Need help with my N64

Discussion in 'Other Consoles & Oldies' started by adamshinoda, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. adamshinoda
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    adamshinoda GBAtemp Fan

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    I just purchased an N64 from my friend. It's an US region one. Its adapter is 110 V but my electrical socket is 220 V. I forgot and plugged it in directly and BAM!, the adapter was burnt.
    So I went buy a new one and plugged it in a converter first before plugged in the socket. The power came up just fine, the LED went red. But now the problem came from the AV cable. I plugged it in the console first, then the TV. When I plugged the yellow cord (the video out), a spark appeared ! This time the power didn't come up until I removed the cable (?)
    I tried another AV cable, it was getting even worse. Strange noise like electric buzz came from the console and moments later, there was a burning smell. I removed the cable immediately and see the smell coming from the connector. Maybe the cable had been broken, I don't know, I was scared to plug it in again.

    So, does anyone have any idea what the problem with my N64 is?
     
  2. Xexyz

    Xexyz GBATemp's™ Official Xexyz

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    Why did you make 3 threads?
     
  3. J-Machine

    J-Machine Self proclaimed Pog champion

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    your "friend" didn't warn you or supplied you with what you needed to prevent this? anyways sounds like you wrecked the capacitors and now the power is not being regulated at all causing further damage. you'll need to open the n64 and look for damage.
     
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  4. omgpwn666

    omgpwn666 Guy gamer and proud!

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    Obviously he lagged.
     
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  5. adamshinoda
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    adamshinoda GBAtemp Fan

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    Sorry, the wifi connection is poor. Please reply in the newest thread.

    you mean it's the old adapter which cause this?
     
  6. Xexyz

    Xexyz GBATemp's™ Official Xexyz

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    Ok I understand know. ;)
     
  7. jax604

    jax604 Advanced Member

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    Hopefully the "converter" you're talking about is actually a step up transformer, not just any normal converter. But it's probably too late, the moment you plugged the n64 into the wall socket without a transformer, somewhere in the n64 is damaged.
     
  8. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    False - the power adapter in the N64 (and in fact all the console adapters I know including internal ones) is fused and it's very unlikely that the motherboard is damaged - overvolting the system simply breaks the fuse and should not cause further harm. Any problems he's experiencing now are problems that the system previously had.

    If this is an old system, it may have capacitor problems (electrolite leaking and damaging the PCB or simply not working according to the specifications) but it's going to be hard to determine the cause of the problem without opening the system and checking its innards.

    Dear OP, can you provide us with a detailed (preferably Macro mode) photo of the PCB of the system or at least have a look at the components and check for anything unusual? What I mean are buldging or leaking capacitors, any burn marks or anything out of the ordinary?

    That, and a quick lesson for the future - never turn on old electronics without previously opening them, checking their physical state and removing dust which may short the device if it's present in excess.
     
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  9. Kouen Hasuki

    Kouen Hasuki Kouen the Cyber Husky

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    Open it up and check for damage I would say
     
  10. adamshinoda
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    adamshinoda GBAtemp Fan

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    Well I don't have proper tools right now to open up the console so I can't make a photo of the PCB. But I'd checked it and found no burn marks or anything out of the ordinary. No burning smell anywhere.

    Did anything happen to my AV cable? Is it OK if I use it for my SNES now? (In fact, that "burning smell" AV cable is in my SNES set)

    One more thing, I heard that if the capacitors are damaged, there should be some "oily" thing leaking out but I found nothing like that at all.
     
  11. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    The "oily thing leaking" is electrolite and there's not a whole lot of it - it would stain the PCB, but shouldn't leak out of the case so if you can't verify that, we'll have to assume this part of the solution as "unresolved" as we can't check their state without tools.

    The AV cable is fine - the amount of voltage passing through it is minimal, however the smell indicates that it probably shorted at some point of its length - most likely the plug. It's "okay" to use it in the sense that it will not cause any harm.

    The buzzing sound likely comes from the transformer - it's normal for old electronics to emit some noise, but if it's particularly loud it may point at transformer damage - it will have to be replaced somewhere down the line.

    Here's what you should do, in order:
    • Verify that the converter you have provides the appropriate amperage. You don't need much, but at least 2A would be welcome. You'd be wise to use a step-down converter here as previously mentioned.
    • Verify that the power supply you have is both compatible with your system and working. Check the voltages and the amperage.
    • Verify that the system works fine when not connected to the TV. Be extra-cautious and turn it on - does the LED turn on at all? Can you verify that the system functions? Mind you - technically you shouldn't be doing this without opening the system.
    • If you think it does work then turn it off, connect an A/V cord that doesn't smell to the system and the TV, switch to the correct channel/mode and turn it on - again, be extra-cautious. A spark just means that two terminals which shouldn't have touched each other have touched each other.
    If you experience the same issues then the worst might've happened and the fuse did not break before some damage occured - you will have to open the system and have a look.
     
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  12. Kouen Hasuki

    Kouen Hasuki Kouen the Cyber Husky

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    Oh and in testing use a game you can afford to lose like Fifa 98 or something better not to test with your copy of Conkers Bad Fur Day or something good

    I Killed a copy of "Alien Storm" for Sega Master System this way and always regretted it
     
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  13. adamshinoda
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    adamshinoda GBAtemp Fan

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    It's time to dig this old thread cos of the goddamn N64.

    OK so now I just buy another one, US region, this time I plug the adapter through the converter. When I flick the power switch, the game appears on the screen just right, nothing happens to the picture, but now the problem comes from the sound. It keeps making an annoying buzzing sound in the speakers. At first I think the AV cable is broken so I use another one, but the problem still remains. I try to play Super Mario 64 for a while but the buzzing sound never stops, it angers me; and I'm also afraid that something is happening with the electricity so I turn the N64 off.

    Can anybody help me with the issue this time?
     
  14. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    Re-check the connection, clean all the plugs and ports and re-try. If all else fails, check the caps on the motherboard, but if those were busted, the system would buzz too.
     
  15. javanni9972

    javanni9972 Member

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    Are you sure that he didn't sell you a broken n64
     
  16. Foxi4

    Foxi4 On the hunt...

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    This is a thread was last active in January - whatever problems the OP may have had with his N64 are probably solved at this point.