Figured out a way to use voice chat without the adapter

Discussion in 'Switch - Console, Accessories and Hardware' started by Dann_, Aug 1, 2017.

  1. Dann_
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    Dann_ Advanced Member

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    So, I was determined to either use all the audio splitters and crap that I've collected over the years to create a device like the adapter, or to make voice chat work without it and I found a really decent way to use voice chat without the adapter. All you need is a Windows PC (should be possible with Mac and Linux, the software used would be different though), a headset, a male to male 3.5mm cable and a way to plug your headset into your PC while still having a LINE IN (Microphone port) on your PC (If you have a usb mic then you don't need anything special, if you have 2 sets of line in and out on your pc then you're set too, if not you'll need some cheap usb audio adapter, I believe they're like 5 bucks).

    Here's how to do it:

    1. Plug your headset into your pc, make sure they are both set to the default audio device.
    2. Plug one end of your audio cable into your Nintendo Switch, and the other end into the microphone port of your PC.
    3. Right click the sound icon on the taskbar and select Recording devices.
    4. Right click your "Nintendo Switch" input, not your actual microphone and hit properties.
    5. Go to the listen tab, click listen to this device and select your headphones in the dropdown menu under the checkbox.
    6. Install your favorite Android emulator, I recommend Bluestacks since it actually works. The Nintendo Switch app needs API level 19 to function (Android 4.4 or higher) so make sure your emulator's android version isn't below 4.4
    7. Install the Nintendo Switch app either through the play store if your emulator has it, or through an apk file although I highly recommend you use the play store.
    8. You can now use the Nintendo Switch Online app, with voice chat through your PC while still hearing the sound of your Nintendo Switch.
    Pretty simple method but it took me a while to think of.
    I hope I helped someone :P
     
  2. planetarian

    planetarian GBAtemp Regular

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    A potential problem will be that this is highly dependent on the audio device/drivers in your PC. There are a number of devices I've seen which introduced a large amount of latency into the audio stream, so the sound you hear from the line-in/mic (i.e. from the switch) is actually delayed by up to half a second, which is basically unusable. YMMV.
     
  3. xile6

    xile6 GBAtemp Maniac

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    Hum what is this for??


    The app in on android and iphone.
    All you would need is a Y split cable.
    It would transfer sound from the system to the headset, and also transfer sound to your phone. The mic would sound would go into the phone also.

    If you take this cable and open it up. You can clip the mic wire on the end that goes from the switch.

    So with a $3 cable you will have.
    Sound from the switch to the headset
    Mic sound from the headset to the phone.
    Sound from the phone to the headset.

    There just no mixer but it will work.
     
  4. planetarian

    planetarian GBAtemp Regular

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    Don't do that.

    No, seriously, don't use a Y-splitter to combine two audio signals. It might "work" but it's not healthy for the devices sending the signals. Audio outputs are low-impedance power sources, and if you use a typical passive Y-splitter to combine the signals from two such outputs, they will also be receiving signal from each other, which can potentially damage them.

    Y-splitters are fine *as splitters* because it simply connects one output to multiple inputs -- audio inputs are high-impedance connections and are designed to handle incoming signals. Outputs are not.

    If you want to combine two signals like this, you need to use the proper hardware for it. There are Y-cables out there which are explicitly designed to combine (not split!) two signals, which have the proper resistor network inside them required to accomplish this without endangering the outputs. Alternatively, you could also find a small active mixer or similar. Just don't use a passive splitter if you value your hardware.

    More information:
    http://web.archive.org/web/20130625...ng_two_signals_into_one_is_not_a_good_idea/av

     
    Last edited by planetarian, Aug 14, 2017
    Selver and Jonna like this.
  5. Dann_
    OP

    Dann_ Advanced Member

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    Didn't know that :P , both my pc's are able to pipe the sound trough with minimal delay and In using the builtin sound card on my mobo, it's still worth a shot though
     
  6. LuigiGUy

    LuigiGUy Member

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    Definitely will try this. Thanks a lot.