Formatting emuNAND option eats up MAXIMUM SD Card space.

Discussion in '3DS - Flashcards & Custom Firmwares' started by Icy, May 20, 2015.

  1. Icy
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    Icy Member

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    Is this a thing?

    Both of my SD Cards have their sized greatly reduced after an format emunand option using Gateway launcher.

    My 2GB SD card became 911 MB

    My 4GB SD card became 2.77 GB

    Or am I missing something?
     
  2. DarkKaine

    DarkKaine GBAtemp Regular

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    Yes, this is normal.
    It creates a new partition which holds emuNAND.
     
  3. Icy
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    Icy Member

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    So there's no way to access those "partition" back? I'm thinking 1GB is too big but it's fine anyway.
     
  4. tarovisions

    tarovisions GBAtemp Regular

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    Nope, has to be that size to match the real nand if you were wondering
     
  5. Icy
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    Icy Member

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    Oh I see. I was curious if they stacked since I formatted the emuNAND like a quadruple times before.
     
  6. Nollog

    Nollog GBAtemp Addict

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    Gateoway will always create the emunand partition at the same memory position.

    There's a program somewhere here what someone made to make it so you can have more than one emunand on a single sd card.
     
  7. RodrigoDavy

    RodrigoDavy GBAtemp Maniac

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    SD cards are really inexpensive nowadays even in my country. Buy an SD card with higher capacity and you should be fine
     
  8. Typhin

    Typhin GBAtemp Fan

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    This is normal, yes. Your emuNand resides in a separate partition on the card. The partition doesn't show up normally because the computer doesn't know how to read from it, but you can see it using a partition manager (such as Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Disk Management in Windows). This partition will be around 1 GB in size, and you can use the emuNand Tool to easily extract/restore it for backups. If you are no longer going to use the SD card in your 3DS, you can reclaim the space by redoing the partitions, Windows has a utility called Diskpart that can do this, and guides should be available pretty easily.

    Each time you set up emuNand, the Gateway launcher clears out all partitions and sets them up again, so you only ever have one emuNand partition, you won't be losing a GB each time you do it. Trying to format the SD card through Windows only resets the "visible" partition, and won't touch or reclaim the emuNand partition's space.

    I'd still recommend getting a larger card so you can have more room for installed CIAs, especially the larger ones, but that's a personal preference thing, I suppose.

    I hope this helped answer your questions. If you have any more, please go ahead and ask them, and I'd be happy to help out.
     
  9. Icy
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    Icy Member

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    Thank you for the help everyone.

    I'm going to buy a 16GB SD card sooner or later. I was using the original SD Cards that the 3DSs came with.
     
  10. pdensco

    pdensco Banned

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    you can formate partition through Fat32Formatter
     
  11. MelonGx

    MelonGx GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    Panasonic SD Formatter can restore the size.
     
  12. Typhin

    Typhin GBAtemp Fan

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    There's guides on moving an emuNand from one card to another, but it's pretty easy.
    - Use emuNand Tool to grab the emuNand off your old card
    - Use "Setup Emunand" to partition the new card properly
    - Use emuNand Tool to inject the emuNand onto the new card
    - Copy all files from old card to new card
    Done. Extra space, and nothing gets lost.