Just how much data does an amiibo keep (in Smash Bros.)?

Discussion in 'Wii U - Console, Accessories and Hardware' started by shinkodachi, Feb 1, 2015.

  1. shinkodachi
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    shinkodachi On permanent leave

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    I've kept wondering about this and I hope someone has played with amiibo enough to know the answer: just how much data does an amiibo keep about your play style? The reason I'm asking is because I stumbled on this thread (specifically, post #5): http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/633202-super-smash-bros-for-wii-u/70895185. And it made me realize some people take training amiibo in Smash Bros. seriously, so is there an actual benefit to training amiibo in a specific way?

    I think what I'm asking is: does amiibo really hold enough information to play as you would, and is that limited to your preferred moves only or does it look for other cues in your play style? So if someone plays very defensively and trains their amiibo to level 50 while someone else plays very offensively and trains their amiibo to level 50 as well, will the two amiibo fight differently when put against each other?

    If we keep in mind that amiibo uses NFC technology and there's realistically 8KB (perhaps less) of information to be stored in general, I just can't believe amiibo can hold so much information on your play style to apply it to its own AI as if you truly "trained" it.

    My experience with amiibo is very limited as I only have Villager and no other amiibo thus far. I've fought against my amiibo with various characters and I've noticed it uses mostly cheap techs when I fight against it. When I play as Villager against it, I never use the techs it uses. So realistically, have I just played with cheap techs against it, or is amiibo at level 50 just a harder CPU fighter than at level 9?

    Further, when I play against it with my main (Ness), I always use the same combo with PK Fire > rush in and Dgrab > jump and Fair > double jump and Fair > Fair while landing (usually beyond the level at this point) > PK Thunder to recover. When my opponent is at about 140%, I'll use Ness' backthrow for a guaranteed kill near the edge. No matter how many times I play like this and save the data after the match back to the Villager amiibo, it just never learns to protect itself from that. I can be easily punished when I'm trying to recover with PK Thunder and both characters are in the air, since Villager can pocket the projectile leaving me fall to my death. So am I just stupid or expecting too much out of a plastic toy?

    Thanks for any pointers.
     
  2. TheConfuZzledDude

    TheConfuZzledDude Member

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    From what I've heard and seen from others (I don't actually own one), it seems they just work on move frequency, so the more they see someone using a certain move (e.g shielding, dodging, specials), the more they'll start to use it. So if someone shields and dodges a lot, they'll do the same, but they won't mimick combos or start learning counters to certain moves, those are just part of the core AI that the game uses. If I'm correct about that, then the amiibo won't require much data since it just records percentages (about 7 bits) for each move, plus name, level and stats.
     
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  3. shinkodachi
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    shinkodachi On permanent leave

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    Thanks for the reply, this is possibly all the information there is on this particular subject.

    And just as I expected, there's not much to amiibo in Smash Bros. It really begs the question why one should put effort into training amiibo in the first place. Just pit it against seven 9 level CPUs in 8-Player Smash and it'll level up to 50 in no time. If an amiibo learns to use particular moves in higher frequency, that trait seems essentially useless because as you said, the general AI in the game handles everything else from combos to counters to recovery.
     
  4. TheConfuZzledDude

    TheConfuZzledDude Member

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    I guess using some moves more often will affect how the AI plays in some cases. For example, you wouldn't want a Fox to use the Fox Illusion all the time, so by using it less, it will only use it when necessary for recovery.
     
  5. OriginalHamster

    OriginalHamster UStealthy

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    Anecdotal evidence, I trained my Samus by playing her against myself, then I have Mario who trained with lvl50 amiibos only, when Mario reached near lvl50 he was constantly winning against other amiibos, so either Mario character have best overall track record over other characters or it was influenced by playing (and mostly loosing) against higher level amiibos.
     
  6. Mushkin

    Mushkin GBAtemp Regular

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    i think theoy can only hold data for one game