What Linux distros do you all use?

Discussion in 'Computer Software and Operating Systems' started by BiggieCheese, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Gon Freecss

    Gon Freecss Telegram Advocate

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    Mint 18
     
  2. Lilith Valentine

    Lilith Valentine GBATemp's Wolf-husky™ definitely not Lilith

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    I have used more distros than any normal person should, but currently I've been rocking Solus Budgie for well over 2 years now. I also use Manjaro and Linux Mint from time to time depending on the hardware. If not those I also use openSUSE tumbleweed if I can.
     
    Last edited by Lilith Valentine, Sep 9, 2018
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  3. Tumoche

    Tumoche GBAtemp Regular

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    Kali and ubuntu for the most part
     
  4. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    My policy for general use is if it isn't on https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major or puppy linux then it is not worth doing. If it is going to be a specialist thing then I would have to wonder why there is no guide/package list for a more mainstream one as well.

    Similarly arch is a fun learning tool (kind of like a reduced version of http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/ ) but for anything vaguely resembling something I want to use, much less install for a client*, then poke that. Their wiki is good stuff though.

    *I managed to pull off the apparent coup of getting non computer people to have a linux machine and enjoy it. Not sure how I did it but I think I can thank Microsoft's efforts with Windows 8 and 10 in getting people from being too comfortable with a UI.

    Never cared for ubuntu as a distro, though they do some good for the general ecosystem. To that end I am happy with Linux Mint most of the time and debian for anything else.

    With that said everything has an IRC program, firefox or a spinoff, gimp, libreoffice and all the other programs or equivalents I care for, though these days 95% of computer is the browser for me.
     
  5. Joom

    Joom  ❤❤❤

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    I run Debian on my server because I'm lazy. I can't consciously use Linux as a desktop OS anymore, though. I made the move to macOS two years ago and never looked back. It offers a far more superior UNIX experience. The GNU toolchain is also available for it, so there's really no need for me to ever use Linux again. Forgive me if this sounds arrogant, but I've been in this business for over a decade. One eventually gets tired of constantly applying bandaids.
     
    Last edited by Joom, Sep 9, 2018
  6. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    The trouble for mac for me, other than them thinking they know better than me how I should be doing things, is everybody wanting something for what I find to be basic tasks on Windows or more other *nix variants. That and the shockingly poor build quality/design of their hardware.

    I usually figure if I am going to hobble myself in some way I am certainly not going to pay for it.
     
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  7. matpower

    matpower A Hero of Justice

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    I'm curious, you don't want to use a restricting mess (Poetteringware) and proprietary stuff, but yet you moved back to Windows?

    As for OP's question, I currently run Fedora 28, triple booted with OpenBSD and FreeDOS (no purpose, just for fun atm) on my X220, and Fedora 28, dual booted with Windows 10, on my desktop.

    I am currently suffering from a funky "flip done bit time out" error on my X220 ever since I reinstalled Fedora, which I couldn't fix (although I haven't dug much into it yet), it is an Intel HD issue and the workaround (disable SVIDEO support) isn't working for me anymore. Why Fedora? It works decently for college, cutting edge software + stable base. I am not 100% satisfied (bug reports usually go ignored, software choice isn't my cup of tea and swapping stuff breaks it in tiny, but annoying ways), but it is the best I have found. Somehow it is less of a headache than Windows 10 for me.

    I also have run Debian (I feel like it is not being properly maintained, lots of old software even on testing/unstable), Arch (package policy ends up in bloat), Void Linux (I quite liked it, but never ran it as my main OS) and had a short stunt with Gentoo (mostly installation, never set up a working desktop).
     
  8. Ryccardo

    Ryccardo and his tropane alkaloids

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    I do not find Windows as going against my desires (well, at least the versions I use - I hate 10)

    I don't have a gripe with proprietary stuff by itself, but I have one with stupid drivers that require me to install 32-bit support while producing larger-size, worse quality output than its equivalent for Windows - while (potentially) negating any auditability advantage a fully open software set would have brought (I don't care for this ability, directly: it's a matter of principle)
     
  9. Joom

    Joom  ❤❤❤

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    I have to agree with this. At least on the software part. SIP is a super pain, but it can be dealt with. As far as the hardware goes, don't buy Apple. You can
    build a very decent Hackintosh for half the price of a top of the line MacBook Pro. OSx86 has come far enough that you can go even cheaper and just buy an ideal OEM.
     
  10. kuwanger

    kuwanger GBAtemp Maniac

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    How many distros should a normal person use? :)

    PS - Personally, not counting trying out a Live CD or a VM for a short while, I've used Debian -> Mandrake -> Gentoo -> Xubuntu. Would move to a rolling release distro if I knew of a good one (that is, one that isn't insane to install (like LFS/Arch), latched onto a bigger distro and hence even more out of date than it is (Mint and one could argue Ubuntu), or nearly requires lots of compiling and has big shifting breaks at time (Gentoo)). *shrug*
     
  11. Blue_Mew

    Blue_Mew GBAtemp Addict

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    Dualbooting GalliumOS on my Chromebook, and have Ubuntu 16 on my dedi.
     
  12. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    I dabble in mint (cinnamon) from time to time. With valves 'play on Linux' I'm seriously considering making it my main OS.

    From other distros I tried, solus is the only one that comes close. I guess I should try it again since it was rather new when I first tried it.
     
  13. AmandaRose

    AmandaRose Do what I do. Hold tight and pretend it’s a plan

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    Work Redhat and QubeOS home mint
     
    Last edited by AmandaRose, Sep 10, 2018
  14. RaptorDMG

    RaptorDMG GBAtemp Regular

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    I recently switched from windows to linux mint because steam play allows me to play most of my games
     
  15. Y0shII

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    I use Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on my main laptop (dual boot with Win 7 Pro) and usually Ubuntu server 18.04 LTS for virtual machines along with Debian when needed.
     
  16. B_E_P_I_S_M_A_N

    B_E_P_I_S_M_A_N knows nothing

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    Arch isn't that bad when it comes to installation. Sure there's a bit of a learning curve to it, but all it is, really, is just getting a network connection set up, making the proper partitions, running pacstrap, and fixing up some post-install stuff.

    I've heard distros like Gentoo are much harder with the initial install, though, and I don't know enough about LFS to give an opinion on that.
     
  17. Joom

    Joom  ❤❤❤

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    Which can honestly be done in a single line. When I was going to school, I took a beginner's class to Linux because it was a requirement for information security, and I spent the time finding out how quickly I could set up Arch in a VM before the class was over. If Arch is too tedious, though, there's always ArchBang.
     
  18. kuwanger

    kuwanger GBAtemp Maniac

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    Uh, yea it is...

    The Installation Guide is pretty much a hyperlink nightmare. Compare that to Debian which actually tries to be a step-by-step guide instead of an attempt to exploit an extant wiki to fill in the gaps of an install. Gentoo as well is also a pretty straight forward guide trying to walk you through things.

    Of course you can go off unofficial guides or install methods, but then that rather proves the point.
     
  19. The Real Jdbye

    The Real Jdbye Always Remember 30/07/08

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    On servers I use Ubuntu Server or Debian but mostly Ubuntu since it seems to have slightly more up to date packages.
    I don't currently have Linux on any of my PCs at home but I normally go for Ubuntu with Gnome. Might try out Ubuntu MATE sometime.
     
  20. Joom

    Joom  ❤❤❤

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    Except it's not. I got my time down to ten minutes (faster than the Ubuntu installer, regardless of hardware). Like I said, it can literally be fully installed and set up with a single line command. The installation guide is a non-sequitur. You want a hard distro to install? Check out CRUX, the distro Arch is based on.
     
    Last edited by Joom, Sep 10, 2018
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