Ubuntu Windows Dual Boot

Discussion in 'Computer Games and General Discussion' started by I2aven's_Sag, Jun 9, 2010.

Jun 9, 2010

Ubuntu Windows Dual Boot by I2aven's_Sag at 12:59 AM (2,738 Views / 0 Likes) 34 replies

  1. I2aven's_Sag
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    Member I2aven's_Sag GBATemp Otaku

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    Oh man, I've installed Windows twice in the last 2 days. The reason? Ubuntu. Before anyone knocks me off for seemingly criticizing Ubuntu, I'd like to say that I actually liked it a lot. However, contextually, I feel I was misled to believe that I had to create a separate partition for it when instead I could just optionally install it on the windows side in a manner of speaking.
    Anyway, I actually did like the program/interface, and I'll likely look into Linux more in the future, but installing this partition/ubuntu was a pain in the ass for me.

    It took me a long time to figure out that I couldn't just simply delete the ubuntu partition; that seems to screw up the boot up sequence (GRUB, specifically). (Hell if I care what GRUB is at this point though...)After re-installing ubuntu, back and forth I finally had the realization to install a "Windows Ubuntu"

    So my boot sequence was like this....

    (Choose Linux/Windows)----> Windows ---> Choose (Ubuntu/Windows 7)
    *Creating the Windows-Ubuntu Partition (Inside of Windows) allowed me to access my startup repair, which my Windows7-64 bit dell OS disk wasn't letting me get to.
    After a long hassle, I found the proper /fix mb command which fixed the boot sequence.

    After searching around for ages I finally found, http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/EBCD/Reco...er+with+EasyBCD Which has pretty much eliminated my problems, sans the fact that I have to re-customize my desktop for the 3rd time in 1-2 days / between reformats and what not.

    So I guess, what I've learned is that as an experienced windows user; the best way to install Ubuntu/Linux is through windows (as part of windows) rather than as a separate partition. On the other hand I really liked Ubuntu as a basic desktop OS standard. In many ways it can run windows for its money with its seamless integrations and "Plug-in-Play" application/installation. It's definitely an OS I'd consider a viable alternative to windows 7 basic. Ironically, if you install from within windows you get an easy uninstaller, which wasn't seemingly mentioned or emphasized anywhere.

    At this point, I really want to kick back and hit-up SNES FFVI (RPGOne Translation) as well as FEAR, Bioshock and anime. Man, what a nightmare uninstalling/getting rid of that partition has been.

    Now I just need to find a partition manager in hopes of figuring what exactly is going on with my partitions. Heh. The quest for knowledge does indeed hurt sometimes =O
     


  2. exangel

    Member exangel executioner angel

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    EBCD is so awesome, I am so glad they don't require paid licensing for it.
     
  3. prowler

    Member prowler Sony

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    Use gParted.
     
  4. I2aven's_Sag
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    Member I2aven's_Sag GBATemp Otaku

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    Yeah, I know prowler, thanks! That's what most of the help threads were recommending, but I kinda got frustrated over the top with burning ISO's, reinstalling and what not. It didn't help me much that I couldn't access the windows 7 recovery mode traditionally either. Quite frustrating.

    anyway, I'm back to normal sans the fact that I need to edit my bootmode so that HDD is first and not CD/DVD drive (it's asking me to put a cd on and boot from there) then it goes and loads up windows 7. Which is fine with me, I'll just have at it when I restart sometime later today.

    An Amen to that ExAngel, Amen, to that!
     
  5. Elritha

    Member Elritha GBAtemp Addict

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    Burning isos is so last decade. Much easier and faster to just create a bootable usb stick. [​IMG]

    Boot mode should easily be changed by changing the setting in the system bios.
     
  6. fabi280

    Member fabi280 GBAtemp Regular

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    Try using Wubi.
    Its a setup.exe for Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Whateverbuntu
    http://wubi-installer.org/
    You just have to start it, enter the Ubuntu Distribution, the Drive where it should place its virtual HDD, the Size of the Virtual HDD and your Username + Password.
    [​IMG]
    Then you have to get some coffe and wubi does the rest.
     
  7. mrSmiles

    Member mrSmiles mrSmiles {^_^}

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    i have Ubuntu installed through VMWare, runs smooth, so instead of having to go through the hassle of dual booting i can just open up vmware whenever i want to use linux
     
  8. Urza

    Member Urza hi

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    No.

    The "best way" to install anything is to do some amount of research beforehand, instead of fucking with your machine blindly as you seemed to have done, then making a thread blaming the software for your own incompetence.
     
  9. Maz7006

    Member Maz7006 iSEXu

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    just use wubi for ubuntu, never have to deal with partitions again !
     
  10. Advi

    Member Advi GBAtemp Maniac

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    Wubi is awful. The only time I've ever had annoying bugs with Linux (outside of installation) is with Wubi, because you can only have a tiny partition and you can't update. Also, no Lubuntu support.

    OP, use a USB stick or two and use UNetbootin. It can install ANY distro from an ISO image to a USB device for booting and installation that's much, much better for Live CD's and faster installs. You can even use stuff like GParted and Ophcrack with ease. If you ever want to boot from CD then you may as well boot from USB.
     
  11. I2aven's_Sag
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    Member I2aven's_Sag GBATemp Otaku

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    I'm not blaming the software, if it seemed that way I apologize. As I said in the original post, I do like Linux and I do plan on jumping back into it at another point in time. To be fair, I did look at several threads about ubuntu and added the absolute beginners guide thread filled with informative links to my favorites. I sincerely didn't mean to blame the software, more-so the information about the software itself in regards to partitioning in the eyes of a beginner. Either that, or I was just looking in the wrong places. I'm sorry.

    I figured that the best way to get a good look at something was to jump right in, I apologize I don't have a guru I can go to for help, knowledge and advice. I really would like one though. I simply did the best I could with the limited knowledge and skill-set I have. In fact, I was looking to see what other options people considered in regards to running Linux, however, I concede, in part that I did need to blow off some steam due to my incompetence with partitioning the C: drive.

    I would have liked to use my USB, but since I'm still living at home with my brothers computer things get lost unfortunately fast, it'll turn up eventually, and I'll be happy when it does.

    I'm particularly interested in MrSmiles comment as to running Linux/Ubuntu through VMware, if you could elaborate on that I'd really appreciate it. I know that VMware stands for Virtual Machine, I think it's pretty much emulation of an OS within an OS (Windows)(?) Correct me if I'm wrong, but please, do elaborate.

    Yes, wubi was the program that I used to install Linux/Ubuntu side-by-side on my windows 7. It also allowed me to access the windows bootloader with a top option of Windows 7 and a bottom option of Ubuntu; as well as access to the recovery console and the command prompt which was invaluable to helping me fix my partitions.

    So everything aside, what Linux Distributions to you guys like and why?
     
  12. mrSmiles

    Member mrSmiles mrSmiles {^_^}

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    Your better off going to the VMWare site, because im horrible at explain things, but you got the main point of it, just dont expect to play 3d games on them.
     
  13. Urza

    Member Urza hi

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    VMware is a company which makes virtual machine products.

    Essentially, the VM software ("Player" being VMware's free solution) creates a software implementation of a physical computer, and for all intents and purposes any OS you install within the VM will treat it as if it were one. It will create a pseudo hard drive file on your host computer which the VM will use as if it were a physical drive. Things like sound, ethernet, input, and storage devices can (and generally are by default) bridged over so software within the VM have access.
     
  14. Riley

    Member Riley GBAtemp Maniac

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    Fedora, my first linux and i will always stick with it.
     
  15. spas

    Member spas GBAtemp Fan

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    If you boot ubuntu 10.4 up and click install, it actually recognizes your win partition and opens gparted ready for you to choose the amount of space for the OS and automatically puts the grub loader in place! I could not believe how easy it was.
     
  16. I2aven's_Sag
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    Member I2aven's_Sag GBATemp Otaku

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    I don't know, it wouldn't let me install more than 12GB of space for some reason (this is the first time) When I went back and installed the Windows-Wubi version I had far more control over the amount of HDD space, rather odd, but I suspect it just has to do with the way my HDD was/is partitioned.

    Anyway, I'm going to go ahead and install it using Wubi. I like how clean and simple everything was for the most part. It's going to be fun learning how the file systems work and everything. I'm honestly excited now that I've figured out how to make Linux work for me [​IMG]. Thanks for all the help everyone.
     
  17. Elritha

    Member Elritha GBAtemp Addict

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    Once you're more familiar with the inner workings of Linux/Ubuntu I'd switch to installing it on an actual real file system.

    Wubi basically creates a virtual filesystem on a Windows partition. Meaning the virtual file will suffer the drawbacks of a Windows partitions also, such as file fragmentation. It's also more susceptible to hard-reboots than another file system.
     
  18. I2aven's_Sag
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    Member I2aven's_Sag GBATemp Otaku

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    Thanks for the input Edhel. So, what you're saying is that if it's on its own partition that it doesn't suffer from these drawbacks? Fragmentation, meaning that program/access and such is slowed down, (just like gradual erosion, really(?). I'm not sure what you mean by hard-reboots though. Either way, learning linux will probably take several months, so I won't have to worry about things too much. Currently, I gave Wubi a 30GB "partition", which was the biggest it allowed me to give it, though I was hoping on 40GB >.< lol. None the less this should be a good experience for me.

    edit: I need to finish Shakugan no Shana...I'm on ep 22/24 or something...(watching Monster mainly though).
     
  19. Am0s

    Member Am0s Mojo Risin

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    I use linux mint which is basically ubuntu

    Below is a way to get a dual boot windows and mint

    installing a dual boot or even a tri or quad boot is quite easy once you do the research on it, easiest way to get a working dual boot is,

    install windows making sure windows doesnt have the entire drive
    boot up the mint live cd and install, choose manual partitions and add partitions

    /boot 200mb ext2
    /root at least 15gb (system files) ext4
    /home large (user downloaded files) ext4
    /swap 2gb

    let it install and reboot and bang dual boot windows and linux.

    problem with windows is it like to take over the entire drive and installing windows on a linux partition screws up the windows boot up

    or you could just use VMware or virtual box, virtual box is like VMware but it is free and VMware is not

    I went to linux about 8 months ago and never looked back, for me ubuntu didnt work for me but linux mint did, linux is not just a run and click blindly as windows is, it requires research on many things but it very rewarding too.

    if you have difficulty doing the above or cant be bothered to do your own research then I would suggest you stay on windows
     
  20. Elritha

    Member Elritha GBAtemp Addict

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    I use Linux Mint also for my desktop. It's pretty much ubuntu with a few enhancements. For my netbook I use Ubuntu Netbook Edition.
     

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