Modular retro console Polymega to receive N64 support

polymega-em05-ultra-module-with-controller.large.jpg

Polymega is a retro emulation device that supports a number of older game systems, from the NES to the original PlayStation. The base unit comes with a disc drive that allows you to run games from disc-based consoles, such as the Sega Saturn, while "element modules" can be purchased separately and attached to the console to run cartridges. Currently there are modules to support the NES, SNES, Sega Genesis, and TurboGrafx-16. However, the company behind Polymega, Playmaji, recently announced an N64 module will be added to the lineup soon.

In an interview with Nintendo Life, Playmaji CEO & Co-Founder Bryan Bernal said that the N64 has been their most requested module, since there are very few options to legally play N64 games. While he can't guarantee perfect compatibility with all N64 games, he can promise "it will be at a minimum above 90% working great to near perfect." All Polymega modules also come with a controller based on the controller for the console it's based on, and this one is being developed by Retro-Bit, the company behind the Tribute64. Although, it won't be a perfect recreation. It adopts the look of a more traditional game controller and, as Bernal points out in his Nintendo Life interview, it has a 'SELECT' button, which N64 controllers never did, but this design will help give the controller more compatibility with other games and systems.

The new module is expected to release sometime in 2022, and will cost $80.

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x65943

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Do the modules contain chips to help with compatibility or are they simply for cartridge and peripheral slots?

If it's a glorified cart reader that's a bit pricy

Curious what this thing is packing - is it like android emulation?

Edit: answered my own questions

The system uses Intel chips and a custom Linux distro with open source emulators. The modules are simply to allow carts and controllers to plug in - no additional chips. This is software emulation.

The emulators used are: Mednafen, Mesen, Kega Fusion, and MAME with additional bug fixes, CD BIOS development, and replaced YM2610 for Neo Geo CD from Playmaji.

And here is the hardware specs:
Processor: Intel Coffee Lake S Series Processor
Memory: 2GB DDR4 RAM
Connectivity: Realtek RTL8822BE Wi-Fi / Bluetooth Combo Module, HDMI 2.0, Gigabit Ethernet, 2x USB 2.0, Polymega Expansion Bus
On-board Storage: 32GB eMMC Flash Memory
Expansion Storage: M.2 2280 SSD up to 2tb, Micro SDXC (MEMORY Port on back)
Optical Drive: 8X CD/DVD Slot-in Optical Disc Drive

Price is $450 and $80 for each additional module (but the modules do come with a controller). A bit steep for essentially a Linux box you could build yourself. Nice if you have a big cart collection. The system doesn't allow use of roms in any way.
 
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relauby

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Curious what this thing is packing - is it like android emulation?

In that Nintendo Life interview they ask the dude if it's running a custom emulator or a pre-existing one, and he gives a complete non-answer.

Part of our licensing and development / co-development process is ensuring that nearly all games can be played without any complicated configuration or set up by the user, and that you can plug a legitimate cartridge and controller in and play it without any hassle, plug-in flipping, configuration, and so on. So, when this module is released, it will employ the best legal solution we can provide while hitting the same minimum 90% compatibility requirement we have for our CD BIOS solutions and other supported game systems. The specifics will be released a little later on before launch.

According to the emulation wiki seems like it's using open-source emulators, sometimes modified, though.
 

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It's weird. They had an opportunity to get cheap emulation as a service/product and do it properly, which is what the industry has needed since forever but nah... "WE WANT ALL DE MONIEZ".
 

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In that Nintendo Life interview they ask the dude if it's running a custom emulator or a pre-existing one, and he gives a complete non-answer.



According to the emulation wiki seems like it's using open-source emulators, sometimes modified, though.
So he likely pulled a Hyperkin and lifted open-source code without giving credit. What a dick.
 
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I grew up on the 3 handle layout and let me tell you that the Hori N64 controller is leagues better than the original.

I played N64 when I was a kid and I never liked the controller, and it confused me how I'd hold the controller with two hands when it had three handles. :P

Nintendo 64 was a great console. Sucks it had no end labels, though.

if this was cheaper and did have some retailer on europe i would get one.
Amazon, perhaps.

So even if it's the U.S. Amazon branch, you can import, but keep in mind the customs so may end up costing $500 for an emulation box.

I read that Xbox Series X (and S, maybe?) are great to emulate old games via the Developer Mode ($20).
 
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