Wii won't display in 480p over component on any CRT, no matter what I do

Discussion in 'Wii - Hardware, Devices and Utilities' started by xwatchmanx, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. xwatchmanx
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    xwatchmanx GBAtemp's (Un)Ironic Weeaboo

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    So this is an issue that I've been struggling with for a while, and it's driving me absolutely insane. I've attempted to display my Wii in 480p via component on two HDTVs, and 2 CRTs with component hookups. In all cases, it works perfectly on the HDTVs but simply displays a bunch of black and gray static on the CRTs. Here are all the facts, in hopes that someone can help me out here. I've tried literally everything I've googled, to no avail.

    -The Wii is GameCube compatible (bought refurbished from GameStop nearly a year and a half ago).

    -I'm using a Nyko-brand component cable. I've tried one other third party component cable (though I don't know the brand, as I bought it used and unmarked), with the exact same results.

    -The two HDTVs I've displayed both 480i and 480p on are the 32 inch Sansui in my old apartment, and the 24 inch PlayStation 3D Gaming Display Monitor I currently own. There are no display issues whatsoever on these TVs.

    -The two component-equipped CRTs I've tried (and failed) to display 480p on are by Sony and Insignia (I'm afraid I don't know the model numbers, and am not quite sure how to find out).

    -If I boot up the Wii on the 3D TV and manually switch the resolution to 480i in settings, then plug the Wii via component into the Insignia CRT, it displays in 480i perfectly. However, the display switches back to black and gray static the moment I switch back to 480p in settings.

    It seems that the CRT ONLY detects the green cable when in 480p. If I unplug the blue and red, nothing happens, but if I unplug the green, the image disappears completely, along with the sound.

    -I've tried the green cable in the composite input trick. No luck. It lets me switch the resolution it settings via a black and white screen, but still displays nothing in 480p when plugged back into the component jacks.

    -I've tried plugging the Wii both into a switch box, and directly into the TV's component inputs. Still no luck.

    -Here's the kicker: Both of my PS2s (one fat, one slim) has no display issues whatsoever via any component cable I've ever used them with, on any TV.

    So what the hell? Why can't I get my Wii to display in 480p on a CRT with component? The reason this is so important to me now is that I'm getting the Zelda Wii U bundle in a couple days, and I want to use my Wii to play GameCube games in 480p on a TV that actually makes them look good (that way I don't have to shell out $200 on a GameCube component cable). My last resort is the official Nintendo Wii component cable, which I think I might buy tonight. But I can't imagine that would be the case, as the Nyko cable displays perfectly on the two HDTVs I've used.

    Tl; dr: HALP!
     


  2. Leo Alves

    Leo Alves GBAtemp Regular

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    Are you sure that your crt tvs support progressive scan?

    Because most CRT TVs, even with component video input only support up to 480i

    I also have a CRT TV, and my wii only works in 480i, when I put the Wii in 480p I get no video signal, just audio.
    but even in 480i, the difference is notable, much more sharpness and contrast
    Twilight Princess looks pretty good, and games
    And games that have small text, like Skyward Sword and Xenoblade, with the component cables it is much easier to read
     
  3. xwatchmanx
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    xwatchmanx GBAtemp's (Un)Ironic Weeaboo

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    Why would a CRT include component input if it doesn't support at least 480p? That sounds so pointless. :\

    Also my PS2 displays just fine, so why wouldn't my Wii?
     
  4. cammelspit

    cammelspit Member

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    PS2 does not support 480P except in the case of less than a handful of games like GOW. Sorry dude looks like you can't do progressive scan on your TV.
     
  5. Hero-Link

    Hero-Link Hero of Derrr

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    If it works on others TVs... its obviously not the console or the cables fault.

    100% Sure it's the TV...
     
  6. drfsupercenter

    drfsupercenter Flash Cart Aficionado

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    I have a CRT that supports component but only 480i.

    It makes sense if you think about it - component provides better video quality than composite, even if the resolution is the same, the colors are less blended. Composite -> S-Video -> Component, all at 480i. Then of course component at 480p, then HD stuff.

    So yeah, if you're using a CRT it's not going to do 480p. Just use the component cable and leave it interlaced - even if it DID support 480p, CRT TVs by nature interlace the picture, that's just how they work. So it would be pointless.
     
  7. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    Component can deliver 480i but not 480p. There is no mandatory resolution when it comes to component.

    PS2 default display in 480i except for games that support 480p. You need to manually hold down some buttons on supported games to enable 480p.

    Back then, even DVD runs at 480i. There isn't much incentive for 480p.
     
  8. Cyan

    Cyan GBATemp's lurking knight

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    Some precision for PS2:
    I think you meant "composite can only deliver 480i".
    For users wondering how to open the progressive menu, it's by holding Triangle and Cross when launching a compatible game (Valkyrie profile 2)
    Some games have ingame menu to force progressive mode (Tomb Raider anniversary, Burnout legend)
    and too bad, some of the latest games didn't support it (FF XII)
     
  9. cammelspit

    cammelspit Member

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    There was a SMALL number of 480P capable CRT TVs for a short time and that was called EDTVs Or Extended Def, High def requires at least 1080i/540P to be officially HD. The likelihood of yours or any other CRT to be an EDTV is Exceptionally low as it cost a fabulous amount of money for those TVs to be ED. Sort of halfway to a PC monitor, so to speak. May be just better to get a low end flat-panel LCD HDTV if you REALLY want to do 480P from your Wii. Here is ome more info if you are interested. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enhanced-definition_television
     
  10. tbgtbg

    tbgtbg Shaking the ring ropes up in the sky

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    Yes, but there are also actual HDTV CRT's out there as well. Granted, what this guy has is neither ED or HD, just an SD CRT with component inputs.

    It's still best to use component, even if you can only do 480i. It should still be noticeably better than composite.
     
  11. cammelspit

    cammelspit Member

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    Without a doubt, my friend. I have even seen some 1080P CRT 4:3 Display such as the NEC MultiSync XP37 Plus from ages ago. These screens are simply obsolete and would cost more than a new low end HDTV would cost and that is only if he can't live without ED resolutions from his Wii. Frankly The Wii is not very powerful and the difference between SD and ED is not a lot but really is only double picture data (Progressive VS Interlaced) at the same render resolution at under half a megapixel where as 1080P is almost 2.1 megapixels over 4 times the resolution and that WOULD give a far superior quality. So I feel it's Ok to just use the Wii on whatever display you happen to have, even SD 4:3 CRT as the experience on the whole isn't going to get a HUGE amount better unless you are like me and just HAVE to use the best output possible. Hell, I was one of the five guys who had a seperate PC monitor dedicated to my Dreamcast using the VGA cable.;)
     
  12. Wisenheimer

    Wisenheimer GBAtemp Fan

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    The first question I would ask is whether the TV is capable of displaying a 16:9 aspect ratio. If it is expecting a 4:3 signal, then setting the mode to 480p is going to display garbage on the TV unless you also set the Wii to 4:3.

    The second question I would ask is whether the TV has more than one component input. On my old CRT, it had separate inputs for 480i and 480p/1080i.

    If the TV is capable of 480p input and not displaying it correctly, I would look into those causes first.
     
  13. xwatchmanx
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    xwatchmanx GBAtemp's (Un)Ironic Weeaboo

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    Wow, I totally forgot about this thread. Thanks for the responses, guys. As you point out, it turns out my TV is a simple SD TV without any 480p capability. :( Quite a shame.
    I already have a good HD TV I can play my Wii in 480p on. The reason I want a typical 4:3 box ED TV is so I can play all my old generation systems on a TV that makes them look good, while still getting 480p out of GameCube games played on my Wii (so I don't have to spent $200 on a GameCube component cable). I have a Wii U now, so I just play my Wii games through that. I was just hoping to play GameCube games in 480p on a 4:3 TV via my Wii.

    Oh well. Maybe sometime down the line I'll do some research and hunting for a good EDTV.
     
  14. Wisenheimer

    Wisenheimer GBAtemp Fan

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    Actually, a 480p signal in 16:9 is 2.7 times the number of pixels per scan as a 480i signal in 4:3. By contrast, a 720p signal (like those commonly rendered by the Wii's competing consoles) is only a 2.25 increase in resolution per scan over 480p signal in the same aspect ratio.
     
  15. cammelspit

    cammelspit Member

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    I was not comparing 480P to 720P I was comparing EDtv broadcast which is 852 × 480 408960pixels which is less than .5 megapixel VS 1080P thich is 1920 X 1080 2073600 pixels which is just under 2.1 megapixels. This is not getting into 480p 4:3 which is 640 x 480 or 480P 16:9 which is 720 x 480 like an NTSC DVD would use. This is all with NTSC in mind as the PAL stuff further complicates things. Also, The current gen consoles display in 1080P, yes , but that also doesn't take into account differences in render vs display resolution. The 360 for example renders most games at very much so less than 720P and then the video encoder simply pushes a scaled image through to the TV, but some select games still do render in 1080P. The PS3 renders in the actual full resolution of the image without fail as it's own video encoder cannot do the same scaling. So a PS3 game in 1080P is actually 1920x1080 and 720P is actually 1440x720. But all this is still not REALLY making a difference with a Wii. :) Sorry if my previous post was not as concise as you needed but I hope that clears it up!:yaywii:
     
  16. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    DVD never use 480p, it is 704 x 480 or 720 x 480 that is resized to,

    * 640 x 480 (480i)
    * 720 x 540 (downscaled by DVD player into 480i)
    * 853 x 480 (480i)

    On rare occasion you would see DVD in 240p.

    EDTV is called enhanced definition TV. They are pricy.
     
  17. nl255

    nl255 GBAtemp Addict

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    Though it is possible to force most PS2 games to run in 480P or even 720P if you have a hacked PS2. Not that it matters in this case.
     
  18. Thanatos Telos

    Thanatos Telos random stuff

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    EDTVs are extremely expensive for what they give you. ~$500 or so for the bottom of the barrel ones.
     
  19. GBA rocks

    GBA rocks GBAtemp Fan

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    Of course high end CRTs (good TVs and professional/medical CRTs) will give you the option of carrying R+G+B or Y+Pb+Pr on 3 separate signals, that's what supporting component is about and it makes a lot of sense even without progressive scan support.
    What you said is like saying RGB is pointless without 480p. In Europe component was pretty rare on consumer CRT TVs because most of them supported RGB over SCART anyway, whereas in the US it should be more common since there is no SCART and this situation definitely predates the wide adoption of consumer sources of progressive scan video (progressive scan capable DVD players, gamecubes, etc.), so there's no wonder there are component CRTs without 480p support.

    My Sony PVM-20M2MDE supports 4 component modes (RGB with sync on Green, RGB with external sync, YPbPr with sync on Luma, YPbPr with external sync), I use an official nintendo component cable and the Wii outputs YPbPr with sync on Luma.
    Thanks to Component (even if 480i) the picture is awesome, great colors, great picture on virtual console retro games, but 480p looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    (the latter is from a GC game with Progressive?-->Yes selected independently from Wii menu settings)

    480p is not supported on this particular monitor (and on yours) because it was never meant to, doesn't mean it's pointless.
    Still I'm curious about what causes that "duplication" effect on a technical level and why do I get that instead of simple gray static or un-synced mess.
     
  20. GBA rocks

    GBA rocks GBAtemp Fan

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    Something similar happens to me if I put the CRT in RGB mode instead of YPbPr mode.
    The Wii outputs YPbPr, the CRT is listening expecting RGB, the resulting picture is completely green in my case.
    It may be your case too (the CRT expecting RGB). Make sure the CRTs you try support YPbPr over component and are currently in YPbPr listening mode.

    note: sometimes YPbPr is simply referred to as "Component" in TV settings (that's the case of my aforementioned sony pvm, where component modes are called "RGB" and "Component", which makes no sense since both are over component but that's it).