System transfer to A9LH

Discussion in '3DS - Flashcards & Custom Firmwares' started by Dethil, Aug 8, 2016.

  1. Dethil
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    Dethil Member

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    I recently bought a new nintendo 3ds xl with 9.4 firmware on it and I was planning to install arm9loaderhax using Plailect's guide. After that, I was wondering if I could system transfer stuff from my old 11.0 new 3ds so I could sell it.
    So, will it work and how?
     
  2. Quantumcat

    Quantumcat Dead and alive

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    Yes, you just do a normal system transfer.
     
  3. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Legend

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    install a9lh then system transfer.

    Also unless is a new 3ds it may not be easy to sell.
     
  4. Dethil
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    Dethil Member

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    The old one is a new 3ds xl, bought it also recently but failed to install arm9loaderhax on it. Got an error during the downgrade so I had to install 11.0. Didnt format it before the downgrade. Hope my next downgrade goes better..
    Btw, When getting new microsd card for 3ds, do I just copy the files from the old microsd to the new one to make it work?
    Edit: Also, theres no point installing arm9loaderhax to 4gb microsdhc, right?
     
    Last edited by Dethil, Aug 8, 2016
  5. Aroth

    Aroth GBAtemp Addict

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    Unless you have a RedNAND/EmuNAND, all you need to do is copy the files. If you have a RedNAND you need to use Emunand9 to setup RedNAND on the new microSD card, then dump your RedNAND from the old one and inject it into the new one. After that, just copy the files from the old card to the new card.

    As for using a 4GB card to setup A9LH, I would recommend against it. A "4 GB" card is really only 3.7 GB, and you will lose 1.2GB - 1.8GB of that to the RedNAND (required for downgrading to 2.1 as part of the A9LH setup), plus three 1.2GB - 1.8GB NAND dumps during the initial setup to downgrade (sysnand_original.bin, emunand_original.bin, and emunand_formatted.bin). If you are lucky and have a 1.2GB NAND chip, you can set up RedNAND and then still have room to create a single dump. At which point you would have to eject the card, back up the dump, and delete it from the card before you can make the next one. An 8 GB card would give you room to make a RedNAND and two dumps before having to make room, assuming a 1.8 GB chip. A 16 GB card would be ideal as it would allow you to make all necessary dumps, regardless of NAND size, before having to back anything up and make more space. Personally I would not recommend any microSD card smaller than 32GB for use with a CFW as games will fill that up MUCH faster than you would expect. You can use anything up to ~200GB without running into problems, as long as it is formatted as FAT32 with a 64KB cluster size. Cards bigger than 200GB have issues with .cia installers iirc.
     
  6. N7Kopper

    N7Kopper Proud lover of a three-inch girlfriend

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    A 4 GB card is a 4 GB card.
    However, it is a 3.7 GiB card - and most computers use kibibytes as their go-to means of checking capacity, even if they outwardly misinform the user that they're using kilobytes.

    RedNAND is unaffected by the NAND size of the 3DS it's being used on - it automatically uses the smallest size for that model.

    So don't worry about setting up on a 4 GB card. Sure, it might be a bit fiddly, but it's easily doable. The bare minimum, but good enough. It'll fit one or two large games on it, and also quite a lot of small ones.
     
    Last edited by N7Kopper, Aug 9, 2016
  7. Dethil
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    Dethil Member

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    Yeah, I am going to buy 128gb card for it later this week, so I think I'm gonna set it to the 4gb card first and copy the files to the new one later.
    Thanks for all your advices. :)
     
  8. Aroth

    Aroth GBAtemp Addict

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    "kibi-" is an unorthodox prefix that I have not seen in popular usage in some time. Your computer reports that 4,000,000,000 byte microSD card as "3.7 GB", not "3.7 GiB". In turn, it reports 4,294,967,296 bytes as 4 GB, not 4 GiB. I understand that the ISO specification for binary (2^x) data storage is to use -bi- instead of the standard metric, but most computer systems, software and hardware follow the JEDEC standard, which uses metric prefixes for common recognition.

    Was not aware of that, good to know.