1. Yol Morefi

    Yol Morefi Advanced Member
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    Nintendo have to attack datel for having killed the online !
    And C.O.R.E. will not support Wifi at all [​IMG]
     
  2. Wintrale

    Wintrale GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    It's for the better, seriously. The online would just be a ruined experience.
     
  3. .:Crimonite:.

    OP .:Crimonite:. GBAtemp Regular
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    Personally, i think wifi would be a bad idea. I dunno, maybe they could make like, a co-op? Not sure how well that would work, without knowing the story line..... Yeah, i think its best just to leave it with no wifi and, unless they have a really good idea, no multicard\single card play. If i were making this game, i would probably only go as far as putting in a demo download, like in Prince Of Persia: Fallen King.
     
  4. zanxy

    zanxy Advanced Member
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    WEll if it wass co-op like L4D it would be legendary game, but since this is not possible ? or is it ? Its better with no Wi-Fi
     
  5. Yol Morefi

    Yol Morefi Advanced Member
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  6. Wintrale

    Wintrale GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    [​IMG]

    *drools*
     
  7. jgu1994

    jgu1994 GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    For those who don't feel like reading, some key points are
    -you can jump and crouch now
    -melee weps like sledge hammer and a knife
    -flash light and weapon can be held at the same time
    -a new save system and monsters only respawn in certain important areas
    -DS cart will be twice the size as the first release
     
  8. Wintrale

    Wintrale GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    Aka a 128Mb game.
     
  9. .:Crimonite:.

    OP .:Crimonite:. GBAtemp Regular
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  10. MyauChanDesu

    MyauChanDesu Kamineko is GOD.
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    oh wow. Dementium 2, the first one killed my life. haha. i love it
     
  11. .:Crimonite:.

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    NINTENDO POWER SPECIAL FEATURE: DEMENTIUM II
    08-25-09

    Nintendo Power's Steve Thomason gets mental with Dementium II in his multi-page "head case" feature this month.

    "The sequel to the top-rated horror adventure for Nintendo DS promises to mess with your mind and scare you out of your wits."

    [​IMG]
     
  12. sphere9

    sphere9 GBAtemp Fan
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    Is there any more of that article? It seems like it is missing a bit.
     
  13. .:Crimonite:.

    OP .:Crimonite:. GBAtemp Regular
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    nah, sorry. thats the whole thing.
     
  14. Frederica Bernkastel

    Frederica Bernkastel GBAtemp Psycho!
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    can't wait.
    Boxart is....
     
  15. .:Crimonite:.

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    Dementium II Impressions

    Next year's sequel to one of the DS system's big first-person shooters is a bigger and meatier experience.
    by Craig Harris

    US, September 8, 2009 - The amount of first person shooters on the Nintendo DS platform can pretty much be counted on two hands, but that doesn't keep an excellent one from shining through: Dementium: The Ward was one of the early shipped Halloween 2007 to modestly decent sales. It was a mature title for a platform that seemed to skew younger, so for those looking for a little grit and gore in their portable experiences, Renegade Kid's title was a refreshing alternative to the expected. The team took its tech in a sci-fi direction with Moon released in 2008, but for its third DS title Renegade Kid's returning to the mature with a sequel to Dementium: The Ward called, of course, Dementium II. And even though it's not scheduled for release until early 2010, we had the opportunity to check out its progress this afternoon.

    The story within Dementium II seems to be completely independent of the happenings from the first game, so those that haven't jumped into the original experience won't be lost. In fact, the storytelling seems to have been given a stronger focus as well: the introduction feels like it spells out your situation a lot better than the mysterious and vague viewpoint from Dementium: The Ward. At the start of the game you wake up on a table in a bit of a daze – you're told that you've undergone brain surgery and have been out for days. You're well enough to be wheeled back to your cell, and you see this all first-hand through well rendered cutscenes. This is where the adventure begins: sitting in your cell, you're suddenly "teleported" to an alternate world -- a hellish version of real life – and this is where you make your escape through the hallways to figure out what the heck is going on.

    Much of Dementium II, at least in gameplay and programming tech, is built upon what the team created for the original 2007 release: you still control the game through stylus and D-pad combination from a first-person perspective, and the visuals run and incredibly smooth 60 frames per second. Many of the complains that we made in our review of the original game appears to have been addressed for the second go-round. For example, you've got an on-screen map that automatically notes where you've been and where you still need to go. You can now dual-wield weapons along with your flashlight, but if you have a weapon that requires two hands you lose the ability to shine your torch on the surroundings while you hold that weapon at the ready. And best of all, the limitation of the original game's respawning creatures after leaving and returning to a room has been fixed for the sequel – there will be instances of respawning enemies, but you won't lose your progress fighting through a horde of horrors if you accidentally walk through a door and come back.

    The game's touch-screen controls have also been given a tweak or two. Switching weapons is handled through a slick drag-and-drop interface that instantly freezes the action when you're changing weapons. Players can jump by double tapping on the screen or by tapping on the "up" arrow on the touch screen – crouching through low overhangs can also be performed by hitting the "down" arrow with the stylus.

    With all the tweaks given to the sequel we can forgive the development team for leaving out one feature that was in the original Dementium: The Ward: the ability to write notes on the touch screen.

    This is only a brief look at the game as Renegade Kid still has a few months of development to go. Hit the media link to check out new screen and artwork of Dementium II, and watch for additional coverage on the game as we get closer to its 2010 release.

    MORE SCREENSHOTS [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Put screencaps in spoilers for dial-up users [​IMG]
     
  16. .:Crimonite:.

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    It's Always Darkest Before Dawn - by CCC's Tony Capri

    September 18, 2009 -


    True to their namesake, Renegade Kid is one of the few developers determined to serve up edgier content on the Nintendo DS. After receiving accolades for both the survival-horror adventure, Dementium, and Moon, a sci-fi, first-person shooter, the game makers have once again put their noses to the grindstone to piece together another thrilling ride on the popular handheld system.

    Dementium II is a direct sequel to the first game, featuring the same focal character, William Redmoor. Redmoor is a patient at the Bright Dawn Treatment Center (a loony bin), and after undergoing radical brain surgery, he finds himself slipping in and out of an alternate reality - a grim and gruesome world reminiscent of Silent Hill.

    For those who haven't experienced the first game, Dementium is an adventure played from the first-person perspective, and if there's anything that can be said for the team at Renegade Kid, it's that they are masters of mood and mechanics. Taking inspiration from Metroid Prime: Hunters (DS), the first Dementium was an incredibly polished machine in terms of controls and atmosphere. Renegade Kid creative director Jools Watsham promises fans a sequel that retains all of Dementium's finest gameplay components, while discarding elements that didn't quite work out the first time around.

    One particular issue of the first game folks were quite vocal about was the almost-broken save system. Though you could essentially save anywhere throughout the adventure, if you died, your save data would be automatically deleted, thrusting you back to the beginning of whatever chapter you happened to be playing through. The folks at Renegade Kid were quick to listen and react to fan feedback, and Dementium II will contain a liberal number of hard-save points, making the adventure much more conducive to gaming on the go.

    Other improvements include a Metroidvania-style map - located on the touch screen - that will continuously update your progress. You'll know which areas you've already explored, where locked doors and/or blocked passages are located, and overall, the process of exploration should be a lot less tedious in this latest tour through Dementium's insane asylum.

    Additionally, players will be able to make better and more plausible use of both hands in the sequel. Use of a flashlight was an integral part of the first game, both from a gameplay standpoint and in terms of being a powerful mechanic for setting the mood. In Dementium II, you won't be forced to pack up your flashlight when wielding single-handed weapons, though opting to do so will allow you to dual-wield or carry two-handed firearms, such as a shotgun.

    Dementium II will feature a slew of new horrors, but unlike the previous outing, you won't always be forced to contend with monsters when revisiting certain areas of the game. Combat seems to be about on par with the first game, and heck, if it ain't broke… There are a couple of fresh additions here, however, that should make the process of negotiating Bright Dawn's not-so-bright halls even more entertaining. You'll be able to jump and kneel - both actions mapped to arrow icons located on a side panel of the touch screen. Swapping out weapons has seen a subtle (though novel) change as well; instead of merely clicking on equipment tabs, players will drag the items to the character's hands using the stylus.

    Though Moon and the first Dementium offered excellent mechanics and controls, both games were somewhat lacking in the story department. With a better command of the Renegade game engine, the developers are setting their sights higher for Dementium II in terms of narrative and story structure. The creators hope to offer a more compelling and immersive adventure this time around, though the story will still be told mostly through clues and notes found along the way.

    It's impossible to understate just how much of an integral role the presentation played in making the first Dementium an interesting and, ultimately, scary experience on DS. Running at a solid 60 frames per second, the graphics were crisp and detailed, offering a visual experience many handheld gamers were hungry for. With even more variety and depth than before, Dementium II is looking like another stellar production from this three-man team of technical wizards. Character models are gruesome and grotesque, and fans will be treated to all-new environments that make great use of the game's realistic lighting.

    Tying this journey through hell together is a moody selection of themes and sound effects that intensify as the gameplay ramps up. Renegade Kid knows the importance of great audio when attempting to offer a terrifying experience on the handheld, and it's yet another element of Dementium that makes this series a cut above the rest. Though the first Dementium had a handful of minor issues, the game still managed to awe us with an incredible attention to detail. With a tiny development team and a shoestring budget, Renegade Kid managed to pull off something truly impressive on DS. According to Watsham, the team had been finishing up the fundamental structure of the game last month, readying themselves for fine-tuning and tweaking (joolswatsham.com). With a greater focus on story and solid level design - coupled with the same polished mechanics and audio/visual prowess of the first game - we very much look forward to Dementium II's release sometime in the early part of next year.

    By Tony Capri
    Cheat Code Central's Freelance Writer
     
  17. .:Crimonite:.

    OP .:Crimonite:. GBAtemp Regular
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    The last few days have been full of updates. Just to keep them all neat, each update will have its own post. Also, there is a new trailer out. For those of you who want to watch it, uts on the first post in this thread, under the old trailer. Prepare your eyes and get out your reading glasses (if you have them) coz theres a hell of a lot of reading ahead.
     
  18. .:Crimonite:.

    OP .:Crimonite:. GBAtemp Regular
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    Dementium II Hands-On
    By Sophia Tong, GameSpotPosted Oct 27, 2009 2:47 pm PT

    It seems like zombies are always involved when we wake up in a strange place with no recollection of how we got there.

    When done right, the heart-pounding and sweaty-palms experience of a horror game can be achieved on a handheld as on a console. Dementium II is a follow-up to the survival horror game Dementium: The Ward, which was released two years ago on the Nintendo DS. SouthPeak stopped by our office to give us a quick look at the sequel and go over some of the changes that have been made to enhance the bone-chilling experience. This is developer Renegade Kid's third first-person shooter on the DS, so it's using the same engine that was used for the game Moon earlier this year.

    Like the first game, you play as William Redmoor who wakes up in an unknown place without his memories. However, this time, you're in an entirely different place and your amnesia can be attributed to something else--like brain surgery. Not that this is any more comforting, but the story does pick up immediately after the first game as you try to piece together what just happened. You don't need to be familiar with The Ward to play the sequel, and it won't spoil the ending of the first game for you, so anyone can jump right in to start exploring the mysterious facility.

    The opening is a bit of a blur for our character because he is in a drug-induced state as he's dragged from a hospital bed and tossed into a wretched-looking prison cell. Before we could truly admire how despicable our sleeping quarters were, our environment suddenly changed into a warped, sickly green parallel universe where creatures had giant gaping mouths for their faces. The only weapon available at this point was a rusty-looking shank, which fit our needs for the moment. Later in the game, you'll come across more weapons, as well as a trusty flashlight. One of the changes that has been made is that you can dual-wield your flashlight with any one-handed weapon so you're not left in the dark in certain areas. Other weapons include a sledgehammer, makeshift flamethrower, pistol, and shotgun--just to give you an idea of what to expect. As we made our way through the strange-looking corridors, our vision blurred again and we were back in the prison. But this time, we were outside of our cell. Using our small blade, we slashed our way through a few guards and moved on to a room full of problematic patients.

    Saving has also been tweaked so that the game now autosaves as you walk through a door, in the event you have to turn off your DS in a hurry. There will be more checkpoints throughout the levels, so you don't have to backtrack too much if you die. Another nice feature is that you can now carry health pills rather than use them instantly or wander around levels when you're in dire need of some. The first boss we fought was a bizarre creature that was basically a huge mouth lined with sharp teeth; it also had four limbs. It would scale the walls and ceiling, then try to pounce down on us. But, then, it would scurry away so we had to run after it. After taking some damage, it would vomit some kind of toxic waste that came with annoying slugs and spew poisonous gas all over the place.

    The controls are similar to the previous game, but now you have jump and crouch buttons on the touch screen. You can double-tap to jump as well. The map is now conveniently located on the bottom screen, so you don't have to bring up another screen just to get your bearings. To run, you press the D pad twice in any direction, although it can sometimes be difficult to see how fast you're actually running. Apparently, in hard mode, your speed is dramatically decreased, which will make it a challenge to avoid or run after certain bosses. If you've been playing shooters on the DS, then the mechanics should feel very familiar.

    Three difficulty settings are also available to you if you want to give yourself a challenge, but there are definitely some tricky bosses in the game that are tough to beat on a lower setting. We had an opportunity to hop into a later stage to tackle a crazy witch that would dart at us in the dark. The flashlight wasn't a huge help, but sound waves appeared onscreen to give us a clue as to where she'd show up next. Her red eyes gave away her location, and we had to time our slashes carefully to hit her. If that wasn't bad enough, as we whittled her health away, she eventually fired multiple beams at us to prevent us from getting too close.

    We played with headphones to listen closely to the sound and music, which changed depending on our situation. A dynamic sound system is in place to make the experience similar to one that you would expect on a console. Visually, the game isn't going to compare to a console, but it does an excellent job of providing a disturbing atmosphere for you to explore. As you wander through various corridors, you'll come across puzzles you have to solve in order to continue. In our example, it was a sliding puzzle where we had to shuffle jars around until they were piled up in the right order on the other side of the screen. Some doors were initially blocked, but you can return to earlier areas and later break them down with a sledgehammer.

    It looks like Dementium II will have all the tension and gore that fans enjoyed from the first game, so if you're looking for a suspenseful experience as you wait in line or ride the bus, look for the sequel when it is released next February.
     
  19. .:Crimonite:.

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    NOTE: BEWARE OF SPOILERS!!! IF YOU DON"T WANT TO SEE THEM, STOP READING THIS POST!

    Going to Hell and back in Dementium II
    1:59 AM on 10.28.2009, Hamza CTZ Aziz

    Dementium II picks up right where the last game ended; however, you don’t need to know what happened in the first game to enjoy the sequel. The game begins with main character William Redmoor waking up in a recovery room. A nurse tells William that he’s been out for a few weeks after undergoing brain surgery, and that she has taken William back to his cell -- oh yes, you’re in a prison. More specifically, the Bright Dawn Treatment Center, which is located in a small town in Michigan.

    As soon as the player is given control of William, the game sends you into an alternate dimension. This happens throughout the game -- you’ll be jumping back and forth between the real world and this Hell dimension a lot. Everything in the Hell dimension has a different look and design compared to the normal world. For instance, the bars that were keeping you in your cell room have a little opening now. You’ll find yourself hesitant in using this opening, though, as there’s a guillotine right above it.

    The entire touch-screen interface has seen a vast improvement compared to the original Dementium. L or R is still used to shoot, the D-pad/face buttons are used to move (double tapping the buttons will let you run) and you’ll move the camera with the touch screen and stylus. In the center of the touch screen is now a mini-map showing where you have and haven’t visited. Below the map is your weapon and item storage. When you go to select a gun or item, you’ll touch and hold the inventory button and then slide the stylus to what you want. The game pauses when you’re in the inventory and resumes as soon as you lift the stylus from the screen. On the right of the screen is your reload button and an up/down arrow. The up arrow makes your character jump (double tapping the screen also jumps) and the down arrow lets you crouch.

    After crouching to get out of the cell, you’ll start to make your way forward, where you’ll come across your very first weapon, the shiv. You’ll be able to hold ten weapons at a time, including pistols, shotguns and flamethrowers. You’ll still have a flashlight that you need to use, but it won't take up a weapon slot now, and it’s possible to dual-wield the flashlight and weapons. But there are some weapons that you can’t dual-wield with the flashlight, such as the sledgehammer, which can also open up blocked passageways.

    Once you have the shiv, you’ll encounter a few Chest Maw enemies seen from the first game. There are around a dozen new enemy types on top of all the bosses; the Chest Maw and the Mollusca (worm-like creatures) are the only ones being brought back from the first game. You won’t have to worry about enemies endlessly respawning like in the first game, either. Once a room has been cleared, it will remain clear upon revisiting the room.

    As you make your way forward, a cutscene takes place, showing someone being hung by his arms from the ceiling. A couple of doors then open, and you get your first glimpse of the first boss as it runs through the room, eats the guy in one bite and runs away. As you’re fighting in this Hell dimension, you’ll come across a lot of -- and this is the best way I can describe this -- fucked-up shit. One room had a guy on a table as chains were being forced through various parts of his body. After moving forward a little more, William is then transported back to the normal dimension, but it’s not safe here, either, as there are prison guards out to get you.

    Back in the real world, I came across a red vortex, which is where you can save your progress. The saving system from The Ward was the number-one complaint about the original, and Dementium II completely solves that issue by having the game auto-save every time you’ve gone through a door. So there's no more back-tracking through the entire level if you die. Saving at the red vortex points will fully recharge your health, and you can now store health pills in your inventory, too.

    You’ll eventually come across a operating room where you’ll meet the main baddie of the game, The Doctor. The Doctor tells William that whatever was in his head is now loose on the entire place, but before The Doctor can finish talking, the player is popped into the Hell dimension again and an evil version (more eviler version?) of the Doctor greets you. He basically talks some shit to you and then sets loose the first boss of the game. The boss is rather easy, but it takes a while to kill, since the only weapon you have is the shiv. The creature can crawl on the walls and ceiling, attacks you with its claws and occasionally vomits up Mollusca at you.

    After defeating the boss, your goal is to get out of the prison. Along the way, you’ll come across some new enemies, such as the black cloud-like creature called the Whisperer (think Lost's Smoke Monster.) It will slowly hunt you down wherever you move, and it can’t be killed. You have to avoid it at all costs -- if you touch it, you’ll instantly be transported to a room where several Chest Maws await you. After defeating the Chest Maws, you’ll be transported back to the same room, where you can try again to get out. The audio quality in Dementium II is superb and you’re doing yourself a giant disservice if you don’t hook up a surround sound system or use headphones to listen to the audio and music. I seriously got creeped out by the Whisperer as it whispered spooky things.

    Renegade Kid is really pushing their engine in Dementium II, and we’ll see a lot of different environments this time around. After getting out of the prison, you’ll set foot in a forest as snow falls. Your next goal is to get to the nearby town’s cemetery, where you have to dig up the grave of your dead daughter. Your wife has told you that you need to get your daughter’s body and bring it back to a specific location. You are literally using a shovel to dig up graves in an attempt to find your daughter’s body. You have to dig up the right grave, too; otherwise, you’ll get attacked by enemies. After you’ve dug up your daughter’s grave, you find a doll in place of her body. You now have to take the doll and place it on an altar; upon doing so, a giant blade comes down on the body and blood comes pouring out of the doll. It’s at this point that you, the player, start to really question your sanity. Was this really a doll? How could a doll bleed like this? Which dimension is the real one?

    You don’t have much time to think this over, though, as the next boss in the game comes flying at you. That blade that pierced the doll is now usable -- it’s supposed to be the weapon that can really harm the Wendigo Witch boss. There will be a number of limited-time weapons like this; you’ll discard them once they’ve served their purpose.

    The Wendigo Witch boss takes place in a completely pitch-black room. The witch will fly at you from a random direction, and you have only a couple of seconds to figure out where she will be coming from. There’s an on-screen prompt that will clue you in, and her eyes glow red (you can see them off in the distance before she strikes). The witch can also have these walls come up from the ground that will hurt you on impact and make you drop your weapons. The goal is to strike the witch with the special knife, but halfway through the battle, I realized the shotgun worked a hell of a lot better in inflicting damage on her. Towards the end of the battle, the witch completely disappears and you see your wife crying on the ground. As you get closer to her, she turns into the witch and strikes at you. I knew that was going to happen, yet I still jumped in fear when it did. After the battle, the witch transforms back into your wife and you’re not sure whether she really was your wife or really the witch this whole time.

    Dementium II will really fuck with your mind. The first game mostly just creeped people out, but Dementium II really wants to make players question their every action. Renegade Kid once again pushes the DS to its limits and I can’t wait to pick this up next year. There’s going to be around 12 hours worth of gameplay including some light puzzle elements, all running at 60 frames per second. Three difficulty levels and a survival mode round out this horrific package.
     
  20. .:Crimonite:.

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    Dementium 2 Hands-on Preview
    By Neon Kelly - 29/10/2009 - 12:17pm GMT

    Let me tell you, I've had a real ball-ache of a day. I woke up this morning with a killer headache, with no idea where I was. This pretty nurse tells me that I've just had brain surgery, but that I can't rest up because they need the space for someone else - that's the NHS for you! Anyway, these two guys in riot gear dragged me back to my room where my crazy-ass cellmate was babbling a load of scary gibberish.

    Things got worse from there. I found a postcard that I apparently sent to myself (never a good sign when I do this), warning me that I had to escape. Then everything went a bit mental, and someone redecorated the hospital with this unsightly peeled-bodies-and-rusty-chain motif. All day I've been hounded by these freaky guys with mouths in their chests, and by these ugly worm things that squeal like babies. Thank God I keep finding painkillers all over the place; I must have chowed down eight bottles, and now I'm tripping my tits off...

    Oh well, at least I have Dementium 2 to cheer me up. Unlike their film-based equivalents, video game sequels tend to be an improvement on their predecessors - and the new game from Renegade Kid is no exception. Indeed, that's a massive understatement: the Texas-based developer has taken everything that was good about the first game and made it even better, resolving the few flaws that were present and then throwing in a whole load of new tricks. And on the basis of the two chapters I've played so far, I'd say this could easily be one of the best DS games I've played all year.

    Like the first game, Dementium 2 is a FPS survival horror that finds you battling demonic abominations inside a run-down hospital. The player takes the role of William Redmoor, a damaged and possibly schizophrenic hero who's just "had some work done" at Bright Dawn Treatment Center. It was eventually revealed that the whole of the last game took place inside William's head, but it soon transpires that real life is just as nightmarish, if not worse. Are you crazy, or is there a good reason why everything has gone all Silent Hill? We just don't know yet, but to find the truth you'll need to fight your way through a new set of freaky-looking nasties.

    In broad terms, Dementium plays in exactly the same way as the last game - kill lots of monsters, search every room for health and ammo, and occasionally solve a puzzle to access the next area. It's a classic survival horror template, but the big draw here is quality. My last preview covered a lot of the changes to things like the inventory and save systems, but with hindsight I didn't make a big enough deal of how great this game looks and sounds. If you want an easy point of comparison, you need only look at the Chest Maws - the zombie-like creatures with vertical jaws on their torso. Last time around they were merely an odd-looking threat; this time they're genuinely nasty. When they open their massive gobs you can see a rotting heart lurking inside the chest cavity, and when they stumble towards you they move with a creepy, juddering motion.

    A similar degree of detail has been applied to your surroundings. In the last game things got quite samey, but this time there's plenty of variety between each area. As a result, Bright Dawn Centre actually feels like a proper mental hospital (or a proper dilapidated mental hospital, at any rate). As it turns out, Bright Dawn is only one of many environments you'll encounter. The first chapter wastes little time in dishing out cool stuff, serving up your first boss and three separate weapons within the first half hour of play, but it's doesn't take long before you escape to the outside world. At the start of Chapter 2 you'll find yourself standing outside in the snow, with white flakes tumbling down all around you. It's a startlingly pretty moment, particularly if you're well versed in the claustrophobic maps of the last game. Still, it's not quite as startling as what you'll find yourself doing about half an hour later, shortly after picking up a spade (i'm not telling you; you'll have to see it for yourself).

    As nice as the new graphics are (and they really do look great), I'm even more impressed by Renegade's work on the audio front. The first Dementium gained a lot from its clever use of sound, but I was still taken aback by the spread of brilliant noises in this sequel. From the barked threats of Bright Dawn's guards to the sinister mutterings of a Russian prisoner, everything has a role to play in contributing to the game's atmosphere. Many of these effects work well with particular gameplay aspects. Since you have to manually reload your revolver by tapping a button on screen, it's quite easy to empty all six chambers; should this happen you'll hear a panic-inducing click. And since each of your enemies makes a distinct noise, you'll often know what's waiting for you around the corner... unless, of course, you're hearing something entirely new - in which case you'll probably lay a brown egg in your pants.

    While we're on the subject of enemies, it's clear that you'll be facing a far wider selection of monsters during this second outing. Along with the Chest Maws, you'll be pleased to know that two old friends have made a comeback: the flying skulls and baby-voiced worms have both returned to the fray. Other creatures you'll meet include a four-legged monster with two faces that laughs hysterically and spits at you, and a winged ball of flesh that makes a drilling noise as it dives into you. There's also a mad doctor who appears to be your ultimate nemesis, taunting you over Bright Dawn's PA system in the manner of BioShock's Andrew Ryan.

    So yes, Dementium 2 looks and sounds great - but it also has a habit of surprising you. There's a great example of this early on in the game, where Renegade Kid abruptly changes the rules to take the player out of their comfort zone. You've just found the sledgehammer, a meaty weapon that floors most foes, and as a result you may be feeling quite confident. Then, all of a sudden, you meet an enemy that can't be killed - a smoky black ghost that whispers your name over and over as it slowly drifts towards you. If it catches you it'll teleport you to an arena filled with enemies, and so your only hope is to run away through a maze of sewers. You'll have to find your way through a brand new area, jumping over pipes that block your path and making blind guesses when you reach a fork... and all the while the whispering phantoms will be at your back.

    In case you can't tell, I'm rather impressed with Dementium 2. This is Renegade Kid's third entry into the FPS genre, and it now feels like the team is hitting its stride. There's no confirmed release date yet, but we'll certainly let you know when we get one; if you own a DS, this is definitely a game that should be on your radar.
     
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