What the best Game Maker Software?

BigOnYa

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So I want everyone's opinion here. I'm looking to try to learn some game maker software and when I look up beginner software, there are lots and they all claim to be the best (of-course) but I'm looking for PC windows based software on a complete beginner level, that can be run on PC, or maybe be ported to other platforms. Thanks for any comments.
 
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Best: Probably Unity, it is suitable for both 2D and 3D. Especially as it supports C# which is a useful language to know anyway (and fairly easy to learn)
Easiest for a beginner on the other hand, I wouldn't exactly say Unity is easy for a beginner. I started with Game Maker myself, and it was great since you can make games without using any code, and slowly ease yourself into using more and more code in projects (as you learn the code equivalents of all of the actions that can be inserted in the object editor), until you're using all code.
I also found it easy to learn other languages after becoming a pro at GML, since the syntax is similar to popular languages.
But that was many years ago. I don't know much about how game maker has...

FAST6191

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The ability to program coupled with ability to design games (both in the https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iNSQIyNpVGHeak6isbP6AHdHD50gs8MNXF1GCf08efg/pub?embedded=true sense and "tell me about game theory" sense) is the best. If you can at all start from that then I would strongly consider it, even if your lesser talented mate has made something fancy while you are still getting to grips with some rudiments of programming.

There are engines that game devs will use to prototype mechanics that they will later build from scratch, though that they later build them from scratch says it is about as useful as the cardboard model that some engineering types might start out with.

There are those that will twist things. Ao Oni used RPG maker, but was anything but an RPG. While that might be an example of overcoming restrictions, or maybe playing to them, then said restrictions will always be there. I don't know how true "you will always think in terms of your first game making tool" is when compared to languages both programming and spoken, where it is rather notable, but I would not bet against it. Restrictions and limitations are why most game devs will eschew them and be something you constantly butt heads with, and have been the case in every one I have ever tried, and imagine it always will be until we get something like natural language programming.

Going back to the opening bit then you may also want to be flexing different aspects of game development muscle -- if I have to build an engine or work within a junk one then my track building for racing might be rather hampered vs finding a game with mod making tools.
Said mods if they are close to a base engine might also be a thing; if you picked say unreal for your engine then you could go from scratch, or find a game that uses a largely stock engine and mod that to have an easier in as you have working variables you can start from.
That would also speak to the other things of what do you want to make -- Unity might do well for exploration and 90s PC platforming but probably going to be harder to do a racing game or complicated RPG that RPG maker might do.


At the same time it is noted in programming tuition, and other practical skills type affairs, that the best motivation is a project that you will do. If it turns out that the existing stuff is what will do that for you then yeah. That does also mean you can grab https://trilarion.github.io/opensourcegames/ or https://osgameclones.com/ and play with that.
 

KimKong

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I suggest going retro in that *ish*
Download GBStudio v2 beta5 and start making some dope GameBoy games I can put on my flashcard and have fun with on the weekends! It's all free to use - So get on now, get to steppin'! If you wan't to put a little bang behind your buck , I suggest you pay for the latest version of NESmaker and start making some dope games I can put on my Mini Consoles and my Wii!!

Both these got a good visual script editor going on, so you can easy make any type of game you want - without knowing any code! And best of all - The games you make can be played on real Nintendo hardware! (if you got the equipment to flash them to a cart)
 

FAST6191

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You say that, Silent_Gunner, but if you did want to take the mod approach to life then you could quite justifiably do that even solo and gain a nice dose of art, writing, game balancing (you need not be able to tell me what a quad precision float is to be able to tell me an instant use 1mp spell that does 9999999 damage is going to be overpowered in a game where you have enemies mostly with around 1000 health and magic regenerates by the second) and scripting.
 

The Real Jdbye

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Best: Probably Unity, it is suitable for both 2D and 3D. Especially as it supports C# which is a useful language to know anyway (and fairly easy to learn)
Easiest for a beginner on the other hand, I wouldn't exactly say Unity is easy for a beginner. I started with Game Maker myself, and it was great since you can make games without using any code, and slowly ease yourself into using more and more code in projects (as you learn the code equivalents of all of the actions that can be inserted in the object editor), until you're using all code.
I also found it easy to learn other languages after becoming a pro at GML, since the syntax is similar to popular languages.
But that was many years ago. I don't know much about how game maker has changed (for better or worse) since then, or what alternatives may have surfaced.
If you want to start out with simple 2D games then I'd say you can't go wrong with Game Maker. It's a bit slow for more complex games with lots of objects on screen or 3D games though.
 
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