A few questions regarding No Man's Sky

Discussion in 'General Gaming Discussion' started by RemixDeluxe, Sep 2, 2016.

  1. RemixDeluxe
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    RemixDeluxe GBAtemp Psycho!

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    1. Could any charges be pressed against Hello Games or Sean Murray for the amount of false advertising that was made towards the final product?

    2. How much funding was put into this game? I know it took roughly 3 years to develop the game start to finish but I couldn't find any info on development cost.

    3. How did Sony trust a development team with a history consisting of two games? It just blows my mind that they got funding without any sort of credible reputation to prove they can make back their costs, let alone paid for console exclusivity.
     
  2. Tom Bombadildo

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    I forgot
    1. Could it happen? Sure. Will it happen? Probably not. There have been various instances of similar "false advertisement" lawsuits such as this happening with games, and those lawsuits went absolutely nowhere even at the best of times.

    2. We have no idea. No info on funding was released to the public, which is why you found no info on it. Probably a few million is the best guess, but that's about as accurate as anyone could be.

    3. Because they liked the idea of the game? If you look back at the promotional material and the demo builds of the game showed off (which is where a majority of the "missing" content claims are based on) you see that No Man's Sky could've been a pretty damn amazing game if it actually delivered. Sony took a risk, which is a thing every business does, and quite frankly it still worked out in their favor, financially speaking. The game has probably made Hello Games, and Sony, millions of dollars across both PC and PS4 sales. Despite everyone having a good ol' fashion hate wank over the game, a ton of people still bought it (and, in most cases, can't refund it).
     
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  3. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    1. Dude...seriously? Just ask for a refund if you don't like the game. Commercial talks have always lied, and quite often a lot more than in this case.

    2. considering the small team size (15), I think this is fairly reasonable or even pretty low.

    3. that's not a question but straightforward bashing. They trust the team because they had a project that sparked the imagination. And even with the mediocre to bad reviews, I dare say they delivered*. And before you disagree, you may want to check just how many game projects never make it out of development hell or are so ridden with bugs that it's unplayable. From what I can tell, all this game suffers from is overhype and overblown expectations.



    *again: 15 people. You want to compare that to the staff AAA-developers bring to the table?
     
  4. RemixDeluxe
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    RemixDeluxe GBAtemp Psycho!

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    I'm not bashing anyone?

    Would you fund a team that has barely any reputable development experience and realistically expect a return of profit?

    Just because my views do not reflect yours doesn't mean I'm "bashing" or "hating" I just wanted to know for curiosity and I don't even own this game, get the stick out from your ass before criticizing someone else's opinion.
     
  5. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    Okay...fair enough. Sorry. I'm just fed up with all the gamers who whine that the game wasn't up their unrealistic expectations, and I wrongfully assumed you were one of them.

    Still...your last question is a bit naive. Game companies (and especially distributors) always have to work with unfinished and/or unexisting material when they choose to fund something (if it's already finished and on the market, neither party needs funding). So as Tom mentioned, all they really needed was a good pitch and the believe that they could actually make what they said they would make.

    Let's break that last part up into two...
    First...the pitch. Yes, Sean communicated things in the press that clearly wouldn't be in the game and didn't correct that. However, all of that may have actually been in the planning and was decided to be cut because things weren't stable enough or would never work on a massive scale (it's not that hard to have 2 players meet each other, but a whole different ball game if thousands of people would have to be able to meet everyone else). And the other hand...there's a good reason I hardly ever follow prerelease conferences: they're basically commercials. In most cases, I just wait until the thing is ready and then read a couple independent reviews on it. And honestly: with the track record of the game industry the last couple of years, any other strategy is just setting yourself up for disappointment. However, things look even different from sony's perspective: they probably have played first beta's and had a much closer look at both the costs and what was made. And taking the team size into account and the amount of sales, I bet microsoft would still like to be in sony's position right now.

    Second...the reputation. Sure, we can google hello games and just find Joe Danger (which is a pretty fun race/parkour game, btw). But what does that actually say? With the gaming industry being what it is, layoffs happen all the time, and it's not like because the layed-off ones are lazy or incapable. Hello games is not the first small company that barely has any games out (fuck...they might as well be above average if you include all the indie studio's out there), but I'm sure sony took a good look at the CV's of the employees before deciding that, with funding, they could pull off the premise of no man's sky.



    Would you fund a team that has barely any reputable development experience and realistically expect a return of profit?

    As a consumer: yes. I've never heard of texel raptor but I got parkitect as soon as I could. Same goes for vertigo gaming. And those are still pretty reliable, as they post nearly weekly updates on their status. I've seen things being greenlit and crowdfunded with far less credibility.
     
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