A Serious Question About Homebrew

Discussion in 'General Gaming Discussion' started by Psychic_One, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. Psychic_One
    OP

    Psychic_One Newbie

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    Sep 24, 2013
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    Texarkana, Texas
    I am a computer science minor and math major. I have an interest in making my own game. I know it is not just a button you press. I would like to learn the process. What to do to start it out, how this all works, etc. I know you can't just press a button. Could someone give me a good direction and/or teach me how to make one? I have many ideas for my own game design. I just need help understanding how it works.


    Sincerely,


    Psychic One


    ps...Don't say "You're psychic, you should know."
     
  2. ilman

    ilman Gbatemp's Official Noise Eraser

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    Jul 25, 2010
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    If you want to become a professional developer, read onward. It will take a lot of time and effort to pull off, but, trust me, it is worth it.

    If you want to make any sort of program, learn a programming language (my language of choice is C++, but C# and Java are nice, too).
    Just don't get into learning an engine heads-on (like Unity) and steer clear of engines that use their own programming languages (I think Game Maker was such, not too sure), because you'll waste your time with a language you can't use anywhere else.
    What I say: go grab a good C book for beginners.
    After you're done with that(and have made a couple of small programs), look up and find a C-based language(like the mentioned above) that best suits you and a book about object-oriented programming on that language.
    Once you're done with that (and have made a couple of programs with your new skills), look up and find a graphics library for your language(for example, I use SFML for my programs, but OpenGL and DirectX are the standart) and find a book about that. Practice your newly-learned skills with some graphics-based applications and then you're ready to start making your game like a professional developer.
    Then, if you are really interested in certain functions and extras in a certain engine, you can start learning it(which will be much easier, since you'll sort of know what language it uses and how its graphical quirks work as opposed to jumping onto it head-on).

    Pretty much how it works if you haven't noticed already is read, practice, read, practice, read, etc.

    But you're a psychic, so I'm not sure why I typed this when you can read it from my head.