2 [Dumb] Questions, Downsampling and Overclocking

Discussion in 'Computer Software and Operating Systems' started by CompassNorth, Jan 21, 2014.

  1. CompassNorth
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    CompassNorth Denko (´・ω・`)

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    Hey dandylions, I'm not experienced with overclocking and I just wanted to know if MoBos plays a factor in GPU overclocking.

    It's a 970 MoBo which should be decent/good, but the thing is MSI decided to cheap out on the VRM heatsink for my specific model, I know this plays a factor with the CPU overclocking which is why I will not do a CPU overclock, not sure about GPU though.

    It shouldn't, right? It has it's own board after all.

    Also since my current monitor only support 1440x900 I was thinking of downsampling to 1080p. I'm getting a nvidia card so this should be easy, but this doesn't somehow ruin the monitor or GPU, right? Even if I play all games downsampled?

    Sorry for the questions. ;_;

    stay cool pewdiepie bros
    /brofist
     
  2. Celice

    Celice GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    You could still try an overclock on the CPU. Don't touch voltage, and just bump up its clocks and stress test along the way. If you're super cautious, once you find a stable point, back off a chunk. It will get warmer, but if you watch your temps and compare to what they are on average when under stress/load (like when you game or whatever), you can find a comfort zone for you.
     
  3. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    Graphics cards get most of their energy direct from the PSU, and have their own VRMs built in. Motherboards affect performance, but not overclockability of the GPU.

    No matter what resolution you play at, it won't "ruin" the monitor or graphics. However it's always recommended that you play at the native resolution of your monitor. It generally looks better that way.
     
  4. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    Why would you not want to touch the voltages? Of course you need to adjust them too if you want a stable overclock - they need to rise proportionally to the clock.

    A CPU that's working less requires less voltage, a CPU that's working more requires more of it. It's a delicate procedure, but it greatly improves stability post-overclocking, even though it's likely to lower the life expectancy of the chip itself. It's something you gotta grab a calculator for, really.
     
  5. Celice

    Celice GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    If someone is worried about getting way too hot on an overclock, or are not fully comfortable with the responsibility of adding more energy and heat to their processor in a bigger way than increasing clock, holding off on voltage increases is an acceptable way to go about it.

    I've easily hit 4.2GHz on my processor, as an example, without touching its volt, and it's been stable for a year, and 48 hours of Prime95. I can go higher by messing with the voltage, but I'm comfortable where I'm at now.
     
  6. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    Fair enough, I just wanted to point out that in the event of poor stability, adjusting the voltages appropriately is likely to help. :P Naturally everything is subject to careful calculation and testing, as you do with Prime. ;)
     
  7. CompassNorth
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    CompassNorth Denko (´・ω・`)

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    I could overclock it, but I really don't want to.
    I'm planning to a 990FX (GIGABYTE GA-990FXA-UD3), during the spring or summer, so it's not really a big deal for me.

    danke, may the pewds be with ye
    /maximo brofistico
    Warning: Spoilers inside!