Anyone tried this bootloader editing?

Discussion in 'Computer Games and General Discussion' started by Aijelsop, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. Aijelsop
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    Aijelsop Question Asker

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  2. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    I've never heard of it. Have you tried reading the neosmart forums to find out what people think of it?
     
  3. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    What's your reason for looking into this?
     
  4. ThePowerOutage

    ThePowerOutage The Lord of the Flyes

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    EasyBCD? Sure, pretty decent software, recovered my screwed up bl with it plenty of times. I also use it frequently for setting up dual boot systems, works fine.

    Plus in the extra software part, iirc there is a useful program for dualbooting called ireboot.
     
  5. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    I presume it's because of the other thread where he wanted to "uninstall" one of his XP installs. I suggested using bootloader tools to remove it then just delete the files.

    If this is the case, he really shouldn't have started up another thread about it. If there's some other reason... well, I'm sure he'll explain in his next post.
     
  6. Aijelsop
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    Aijelsop Question Asker

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    Well, that and my friend also has a bad boot I found out. His dualboot is giving issues like mine, not booting at all. He asked if I knew what to do.

    Does it install an iso as a dualboot? That would make my life really easy. XD wouldn't have to use virtualpc
     
  7. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    You can't edit your actual bootloader from within a VM.
     
  8. twiztidsinz

    twiztidsinz Taiju Yamada Fan

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    If the computers are running Windows Vista/7 and you have access to an install DVD you can do this:
    Code:
    bootrec.exe /fixmbr
    And if that doesn't work:
    Code:
    bootrec.exe /fixboot
    More information here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392


    Also, EasyBCD is an amazing bit of software and highly recommended by a lot of guides.
     
  9. Aijelsop
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    Aijelsop Question Asker

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    @Rydian, I don't mean it like that. I mean I install it on my harddrive bootloader, instead of virtualpc
     
  10. Urza

    Urza hi

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    Sure you can, assuming its on the file system in a location you have R/W access (which for all versions of Windows is the default).
     
  11. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    Within a VM?

    The closest I've seen is one of VMware's higher editions having the ability to mount an actual partition as a VM, and then it would only write to the partition, not the bootloader.
     
  12. Urza

    Urza hi

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    Uh, what?

    L2 bootloaders are generally stored on the file system of the disk/partition.
     
  13. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    What I'm reading is that he was thinking about running a bootloader editor in a VM and having it change the actual bootloader of the OS of his computer, NOT the one within the VM.
     
  14. Urza

    Urza hi

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    So he simply mounts the directory which the host OS' bootloader is stored in.

    What part of this do you not get.
     
  15. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    http://gbatemp.net/t280513-i-m-sorry
    I think you need to read your own thread again, because you're STILL posting like a dick.

    I'm bringing up something where I think there's going to be a problem and I'm asking for clarification, and you're posting stuff like that, which is DIRECTLY aimed at insulting intelligence or reading ability.
     
  16. Urza

    Urza hi

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    The host OS can simply bridge the target directory.

    It doesn't involve mounting partitions directly.
     
  17. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    Alright then, thanks for the info. I've edited GRUB before but wasn't sure if windows did the same thing or if they attempted to contain the entire thing (or important parts) in the MBR, given how little people usually think of the windows one.
     
  18. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    I used EasyBCD before, while it is good, it is not really beneficial. You can use EasyBCD to let Windows bootloader chainload other bootloader. Windows bootloader cannot directly boot other OS (besides legacy Windows).

    Example

    Windows Bootloader (MBR) > GRUB (/sda) or Windows > Linux or Windows.

    Advantage of this setup is that when you reinstall Windows, you do not need to reconfigure/rescue GRUB (provided that GRUB is not in MBR), since Windows always install bootloader in MBR. All you need to do is reinstall Windows and EasyBCD, reconfigure Windows bootloader and you are done.

    Disadvantage is that you have to go through 2 bootloaders to boot Linux (or any OS that uses GRUB).