1. cosmiccow

    cosmiccow Original Hippie
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    I wasn't very impressed from the first Dementium game. It was very repetitive. It felt like they were too limited by their 3D engine.

    But could it be that this new one is much more varied, with better monsters and more interesting shit going on? I think this sequel will be three and a half times better. It might just rock.
     
  2. Dueler

    Dueler GBAtemp Regular
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    They combated 1 handed flashlight syndrome with flashlight + knife?
    lol.... bit of a shit compromise there.... they could have done pocket light style like silent hill :\
     
  3. .:Crimonite:.

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    It's not just the knife, its all single handed weapons, including pistols and other such things. They were trying to add to the realism. I mean, can you imagine finding a torches to strap on to every gun you come across? Just like in Quake 4 (if you've played it) the pistol and the assault rifle both had a light built into them, but the nail gun and the shotgun and the grenade launcher and everthing didn't. So, if you wanted the flashlight, you swapped to a gun that had one. In that same way, if you want the extra fire power in Dementium, you're going to have to make a compromise.
     
  4. basher11

    basher11 GBAtemp's Official Vocaloid Lover
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    im so getting this game. the first one scared the shit out of me. XD
     
  5. Raika

    Raika uguu
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    Damn, this game sounds good, but...... I didn't even play most of the first game, since I was scared out of my wits by the freaking game... Meh, I blame myself for playing this with earphones on in the night when everyone was asleep... Hmm, I don't think I can take this one, I'll most likely faint out of fright.
     
  6. Ireland 1

    Ireland 1 GBAtemp Advanced Fan
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    That boxart looks savage.
     
  7. benjaminlibl

    benjaminlibl Funky Member
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    I hope it's better than the first one. The first one was kinda weird when it came to distance perception.
     
  8. Rayder

    Rayder Mostly lurking lately....
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    I found the first one to be a little creepy, but not scary in any way. This 2nd one should be quite an improvement because the first definitely had its issues.

    I wish they would make a Silent Hill game for DS. Should be pretty easy to do what with the fog limiting the view to nothing anyway.

    But you know, this game will be rated M most likely, and those kinds of games never sell well on the DS.
     
  9. .:Crimonite:.

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    Dementium II
    By Neilie Johnson on the 29th of October 2009

    The DS isn't exactly known for M-rated games. According to recent Nintendo TV commercials, led by the slogan, “I play for me”, the DS is the gaming device of choice for women who play things like Brain Age or Nintendogs. Hardcore gamers and DS enthusiasts alike know this isn't true, but what is true is that there's a serious lack of mature titles for our favorite little handheld.

    In 2007, this E-rated trend was broken by survival-horror game Dementium: The Ward, a title that put gamers inside an abandoned mental hospital. With its dirty, rust-covered environments and mutated monstrosities, Dementium was like Silent Hill writ small. It was atmospheric, gritty, terrifying—and frustrating due to issues with controls, save points and respawns. Fortunately, enough buzz was created about the game to motivate developer Renegade Kid to create a sequel in which we're assured, the first game's many problems have been addressed. I got to demo Dementium II this week and am happy to report that as of now, the game's low on frustration and high on horror.

    The demo was heightened in a way few demos are, by being held in a spectacularly creepy historic building. Leaving the bright sunshine outside, I was swallowed up by gloom upon entering the building's lobby. I was greeted by a grim elevator operator who took me upstairs in an old metal cage elevator that had to be a hundred years old. I was let off and directed down a cavernous, twilit hallway fronted by rows of closed doors and couldn't help wondering what madness was occurring behind them. My destination—a small office where I was shut into a pitch-dark room, just me and Dementium II.

    In The Ward, you played a man trapped in an abandoned asylum. Similarly, in Dementium II you play William Redmoor, a man who's recently had brain surgery in hopes of curing the psychosis brought on by his wife's murder. You wake after having the surgery and are led by guards back to your unbelievably grungy cell and shortly thereafter, all hell breaks loose. Alarms going off and guards running to and fro make it plain something's gone wrong at this questionable “treatment” center.

    The first part of the demo was a tutorial, showing me how to run, jump, crouch, fight and look at things. After finding a disturbing postcard from myself, telling me to get out of there, I ducked under a now-open cell door and went out into the empty hallway. Finding a knife, I made my way down the hall and through a door, only to watch a gruesome scene wherein a ravaged-looking man suspended upside down from the ceiling was suddenly snatched and eaten by a grotesque, fanged creature. Realizing my survival depended on getting the hell out of Dodge, I ran toward the elevator. Not working.

    Turning my back on the elevator, I saw some stairs, dashed down them and ran in and out of random rooms collecting health vials and reading disturbing hospital documents. That sounds so easy doesn't it? Did I mention that the entire time I was fighting off hostile guards and horrific humanoid creatures with gaping mouths in their chests?

    Let me stop here and say that if you've never plugged your DS into a good sound system, you've gotta try it. Sound is half the experience in a game and Dementium II takes good advantage of it. The game constantly switches between real-world mode and a hellish psychosis mode seemingly brought on by your obviously unresolved mental problems. This switch is indicated by audio cues that go from suspenseful to sinister, complementing the visuals perfectly to create a truly nightmarish experience.

    After touring the creepy facility for a while, blasting mutants that looked like extras from the Hellraiser movies, I encountered the fanged brute I'd earlier seen eat a guy and that's when things really got ugly. This creature, appropriately-named “The Gnaw”, was the first of the two alarming bosses I got to battle in the demo. I was locked in a small room with this all-teeth freak, chasing after it when it was on the ground and trying to avoid its spewing acid when it was on the ceiling. It climb repeatedly up to the ceiling, positioning itself just above my head then disgorged torrents of green muck that spawned those annoying little worm-like things from the first Dementium. After showering me with intestinal goo, it jumped back down just long enough to sink its teeth into me and then started the cycle all over again. Even against such a lethal opponent, I and my humble little knife triumphed.

    The second boss was even more challenging and disturbing than the first (why are female monsters always creepier?). This one was called the “Wendigo Witch”. Her approach was indicated by an onscreen directional indicator which drew my attention to her eyes, glowing red in the distance. If I didn't get my finger on the trigger in time, this gaunt, flying horror came barreling out of the dark and smacked me around. This was a highly-effective hit-and-run attack, but it wasn't her only one. Periodically, she also sent out an array of yellow beams (I'm not sure the art here was final. It looked temp.) that caused me great harm if I failed to step between them. Needless to say, this first round it ended up being Wendigo Witch—one; me—zero.

    Overall, Dementium II looks to be a great improvement on its predecessor. Not only are the controls easy and intuitve, the game has gotten rid of its terribly annoying perpetual respawn mechanic and now features an inventory that allows you to collect and carry health vials and ammo. Most importantly, it now has a liberal sprinkling of manual save points and an auto-save system that kicks in more or less every time you step through a door. With these improvements, things are looking good for the Dementium franchise as well as the future of mature titles on the DS. Dementium II is set for release, February 2010.
     
  10. .:Crimonite:.

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    great news people, for those of you who wish to buy the game, you can now pre-order from gamestop ----> HERE
     
  11. .:Crimonite:.

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    Hands-on: Dementium 2 (DS)
    by Ben Gilbert {Nov 20th 2009 at 5:30PM}

    Having not played Renegade Kid's first survival/horror-FPS on the Nintendo DS back in 2007, Dementium: The Ward, I had few expectations going into my recent hands-on with the game's sequel, the aptly titled Dementium 2. I knew that the first game enjoyed critical acclaim for more than adequately bringing survival/horror tropes to Nintendo's handheld, and ultimately scored pretty well with reviewers, but ever since Metroid Prime Hunters I've been wary of first-person mechanics on the DS.

    Thankfully, when first faced with manipulating Dementium 2's main character, it became quickly obvious that the game's slow pace helps to account for any discomfort issues that might arise from the control scheme. Over the course of 45 minutes, I put together puzzles, traveled between two dimensions multiple times, and even fought a boss who tried to throw up on me from the ceiling (what a jerk!). Though its content and storytelling seems to be a carefully crafted amalgam of games from the three or so genres it mashes up (fps, adventure, survival/horror) – a handheld Half-Life meets Silent Hill on Monkey Island, almost – the time I spent with a preview build of Dementium 2 earlier today felt like the beginning of what could be a very interesting game.

    As in the first game (at least, so I'm told), the story begins by waking up in a mysterious psychiatric hospital. Run down decor gives off the idea that the place has seen better days – an idea confirmed while being dragged back to my holding cell during the game's opening cinematic and seeing the rest of the dingy mental hospital/prison. Soon enough, though, D2 revisits the first game's dual reality, allowing for escape from the cell – and consequently also allowing the second dimension's disfigured creatures to inhabit the hospital's corridors.

    I spent the better part of the next half hour exploring the first level's various rooms, getting stumped by an obvious puzzle, and shanking everything that came into sight (a surprisingly large number of mouth-chested beasts, thankfully not suffering from the first game's respawning problems). Playing with noise-canceling headphones, I was privy to all sorts of unnerving noises early on, belonging to creatures who, maybe thankfully, were not revealed in the game's first level.

    I'd be remiss if I didn't mention that jamming on the left shoulder button (somewhat spongy on my DS Lite) felt a bit cumbersome when fighting the game's first boss. That said, D2's handler assured us that guns later in the game help to solve that problem.

    For those of you looking for mature DS titles, Renegade Kid seems to be bringing another competent, interesting genre mash-up to the Nintendo DS in Dementium 2. We'll know for sure when the game arrives at retail next February.
     
  12. .:Crimonite:.

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    Dementium II Preview: Hands Coming Out of Your Face!
    by Jonathan Zungre on November 30, 2009 at 3:37 pm

    Zungre: Chad, I think a hand is about to come out of my mouth!

    Chad: What the hell are you talking about Zungre?

    Zungre: No seriously, it feels like..blahhhahhlk *garble garble*

    Chad: Whoa! Zungre, can I get a picture of this and send it to the guys who make Dementium II?

    Zungre: …Mmmhmm.

    Dementium II reminds me of growing up with the most pants-peeingly scary game series ever, Silent Hill. Why? Because, like Silent Hill, Dementium II makes use of the unsettling mechanic of constantly thrusting the player between two different disturbing worlds, therefore never letting them establish a sense of familiarity with the environment. You never feel comfortable. You never feel safe.

    Dementium swaps you between two almost equally horrifying dimensions, an insane asylum, with its muttering, screaming inmates, and an industrial, gore-splattered torment dimension. And the game knows exactly when to switch it up on you for the best scares.

    The game also uses some slick scripted events. Right after I took down a disgusting “Chest Maw,” a ghoul with a humongous mouth slit vertically down its abdomen, I saw a poor soul strung up from the ceiling like a side of beef in a meat locker. As I considered if I had stumbled into the Todd McFarlane section of a dank comic book store, an enormous beast sped through a door, snatched the poor soul up in its shark-like mouth and disappeared. The whole thing took seconds.

    Naturally when I walked through that same area, I was on the lookout for the same huge monster. And that’s when the game ripped me out of the hell dimension back into asylum level, with a loud startling noise. I was playing with headphones and, yeah, I jumped.

    It’s ambitious enough to make an M rated game on the DS, but it’s even more impressive to try to make it a first person shooter. You move forward, backward and strafe left or right with the cross pad and moving the stylus on the touch screen controls which way you’re looking. Controlling your aim with the stylus is refreshing break from console controls, as it feels a lot more like the responsiveness and pin point precision of a keyboard and mouse configuration.

    Double tapping the crosspad makes you run and the shoulder button makes you fire or swing your shiv. It takes some getting used to, especially when you’re under the game’s duress, but could ultimately prove to be a really deep control scheme for the DS.

    I also got to play through (get my ass kicked by) two of Dementium II’s bosses. The huge beast who ate the dangling corpse returns in a boss fight and this time he not only wants to eat you but spit bile at you as well. Another boss battle features a room lit only by a centered spotlight and a Banshee that screams and flies at you from the room’s dark edges. It’s exhilarating not knowing where she’s going to attack from and the screaming naturally adds to the tension of the confrontation.

    Dementium 2 makes a bunch of improvements over the first Dementium game. First of all, it’s outdoor areas make it twice as big as the original, and an onscreen map keeps you from getting lost in those many blood soaked corridors. And, hallelujah, you can now hold a weapon and the flashlight at the same time. The monsters are scary enough let alone not being able to see and fight them at the same time.

    The game also features some cool puzzles, health restoring items and well placed save points, but the main attraction here is surviving the scares. We’ll see exactly where Dementium 2 makes itself remembered in the great history of survival horror games this February.

    Posts merged

    Dementium II – hands-on
    You're going to want a nightlight after this

    Words: Nathan Meunier, GamesRadar US

    You have to hand it to the guys at Renegade Kid - they’ve managed to elevate disturbing to an art form. Exhibit A: the box art for the developer’s upcoming horror-drenched follow up to its first-person survival horror experiment Dementium: The Ward. It features a close-up shot of some poor bastard screaming in terror, though his cries are clearly muffled by the human hand that’s ripping its way out of his own mouth and clawing at his eyes. Amazing. Judging from our recent hands-on time with Dementium II, good things are on the way. Particularly if you like you handheld gaming sessions served up with a slab of raw, bloody meat.

    The first Dementium game on DS drops you into the head of a psychotic mental patient brutalizing his way through gore-strewn hallways of an abandoned institution infested with crawling medical atrocities. You’ll play the same character in the sequel, only this time you wake up in a military-style prison after getting captured and having your head messed with. Throughout the game your perspective fades in-and-out between the already gritty real world and an even more horrifying alternate reality that closely resembles strung-together scenes from Hellraiser. These unnerving and jarring transitions come when you least expect them, and they’re one of several interesting setting tweaks thrown in to freshen up the experience.

    One second we were walking down a plain hallway and turning into a room, and the next second there was a blinding flash of light and a piercing drone. The previously empty room suddenly had a table in it containing a writhing mangled corpse with metal hooks and chains slowly removing its innards. In addition to this sporadic jolting between realities, the level designs themselves change up frequently and are a lot more dynamic than the levels in the first game. Even within the first 30 minutes of our play session the scenery shifted half a dozen times. At one point we opened a door and were practically blinded when we found ourselves standing outdoors staring at a bright wintry landscape from a fenced-in area. Dementium II is reportedly twice as big its predecessor, and you can eventually leave the confines of the prison and venture out into the outside realm.

    Renegade Kid has done a great job of listening to both positive feedback and criticism from the first Dementium and implemented a laundry list of changes to make the sequel a much smoother game. Enemies thankfully don’t re-spawn when you return to rooms you’ve already explored. Also, regular save points appear before important events, and there’s now an option to manually save from anywhere. The slightly overhauled interface is another big improvement. You can quickly drag-and-drop equipment directly between your inventory and your hands without having to pause first. And navigating is a lot less tedious now that there’s a constant map integrated into the touch screen.

    As an escapee, you have to work with what you can find. Early weapons include a shank, a revolver, and a sledgehammer that can break through boarded up doorways. You can expect a few automatic weapons and other more powerful munitions will become available, and believe us, you’ll need them. Only two monsters carry over from the original game, which means you’ll face a mostly new array of grisly creatures to dismember. The flashlight makes a return, and you can now dual-wield it with single-handed weapons. It’s nice being able to see what’s trying to kill you and fight back at the same time.

    Exploring the very early stretches of the near-finished game felt pleasantly familiar but infinitely better than the original. The game’s high creep-out factor is in full-swing here. The biggest “aha” moment came during the first major boss battle where we were stuck frantically jabbing a prison shank into a toothy boss creature with hooks for hands that pressure vomited flesh-eating, screeching maggots bathed in acidic bile from the ceiling down at us. Dementium II has already exceeded out expectations, and you can look for our full report when it releases in February.

    Dec 1, 2009
     
  13. .:Crimonite:.

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    DEMENTIUM II RELEASE DATE
    12-17-09

    DS owners can mark their calendars now for the hotly anticipated survival horror FPS.

    SouthPeak Games is pleased to give North American Nintendo DS owners a day to be scared of, that day - Tuesday, February 16, 2010. That morning's sunrise may very well be the last one fans see as they embrace the darkness of the survival horror FPS Dementium II, the follow-up to 2007's handheld horror masterpeice Dementium: The Ward. For our friends in Europe, you have two additional weeks to prepare before Dementium II hits your shore on March 5, 2010.

    Dementium II continues to push the horror experience by melding FPS action and puzzles with story and ambience that will have players on the edge of their seats. New wrinkles to gameplay, all new weapons, dual wielding items, improved interface and save system, and mind-boggling environments promise to engage gamers and spawn fear the likes of which some never thought possible.

    Pre-order your copy now, here.
     
  14. .:Crimonite:.

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    Dementium II Preview: A Metriod with Dread.
    Dec 18, 2009 11:40 AM

    They're mixing Metroid with Resident Evil again, and gamers who want to play an M-rated game like that on the DS just might have to give the makers of Dementium II some thanks.

    During subway rides and at home for the past couple of days, I've been stealing some time to play a preview build of development studio Renegade Kid's February 2010 game, Dementium II. I fared better than I did during my first hands-on with the game just before Halloween.

    Renegade Kid has created a first-person horror game that, for a cumulative two hours, kept my character perilously close to danger and death as I crept through an insane asylum and neighboring town. This is not a game to play if you want to feel comfy and settled, though as far as controls go, it actually is quite solid: The action is on the top screen, the stylus controls where you look, face buttons handle foot movement, and a shoulder button triggers melee weapons and gun attacks. The lower screen shows a map, which, in Super Metroid style is marked with blocked passageways that can be accessed with only the correct weapon — or, in more of a Resident Evil-style flourish, by solving a puzzle.

    The game does creepy well. You wake up in an insane asylum that at its most hospitable has guards running after you with electrified shock sticks. Sometimes this demented place becomes an alternate hellish version of itself, its colors turning sickly greens and grays and its inhabitants suddenly including demons and helpless screaming men whose bellies are being bored by giant drills. The sounds, as I noted in my first preview are full of screeches and scratches and other unsettling tones. This kind of environment mixed with ammo scarcity and lots of angry demon enemies makes playing the game an experience of feeling perpetually imperiled.

    For this preview I played into the game's third chapter, leaving the asylum after beating a monster boss (who wasn't as tough as he seemed when I fought him in October) and trudging out through a boiler room and into the snow. I found a village and some locked-door puzzles but mostly had to kill monsters, being sure to never use too many of the scarce revolver bullets and shotgun shells I found. My Metroid skills were put to good use, as I noted green markers where I'd found areas blocked by boarded-up doorways. Once I found a sledgehammer I was backtracking and knocking through those boards.

    There's a so-far simple story driving me through the game. My character is William Redmoor and he's being taunted through voice-over both by a guy who seems to be running the asylum and possibly by the former Mrs. Redmoor. At the wife's behest I was eventually trying to dig up our daughter's grave. Creepy stuff. The story didn't feel complex, but it suited the atmosphere, as did numerous graffiti marks on the asylum's walls and the too-placid homes in the snow village through which I trekked.

    There's little like this kind of game on the DS. There are few M-rated games, few horror titles and few Metroid descendants. Ultimately, though, this is a DS game, which means that someone who likes those things best not be bothered by the system's limitations. Renegade Kid's game looks good, but can't look much better than Nintendo-64-level 3D. For a horror game, I think that works, as the abstracted gory realism takes on almost a nightmarish edge. Less easy to tolerate is the limited artificial intelligence, which leaves enemies running at you in predictable patterns and results in combat that can feel more repetitious than what you're getting in 3D horror games on consoles.

    There's plenty here to like, with key questions only lingering about the game's length and variety, both of which will be answered when Dementium II is released for the Nintendo DS in North America on February 16 of next year.

    By Stephen Totilo
     
  15. astrangeone

    astrangeone GBAtemp Addict
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    Think I love this. I'd have to play through the original first, however. I never got into it - intended to play during halloween too.

    Hmmm...graphics look better and I love the boxart.
     
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    Written by Adam Riley (jesusraz)
    Posted on 30.10.2009 (not sure why the renegadekid website is so slow. this only arrived there on 06-01-10)

    Dementium: The Ward was the first Nintendo DS outing for US developer Renegade Kid and was lauded for its impressive graphics engine that seemingly pushed the portable system to its limits, certainly bettering anything else seen on the platform in the first-person genre at that point. By the time the game reached European shores, any major issues found in the US edition had been rectified, but gamers were still crying out for a more well-rounded horror adventure on the whole. Now the team has churned out a follow-up that is said to blow the original out of the water. Cubed3 recently had the chance to play an early version of the game to see just how well it is shaping up...

    William Redmoor, who also featured in the first title, wakes up in a mental hospital, groggily shakes his head and is informed by the nurse that he is to be kicked out due to lack of space in the facility. As he stumbles along he sees flashes of evil beings, torturous events and generally disturbing scenes. He then finds himself trapped in a prison cell with an odd room-mate, mumbling away to himself in a strange language. Upon finding a postcard left on his lower bunk, actually written by himself stating that he should get out of there as soon as possible, the scene fades and refocuses to William being in a warped version of the same cell. Now there is blood all over the place, a twitching skeletal figure strapped to the wall, and a busted cell door. This is where the player takes full control, moving the main character around with the D-Pad and looking around by moving the stylus across the touch-screen. A simple tap on the down arrow found in the lower-right part of the screen makes him crouch, whilst the arrow above it makes him jump over obstacles (double-tapping also results in a jump). The walking pace is incredibly slow to begin with, as in Square Enix's Nanashi no Game, but, also similar to that title, the shuffling speed can be upped to a gentle trot by double-tapping on the D-Pad. Switching between items has been made much easier; a tap and drag action is used to select the item icon at the bottom and slide the stylus across to the appropriate item in the inventory screen that appears. Attacking is achieved by tapping on either the left shoulder button or the right, depending on whether you're right or left-handed.

    The game is masterful in its purposely perplexing nature, swiftly drawing players into a great state of confusion, switching between standard prison settings filled with crazy prisoners and armed guards to the dark, dank, blood-filled sections that are littered with monsters and highly disturbing sound effects and voice-over work. The in-game music bolsters the mood perfectly as well, regularly jumping from eerie, haunting piano-style tunes to fast and frenetic beats when an enemy comes charging towards you. There's also plenty of gurgling noises and loud bangs and clangs thrown in to up the tension levels. There is, thankfully, more than just a gruesome setting - there is plenty of substance, with a pleasing back-story to Dementium II. Whilst knowledge of the first game is not a prerequisite, as you progress further various scrawled messages and hospital notes can be collected, providing more background information on William Redmoor and how he was transferred from Cowling State Hospital for the Criminally Insane where he had been charged with murdering his wife and suffering from a psychotic break. Those that have played the first outing will find the additional information about Redmoor intriguing, whilst newcomers will still be able to enjoy the ride.

    Visually this sequel is leaps and bounds ahead of Dementium: The Ward. Whilst the underlying engine appears to be the same, the range of character models and superior animation added this time round makes for a far more realistic experience, helping to suck the player into the twisted world. Sure, some of the textures may be the same in different areas, but far more effort has gone into creating a wide variety of monsters and human characters. In general, from the time put into the game so far, Dementium II is certainly proving to be more of the same, but better in almost every way. According to a Press Release that publisher SouthPeak Interactive sent with the early release the game is: twice the size of the original, has a totally overhauled save mechanic that removes the annoyances of the previous check point system (saves are done via swirling red screens found in convenient places), and features a flashlight that can be held at the same time as a weapon (only certain weapons - a sledgehammer requires two hands, for instance, whilst a pistol can be held at the same time as the torch), which certainly warrants a huge sigh of relief for those that found the first game so frustrating when having to quickly switch between the weapon and light all the time. To aid with progression, rather than having a map hidden on a separate screen, the player is presented with a real-time mini-map which highlights passages that have already been explored, as well as locked doors, so keeping an eye on where you have and haven't been is no longer a chore. Finally, special new weapons are available to help open up new areas, and the inventory system has been revamped so all First Aid packs and ammunition can be stored in it, while energy is saved for later rather than being used immediately upon collection or left on the ground when unneeded.

    As players delve deeper into the game, they find out that William has had brain surgery and something spilled out of his mind during the operation, resulting in the two worlds split throughout the adventure. Elements such as this are explained by nicely rendered cut-scenes that are impressively voiced and oozing with ambience. Even in the early stages of play, developer Renegade Kid has attempted to keep gamers on their toes. For instance, the first boss encounter is a large beast that runs around an enclosed arena, leaping up and crawling along the ceiling before dropping down and lunging at you before leaping back upwards and drooling foul liquid onto the ground, which then spawns small creatures that snap at you whilst you dash about trying to avoid all the dangerous elements. This type of intense scenario is a great feature, but highlights how the controls can be rather fiddly at times. Although perfectly suited to the more sedate moments, when trying to double-tap the D-Pad to run, plus repeatedly bashing the L-button to attack, more often than not the DS will start to slip from your grasp, only making matters worse in dire situations. However, clearly practice makes perfect and a steadier hand starts to come more naturally later in the game. Throw in more accurate weapons than the initial blunt knife, such as a pistol, shotgun and even flamethrower, and any initial control concerns become slightly alleviated. No doubt on the two higher difficulty levels on offer (Easy - Normal - Hard) the game will test the resolve of even the most hardened veteran. But on the whole, despite minor gripes about the controls, Dementium II is definitely looking like a highlight for the start of 2010.

    Dementium II is already shaping up to be a much improved experience compared to that of the original - even surpassing Renegade Kid's other recent DS title, Moon. Currently the team is hoping to get it released early in 2010 in the US, and with any luck Europe will not have to wait too long this time round for what looks to be the best horror DS title in the Western world (Square Enix - where is Nanashi no Game?). Keep a close eye on this one…
     
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