Summer Reading Books

Discussion in 'Books, Music, TV & Movies' started by Gahars, Aug 14, 2011.

Aug 14, 2011

Summer Reading Books by Gahars at 2:24 AM (616 Views / 0 Likes) 5 replies

  1. Gahars
    OP

    Member Gahars Bakayaro Banzai

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    So, those of us here in some sort of school, what books have you been assigned to read/ have read over the summer? What did you think of them?

    I'm taking two English courses next year, an Honors and an AP (Liked both teachers, didn't want to pick between them, so I just took a third option), so I've had 5 books assigned to me.

    Dante's Inferno (Eng. 4H): The first book I read. Everyone knows the basic premise, and I have to say, I enjoyed it. The translation was really well done, and while the rhymes don't really match, it's understandable. Also, for a 300 page, 600 year old (or so) poem, I found it to be a pretty easy read. Go figure.

    The Scarlet Letter (Eng. 4H): Ugh. This one hurt. Apparently Nathaniel Hawthorne was paid per word, and if that is the case, it shows. The first chapter is 40 pages of literally nothing happening that has nothing to do with the main plot of the novel. The rest is somewhat bearable, but it is a pretty tough one to sit through. I would not recommend anyone read this on their own free time; I get wanting to have read one of the "classics", but some novels just do not age well.

    All The Pretty Horses (AP Lit): Written by Cormac McCarthy, who also wrote No Country for Old Men and The Road. While I enjoyed The Road, I can't exactly say the same for this one. First of all, the grammar is limited; no commas, quotation marks, etc. For whatever reason, in this book, it bugged the crap out of me and made it a chore to read, especially the first 30 pages. As for the novel as a whole, it is okay, but the characters aren't very memorable, and it feels like nothing of consequence is achieved or occurs. Not terrible, just meh.

    The Color Purple (AP Lit): Well... You know the old joke about the Lifetime channel, where all men are evil and just want to hurt women? Yeah, this book is that incarnate and then some. I mean, main protagonist is raped by her "father" in the first five pages. Seriously. There are only two, maybe, sympathetic males throughout the entire novel. As for the story, I found it to be dull, and none of the characters were very interesting. Also, "female empowerment" is a big theme, so if you want more from a novel, you are better off elsewhere. However, I will say that it is written in a similar manner to a diary, and that makes the book pretty easy to read. I'd say it is bad, but it could have been worse.

    Jane Eyre (AP Lit): So, this is the last of the books, and the one I am currently reading. I can't give a final judgement yet, but I can give you my impressions from halfway through the book. To be honest, I'm finding it pretty dull, but then again, I am not a fan of romance novels. It kind of feels like a female version of a Dickens novel in a way (Young orphan raised in an abusive environment, sent away to a tough school, etc.); at the very least, there are a few similarities. The writing style is antiquated, which can make it even more of a chore to read, though I get that it is almost 200 hundred years old, so I am not being entirely fair.

    Overall, I would have to say my favorite, by far, is Dante's Inferno.

    Anyway, those are just my (abbreviated) impressions of the books. Feel free to add your own.
     
  2. airpirate545

    Member airpirate545 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Crime and Punishment and the Poisonwood Bible. Haven't finished either and school starts in about a week [​IMG]
     
  3. machomuu

    Member machomuu Drops by occasionally

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    I have to read American Assassin and The Importance of Being Ernest.
     
  4. ShinyJellicent12

    Member ShinyJellicent12 I summon giant clover-shaped meteors in the sky

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    I read the Time Hackers, I read the Twenty One Balloons (but didn't finish the collage yet), and the Creator of Creepy and Spooky Stories (?) is out of print. No sweat, because I finished these books in under two hours. And I just need to put the stuff on my collage, and I'm all set
     
  5. Mazor

    Member Mazor Z80 master arch

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    This summer I read the book Halbblut by the apparently nationally famous (in Germany) German author Karl May. I read it in its original language and really don't think a good translation to any other language would be possible, particularly not one to English, which is explained below.

    This was some of the best shit I have read. The book is Western fiction from the 19th century. The story is serious, and the book could be attributed as a generic adventure novel. But here comes the interesting part: The main characters traveling around the Wild West are actually neither Americans, Spaniards, Englishmen or of any other nationality you would expect them to possibly be. They are Germans (to be exact, they come from the German-speaking parts of Europe today known as Germany).

    Even though it's written in a serious way to the point where it could be taken for non-fiction, the book is completely crazy. The premises given in the book for why there would be Germans riding around the wild west are all inplausible as fuck as the story progresses and more Germans come into the picture it gets completely ridiculous. And it gets better...

    Without further tl;dr I'll get to what really makes this book a masterpiece: All dialogue between any German and non-German character is not written entirely in German, but instead half in English. Not just any English, it's like Karl May travelled forward in time to take shit straight out of the Zelda CD-I game. We've got "My boy" in every other sentence, every shopkeeper sounding just like Morshu, and, I kid you not, even a literal fucking "Gee, it sure is boring [around] here".

    This book is a fucking god tier masterpiece. I would recommend people to learn German just so they can read this book.
     
  6. Hydreigon

    Member Hydreigon Isn't that DELICIOUS!?

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    I'm reading Beowulf(AP Lit.) and American Colonies: The Settling of North America(AP US History).
    I'm close to finishing Beowulf, but I didn't start on the other. School starts in exactly one week from today. [​IMG]
     

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