Things PC devs should start doing

Discussion in 'Computer Games and General Discussion' started by FAST6191, Apr 15, 2008.

Apr 15, 2008
  1. FAST6191
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    Reporter FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Some people are predicting the downfall of PC gaming (again) so in the spirit of most forums I thought I would make a thread in the vain hope that some dev would read it one day and do something. On second thoughts that should probably be marketing droid rather than dev but hey.
    Most of my points are ages old and courtesy of me wasting a good bit of my life to learn electronics/computers do not frustrate me that much but I am going for general people that lack the time and desire to go the same path as myself.

    1) Reduce prices: I know PC games are already more or less the cheapest in the games world but films and the like seem to be doing OK despite costing similar amounts. It is known as disposable income for a reason and there is already considerable evidence games are up there with films and music as entertainment devices.

    2) Reduce requirements: by all means make a version that requires next years machines to run but as more than a few people have multiple PCs these days you can safely bet that they are either older or "just to go on the internet machines" that would happily run it if you just toned it down a bit. It has already reached the stage where people wait to play the games or construct elaborate tools (see stuff like oldblivion) to play. I would like to see less dependence on microsoft but we can work on that one later and as more than a few of your customers still use it and the "direct" stuff actually works you can quite safely hang on for a while.

    3) Leave in co-op mode: owing to points in 2) many people have networked machines (whether they know it or not) and when I pick up a game that has it on a console but lacks it on the PC I get more than a bit annoyed (especially when the PC version arrives later). Also you mean to say I can have a multiplayer game on a connection that is slower than most peoples networks were 15 years ago with 60 odd people playing a large level yet to have a friend or three playing alongside me in more or less the same room with a decent network is not going to happen?

    4) Mods: do not leave time between launch and mod tools and try and make them good. While Quake, Unreal, Half life, Elder Scrolls series and so on represent good forays into their respective genres it takes a mightily brave or uninformed person to argue their success owes little to user made modifications. Likewise try to cater to all levels of modder eventually (my opinion says go for the middle ground at first).

    5) Installation: I am all for simple stuff but allow me to rip it apart if I want when my machine inevitably does not conform to the "simple" method.

    6) coupled with 1) reduce copying incentive. Customers depend on technical types regardless and if you have pissed on them with system killing or generally frustrating copy "protection" you are not likely to win friends or business.

    7) Speak to the censors: if everyone else can buy a government group then so can you.
     
  2. CockroachMan

    Member CockroachMan Scribbling around GBATemp's kitchen.

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    I think the biggest problem here are the requirements to run a game :/

    This generation of consoles is way too powerful.. a VGA card that can do the same things the 360 can, costs at least as much as a 360... I remember when the PS3 was announced, people were saying that a PC graphics card at the level of the PS3 one, was around 2000 dollars..

    So.. since most of current PC games are 360 ports.. the hardware requirements are too high for the average consumer. On last gen, the difference between PCs and consoles wasn't that big.. I bought a Geforce FX5200 for around 70USD some months after it came out, and I could run every new game around.. Today, you can't play anything with a card that costs less than 150USD..
     
  3. Bob Evil

    Member Bob Evil The Department of Home-Made Insecurity

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    The PC games market suffers the most from piracy ...

    ... and the cost of new security measures isn't cheap ...
     
  4. fischju

    Member fischju Rehabilitated Jaywalker

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    They have to test the games on different operating systems, with different CPUs, GPUs, drivers, ect, ect, and that means the games will cost a lot. To compete with consoles, the graphics have to be as good. but many games can still be played on 4 or 5 year old machines, and the lower graphics settings.

    My 2 year old $800 PC can run most games on High (playing Assassin's Creed on high settings now)

    The issue is piracy. If you have a system that can run these new games, you probably have a) spent a crap load of money on it and b) know how to pirate the games.
     
  5. stormwolf18

    Member stormwolf18 GBAtemp Fan

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    Piracy aint the main problem.

    I would say ppl need to stop buying pc with integrated video card.

    Console games are killing the pc gaming industry. Just look at how bad Rainbow 6 vegas 2 is. Enemies spawning from nowhere, everything is so simplistic compared to the orginal R6, but ppl with 360 are enjoying that shit, even with a controller. I blame little kids for that. I mean, i aint buying this shit, its a fucking port of a console game, how am i suppose to enjoy a game made for a 12 yr old kid.

    That generation never played real games, they are enjoying crap, try to tell them that Doom is a better shooter than Halo 3, they gonna laugh at you .
     
  6. myuusmeow

    Member myuusmeow GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    They wouldn't laugh- they'd just say "the graphics suck" and won't play it.
     
  7. Bob Evil

    Member Bob Evil The Department of Home-Made Insecurity

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    It's true ... all the kiddies want now is shiny, shallow, short games ... they put framerate and polygon count above gameplay.

    You wouldn't catch them with a notepad and some graph paper, slogging away at an Infocom game for a month lol
     
  8. Panzer Tacticer

    Member Panzer Tacticer veteran human

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    Well I'm a wargamer, so I suppose my take on it is a peculiar one.

    All my games are seeming to be best served by digital download. I don't want a box, I don't want a manual, I don't want a disk.
    The box is nothing, the manual often says nothing (and a pdf manual usually looks better too), and a disk, well I can burn anything under the sun. I want my games cheaper, and I'm willing to ditch box manual and disk to get it cheaper.

    Protection. Well I'm here to tell you there is no such thing as protection. They might as well give up.
    I want a game that's just an installer file. I want the ability to burn it and store it where I please.

    People will download it, they might as well accept it. All protection does is make the REAL customers pissed off.
    Pirates play on ripped games, they don't suffer from protection schemes, only the honest do. Kind of tragic eh.

    The best they can do, is make the patches require a serial. Make the serials that are in the pirate domain dead on the first patch out. Not a perfect solution, but it seems to be the best I've seen in practice.

    Can't help you on video requirement, my wargames will play in old junk computers [​IMG]
    If I actually wanted to play the shooter and the graphics intensive type games out there, I'd likely be a console fan too.
    I don't really like constantly trying to "improve" my computer. I'd rather suffer with periodic console replacements. Not cheaper, just easier to figure out. You either want a PS3 or you don't essentially.
    My current system needs some new parts. Man my brain almost melts trying to figure out what the right choices are though.

    I'm increasingly becoming a champion of the hand held, simply because they focus more on the game being "fun" and less on the game being complicated. Can't speak for you, but computer wargames are rapidly approaching out of control.

    I don't hate paying 100 bucks for a good game if I want it. It's no different than 2 hohum average 50 dollar games where the wallet is concerned. But when I am unable to play the 50 dollar game, without buying a new 200 dollar graphics card, the equation isn't the same any more.
     
  9. fischju

    Member fischju Rehabilitated Jaywalker

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    Actually, it took almost 2 weeks to crack Bioshock's PC protection, and I guarantee many people bought it because of this.

    The market is continuing to evolve, without PC gaming developments (video cards, cpus, ways to use them in new games, ect, ect) consoles would be way behind. PC gaming is always going to cost more, and it is always going to look better.

    Also, shooters suck on consoles
     
  10. Psyfira

    Member Psyfira Credit: 0ml. Insert tea to continue

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    A lot of PC owners won't have the faintest idea what that means. And laptop owners are screwed; I know some laptops are sold without integrated cards but as a space saving measure I'm sure they're a minority. So PC games appeal to a very narrow audience before you even start chasing specifics.

    It's definitely the requirements that put me off. Usually they're too high, but you also have to admit it's a lot of faffing around picking a game you like then having to check up these figures (okay so most of us know our system specs off by heart, but many people don't.) Whereas if I buy something with "Playstation 2" written on the front I know it's going to work, no questions asked.

    Can't comment on cost, I don't have the faintest idea what a PC game retails for.

    Now I've put some thought into it, I really wouldn't lament the loss of PC gaming. Consoles already have networking and fantastic graphical capability, the only jump you'd need is to get decent keyboard/mouse control on one, slap a chat client on the side and you're pretty much sorted. Because at the end of the day unless you can tell me something I've overlooked* that's the main difference; some people just don't want to leave their keyboards behind. Consoles are specialist dedicated machines that do their job well, maybe "off the shelf" drops your geek-cred a bit but that's not the point of this discussion.

    (* there must be something, my argument's thinner than a sheet of wet paper [​IMG] )
     
  11. CockroachMan

    Member CockroachMan Scribbling around GBATemp's kitchen.

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    True.. not many people have the knowledge about video cards and laptops don't come with good video cards for gamming.. and laptops are becoming more popular.. [​IMG]

    IMO, video cards should be cheaper.. paying the price of a 360 for a video card, to play mostly the same games (which will probably still look better on the 360), is ridiculous..
     
  12. Bob Evil

    Member Bob Evil The Department of Home-Made Insecurity

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    Joe Public has been told by the manufacturers that laptops can be desktop replacements, so they buy laptops.

    Your average comsumer knows only what they are told ...
     
  13. fischju

    Member fischju Rehabilitated Jaywalker

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    The 360's graphics card is based on the Nvidia 7800, and there is no way a PC game on "high" looks better - you can enable AA and AF, and bump the resolution up a lot. $250 for an 8800GT 512mb - much more ram = much better textures.
     
  14. xcalibur

    Member xcalibur Gbatemp's Chocolate Bear

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    Yeah but there's a certain limit.
    Doom is just unplayable to most "younger" gamers.
    And I have to push myself to play through older games.
    2D games are fine but when you have pseudo 3D games that look horribly blocky you have to push yourself to keep going..
     
  15. stormwolf18

    Member stormwolf18 GBAtemp Fan

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    At the end, your console will look like a pc. so whatever...
     
  16. Bob Evil

    Member Bob Evil The Department of Home-Made Insecurity

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    lol you obviously don't know what an Infocom games is [​IMG]

    Most of them had nothing even resembling graphics ...

    Scott Adams & Steve Meretzky, where are you, when we need you the most?
     
  17. Bob Evil

    Member Bob Evil The Department of Home-Made Insecurity

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    Oh, and here's a snippet to explain who Scott Adams is ... and no, not the Scott Adams who writes Dilbert ...

    Who is Scott Adams?

    Scott was the first person to put an Adventure game (also known as Interactive Fiction) on a personal computer. This was in 1978 and the computer was a 16k Radio Shack TRS-80 model I. Scott went on to write over a dozen different adventure games for the personal computers of the 1980s. He is credited with starting the entire multi billion dollar a year computer game industry. Many people have written Scott and explained how his early games help led them into a career in computers today. Scott is 56 years old now and living in Wisconsin. He is married and has 5 children.
     

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