I might've "bricked" my PC. lol

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by KanterZ, Dec 10, 2016.

  1. KanterZ
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    KanterZ YouTuber, Modder. I also do SOFTMOD Services

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    So, I dismantled my PC.
    removed all of the parts on the case to clean it.

    Now that I've put it all back, the fans are running, sure but plugging in the monitor doesn't work.
    The monitor doesn't seem to sense any signals. Additionally, the ethernet cable doesn't blink/light any colors. Any help?


    Oh, here're the photos of the PCs that I've put back together.
    http://imgur.com/a/t0mx5

    PS, I found that some of the pins on the CPU slot are bent.. Not all, not most, just some.
    Is it because of that?
     
  2. TotalInsanity4

    TotalInsanity4 GBAtemp Supreme Overlord

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    Yes, that'll do it. Very carefully try to bend them perfectly vertical with a pair of tweezers
     
  3. KanterZ
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    KanterZ YouTuber, Modder. I also do SOFTMOD Services

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    So just an update, I fixed the LED lights for Power and Ethernet Cable now but... Monitor still doesn't pick up lol.
     
  4. Gizametalman

    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    It may have burned.
    You see, Motherboards holds static, and let's say that you have your PC on, then turned it off, and then opnened the CPU carcass, and then you touch something (i.e. a Fan) the remaining Static could make it recieve a small electric discharge.
    That's why every single time you attempt to hold a circuit with your bare hands, you MUST rub the Motherboard surface with an Eraser, or use an Anti-Static Bracelet.
     
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  5. Memoir

    Memoir A Hero to Zero

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    It seems more like the bent pins on the CPU slot. Rather than a static problem.
     
  6. Gizametalman

    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    It could be too. But the CPU Pins are a bit delicate. Very easy to break if you apply excessive force.
    So be careful if you try that.
    Do not use Tweezers. I recommend you to use a Flat Head Screwdriver, and just push the pin to the side you want to bend it.
     
    Last edited by Gizametalman, Dec 12, 2016
  7. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    If you removed your CPU and did not put new thermal paste on it and between the heat sink, you will fry the cpu. Its only a few dollars for the paste. There is still a chance that you didn't fry it, but my money is on the fact that it's dead if it was left on for more than a few seconds. Never take apart your pc to clean it. A can of air is all you need. If you don't have that, use a straw to blow out the dust, but be careful you don't blow spit on everything. Go buy some thermal paste and put it on before you try to start it again. Most newer motherboards will turn off or try to go into protection mode if the cpu gets too hot, but usually by then its too late.
     
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  8. derkiederk

    derkiederk Advanced Member

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    You made 2 big mistakes. Removing the CPU unnecessarily risking bending the LGA pins is very silly and could be your problem.
    You also appear to have powered up the motherboard while it's resting on bare metal on the side of your case, potentially shorting out dozens of components all at once. Even if you did manage to straighten out the pins there's probably plenty more invisible damage done.

    You'll just have to take it as a very expensive lesson. When you buy new parts, don't reuse that power supply, it's clearly of very poor quality and potentially dangerous.
     
  9. nitrostemp

    nitrostemp GBAtemp Maniac

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    try another ram stick/slot, having a msg speaker is also a good way to find out what is faulting
     
  10. Gizametalman

    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Hey, now that I remember, once I had that trouble. (by "once" I mean about 10 years ago)

    I learned that my Monitor didn't turned on because the Fans. They weren't working normally, which caused the CPU to shut down immediately.
    Tell us something.
    Unplug everything (Monitor, USB's and Keyboard, etc.)
    Then Turn on your CPU, and watch the fans.
    If your fans stop spinning, and your CPU turns off, then more likely you just de-composed your Fans.
     
  11. sarkwalvein

    sarkwalvein More coffee, please!

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    I really don't understand how people bend their CPU pins. They are designed to only fit in the correct position, almost foolproof.
    I remember somebody frying his CPU by connecting it rotated, back in the 80486 days, when they could actually fit in more than one position. Nowadays they are supposed to be foolproof.
     
  12. viral777

    viral777 mecha connoisseur

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    lol, be careful.
     
  13. derkiederk

    derkiederk Advanced Member

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    I've seen it done. With modern Intel chips the pins are on the motherboard sockets, some 1155 of them, they are tiny and very fragile. If you fumble the chip into the socket it's easy to bend a few dozen of them. Fixing requires a magnifier, a small pin and the hand stability of a surgeon.
     
  14. Yil

    Yil GBAtemp Addict

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    I broke my first motherboard with that. I think a business card will do.

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    I try to put the cpu in with the socket on the first time.
    Edit: What I mean is the plastic cover plate on top on the socket. MSI don't pop off like ASUS.
     
    Last edited by Yil, Dec 14, 2016
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  15. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    I was a professional tattoo artist for 20 plus years. Because of that type of work I have rock steady hands. Because of sitting for 12 or more hours a day i f@cked up a lot of tendons in my hip and can no longer tattoo. For the last few years I have made a living doing electronic repair. I can build and work on computers, but there are a million pc repair men/women on every block. So therefore I mostly repair TV's, stereos, game systems, and so on. There are a couple of pc repair shops around my neighborhood that I do work for when they run into hardware that needs to be fixed. Mostly replacing the cap's on mobo's that are worth enough to repair as opposed to replacing. They also call me when they have a CPU, or mobo with bent, or even missing pins. They always ask me how I am able to straighten the pins. They never believe me, but I tell them the truth, as I know they won't be able to do it even when I tell them how I do it. I use one of my head mounted lamp with magnifying lens. I then use a very tiny pair of tweezers with plastic tips designed for electronics. This is where all those years tattooing comes in handy. If the pin is broken off then i cut a pin off of a spare CPU. Then I push it into to correct hole on the mobo. Then I take a TINY, TINY drop of jb weld. Just the black part of the mixture. With no hardener mixed in. I put that tiny drop onto the very top of the pin that I have pushed into the corresponding hole in the mobo. Then very carefully set the CPU into the socket and clamp it in with the lever. It almost always works. I hope that made sense. I replied to you and not the OP because of your statement about needing surgeon hands.
     
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  16. linuxares

    linuxares GBAtemp Psycho!

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    OMFG please, please don't say you started the computer when it was ON the case? If so, I absolutly know your problem.
     
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  17. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    I honestly cannot tell you how many computers I have received for repairs that had the mobo fastened directly to the chassis without any standoff's. What surprises me even more is the fact that most of them worked just fine after installing the standoff's. You could see where voltage arc had occurred. I'm sure it had shortened the life span of the product though. It just goes to show you how well built most of them are. Most people now days get their first learning experience about electronics with arduino's. One of the first lessons is that most electronic boards run on either 3.3, or 5 volts. Any more than that and the magic blue smoke appears and that board will never work again. There are however circuits that you can incorporate into the board you are designing to protect it from things like over voltage, reverse polarity, high current draw, and so on. Components like self healing fuses, and diodes whose only purpose is to only allow electricity to flow in one direction are also things that you will find on quality motherboards. These are the things that a more expensive, higher quality motherboard will have over a cheaper competitor. So when people are trying to make an informed decision before buying computer parts, it's not always apparent as to what the differences are. They might both have the same specs as to speeds and architecture, but won't tell you about all the extra protection circuits, or even the quality of the components. You wouldn't believe how many very expensive TV's i repair that are really nice, except that they tried to save a few dollars by using cheap electrolytic capacitors. In fact it is such a problem that you can buy "cap kits" for most newer TV's. Just go to Amazon and search for cap kit. If you want to know how well built your tv is, go to Amazon and type in your TV's model number followed by "cap kit". You will find a cap kit for almost every TV made now days, but if the TV is known to fail often you will find a LOT of cap kits for the same TV from a bunch of different manufacturers.