit of a problem. Did you back up your sysnand? You can do this by booting the gateway go exploit (and I think MT's launcher can as well), and selecting "back up NAND". This will put a NAND.bin on your SD card (on the file partition). Just look at this file's size. Using right click -> get info. And compare with the listed sizes on the page I linked. Your emunand will be the same size, so you don't need to worry about that.

    So all in all, here's what you want to do:

    1. Back up sysnand using the gateway go (web browser) launcher. It's literally called "back up NAND" or something of the sort.

    2. Look at the created NAND.bin size to determine toshiba/samsung.

    3. Put in your old SD card, and extract the Nand using the method mentioned. Ignore the dummy.bin line.

    4. Put in your new SD card, and extract the dummy.bin using the method mentioned. Ignore the NAND.bin lines this time.

    5. Run the lines to create the SD_tmp.bin using the extracted new dummy.bin and the extracted old NAND.bin.

    6. Write the SD_tmp.bin file to your new SD card.

    7. Transfer your stuff from your old SD card to the new one.

    Keep in mind, that you might get a "resource busy" warning. If this happens, unmount the SD card using "diskutil unmountDISK [diskname]".

    Step 3 extracts your old emunand, step 4 extracts the partition info from your new emunand, step 5 combines them, and step 6 writes your old emunand to your new card.

    Hopefully that clears things up. If you transfer your old emunand, then it will function exactly as it does now, just on the new card. You can, if you'd like, keep the old card with the old emunand (don't erase it afterwards), and run 2 emunand SD cards, swapping them out as you please. A similar setup is used for CFW.

    Edit: When transferring the emunand, make sure you did "format emunand" on your new card, so that there is indeed an emunand partition. Otherwise it'd be unreadable garbage, haha.
     
  5. tintin.92
    OP

    tintin.92 Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    88
    24
    Dec 31, 2014
    United States
    I think I've understood everything now. I'll give it a shot and report back.

    Thanks for being so patient with me, and for all your help.
     
  6. Kafke

    Kafke GBAtemp Fan

    Member
    415
    144
    Jan 2, 2009
    United States

    No problem. I had a hell of a time trying to get this all set up myself. The only thing I couldn't figure out how to do was run the redNAND empty buffer tool thing for the CFW. Doesn't work in wine for whatever reason, so I had to run it on my windows machine. But yea, backing up and restoring NANDs is a pain in mac, because we don't get those lovely tools.
     
  7. tintin.92
    OP

    tintin.92 Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    88
    24
    Dec 31, 2014
    United States
    Yeah, Mac users need some love too :lol:

    Honestly I could try and do it on a PC as well, but It'll take a while before I get access to one, and since this method seems 100% safe (if a little cumbersome), I figured I'd give it a try.
     
  8. Kafke

    Kafke GBAtemp Fan

    Member
    415
    144
    Jan 2, 2009
    United States

    Yea, if all you are doing is moving NANDs around, following my instructions works fine. I actually did a hop from 2gb->32gb and then another one from 32gb->32gb. Both times using the method I mentioned. If you accidentally use your old dummy.bin, it'll keep the partition data, which makes getting a bigger card useless :P.
     
  9. tintin.92
    OP

    tintin.92 Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    88
    24
    Dec 31, 2014
    United States
    Another question (that I fear I should have asked earlier). a 64 gig card isn't an issue, right? I got a class 10 one and I'd hate to have to use it with Gateway.
     
  10. Kafke

    Kafke GBAtemp Fan

    Member
    415
    144
    Jan 2, 2009
    United States

    I have no idea. The partition stuff I mentioned earlier (transferring emunand and all that) should work fine. But I'm not sure if it'd work in the 3DS itself. Provided you can do 'format emunand' and run the emunand normally, the steps I outlined will work.

    The steps I wrote out simply take the emunand partition of one card, and places it in the other, keeping the partition table the same. Whether or not a 64gb card will work is unrelated.

    So given it works with the format emunand, then it should be fine. At worst, it just won't boot. There's no risk to your console or anything.