Building a gaming PC

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by Godamit, Jul 21, 2011.

Jul 21, 2011

Building a gaming PC by Godamit at 4:23 AM (2,029 Views / 0 Likes) 31 replies

  1. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Hey guys, I'm interested in building myself a new PC since my current PC can barely run the newest games.
    I'm sticking to a budget of $1,000 (which I hear is an optimal amount for a very good PC), however I am willing to go above that by a few $100, but only if absolutely necessary.
    The following is a list of all components I'm considering (and that are required for a complete system, so if there's something missing please notify me [​IMG]).

    Case: Lian Li Lancool PC-K62 $139
    CPU: Intel Core i5 2500K 3.3GHz $215
    Heatsink and fan: CoolerMaster Hyper 212+ CPU Cooler with Noctua NF-P12 120mm Fan $59
    RAM (memory): Corsair 8GB (2x4096MB) CL9 1600Mhz VENGEANCE $99
    Motherboard: ASUS Sabertooth P67 $239
    Graphics card: GTX 560 $269
    PSU: Corsair TX-650 ATX Power Supply Unit $113

    From old setup (current PC)
    Monitor: 23" Full HD
    Hard Drive: Have 2 (640GB + 2TB)
    Keyboard: Wouldn't mind a new one if you guys recommend something.
    Mouse: Current one is bad, so I'll probably buy a new one.
    CD/DVD-Drive: May just borrow from current PC.
    Sound Card: Might just borrow it from my current PC (taking the whole sound system and giving it to the new PC)
    Network Card: Would prefer to get a new one.

    Current total: $1,162 (incl. shipping)

    I have added some notes next to a few and empty fields simply mean I haven't decided on a specific model yet (I will edit this post as we go along so someone who's more knowledgeable than I can give me the thumbs up to go ahead and start collecting the parts after it's all dealt with).

    EDIT: Gonna have to skip on the HD6970. The max. I currently have funds for is $1200, so unfortunately this card is out of the question.
     


  2. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    As in the last post of this kind, here's a table to help you (along with advice on each part):
    Warning: Spoilers inside!
    This should give you a very good idea of what parts to get. That aside, you won't need a new network card (unless it's for WiFi) since motherboards come with Gigabit LAN as standard.

    My suggestion:
    CPU: Core i5-2500K or Core i7-2600K (depending on how much of the budget you want to put into the CPU)
    Motherboard: MSI P67A-GD53 (B3) for overclocking or ASUS Sabertooth P67 for gaming.
    Heatsink: Be Quiet! Dark Rock Advance. If you don't mind going more expensive, the Pro version has better cooling.
    Graphics: HD6970. Actually a HD5770 or a GTX 550 would be enough for you to play games on max, but you probably want to play all games on max for the next four years.
    PSU: Anything from a well known brand (Antec, Tagan, Enermax, Corsair, OCZ, etc) that's more than 600W.

    I won't suggest a case, since that's more down to your personal taste. The Antec series is good (Antec 100, Antec 902 or Antec 1200 depending on how big you want it), Lian Li do many good cases, and Silverstone have been getting some good reviews (even if they're on the expensive side). As long as it has good airflow, it won't matter much which you choose.
     
  3. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Hmm, maybe I'll go with the ASUS mobo, not really interested in overclocking. Thanks for the guide.
     
  4. HaniKazmi

    Member HaniKazmi GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    Nice to see someone who actually does their research for once [​IMG]
    Your current list looks fine, although I'd get a slightly more powerful psu if you afford it. 650W should be enough for your system, but its a good idea to get higher in case you want to overclock or upgrade in the future.Try getting a 750W or above. (Note: Quality if more important than power, and a good brand 650W like your corsair would be better than a shitty 750W)

    For your network car, g or n? Mouse is pretty much personal choice, so I'll leave that to you.
     
  5. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    For my network card, it's g. Thanks for the PSU notes, I'll take a look at the prices I can get for 750W. If I find it reasonable then I'll go that route.
     
  6. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Bumping this to let you know that I updated my first post with the final parts. Everything is ordered and should be here by the end of next week (starting tomorrow).

    Now, I have failed to mention this is my first time building a custom PC (I've only tinkered with a handful of components and replaced things, but never built from scratch) and I was curious what are the hardest parts about this process?
    Am I mostly just doing "lego for big boys" (as I read somewhere on this forum) or are there some things such as with the motherboard I may need assistance with?
     
  7. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    The most complicated part to fit in is the heatsink. Second is the motherboard (even though that just involves screwing it down, sometimes the heatsink and the case gets in the way of the top left screwhole), and third is the PSU (knowing where to put all the cables and keeping unused cables out of the way). When you get the parts, you'll have to work out for yourself which order you'll have to put it together.

    Start by looking at the heatsink instructions. If it can be easily fitted when the motherboard is in the case, then do it that way. If it's too fiddlely, then put it on whilst the motherboard is outside of the case to make it easier. Don't forget to put the CPU in first. Once the heatsink is in place and the motherboard is screwed down, put the PSU in and start thinking about where you'll thread all the cables. The rest is just slotting in the RAM, graphics card, HDDs and ODD, giving them all power, connecting SATA cables, and finally pushing in the front panel connectors (be careful, this involve pins that can easily bend, although the motherboard will come with an adaptor to make it easier for you).
    EDIT: I forgot to mention plugging in the connectors for the case fans. They'll either use Molex power or 3-pin motherboard connections. In the case of the 3-pin types, there'll be 3-pin fan headers scattered around the motherboard. It's just a matter of plugging them all in.

    After that, plug in the power, monitor, mouse, keyboard, and Ethernet cable(if you have one) and enjoy setting it up for the first time.
     
  8. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Thanks for the instructions, guess the fact I'm overly careful with new things will come in handy [​IMG]
     
  9. nico445

    Member nico445 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    you don't have to be super carefull. i've had a internship at a computer shop (google translate says internship so not sure if it's right)
    and my first fault there was not pushing the ram hard enough in it. and because of that i managed to fry the ram and a ram slot on the motherboard.
    when you plug in the cables from the case (power reset etc.) you should just open your motherboard manual in there you can see
    which cable needs to be plugged in where. the rest is pretty simple
     
  10. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    Internship, work placement, work experience... it's all the same thing - working without getting paid, in order to get experience.

    Regarding the RAM... all you do is make sure it's the right way up, then push it in at each end until the clip "snaps" in. I didn't mention it in my last post because I take it for granted and it's mentioned in the motherboard manual anyway.
     
  11. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Don't worry, I've installed RAM, graphics card, etc, before I've just never had to deal with putting in the motherboard/heatsink/PSU.

    EDIT: My only other concern is applying thermal paste to the heatsink. Have to squeeze 3 thin lines on each copper pipe on this heatsink so when I connect it to the motherboard it is spread due to being flattened.
    Overall, is applying the paste at all trivial or will it be easy enough?

    EDIT2: Also, considering the new mobo, I'll have to reformat my HDD/s. Now, currently I use my 640GB as OS and my 2TB for backups etc. Is a reformat necessary only for the OS HDD (where drivers, etc are installed) or will I have to reformat my backup (2TB) HDD as well? >.
     
  12. marcus134

    Member marcus134 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Actually, this can be problematic if you put too much paste ( especially if it's arctic silver) cause it will spill and shorts some pin on the mobo, potentially causing some damage. I would only recommend to place one drop on the center of the heat spreader (on the cpu), put the heatsink on it, and apply a gentle pressure while gently making a circular gesture to spread the paste. And, without removing the heatsink, use some paper towel to check if some paste spilled on the side of the cpu.
     
  13. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Hmm, thanks for that response, not sure what type of paste I'll be getting (since I'll be using the provided thermal paste).
     
  14. HaniKazmi

    Member HaniKazmi GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    the provided thermal mat which is preapplied is usually enough if you're not overclocking, thermal paste is not always needed.

    This is of course if you're using the default heatsink.
     
  15. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Oh, so I can skip the thermal paste entirely if I don't plan to OC?
    Hmm, nice to know [​IMG]
     
  16. Originality

    Member Originality Chibi-neko

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    ...And listed is a third party heatsink. One that probably does not have pre-applied paste (judging from the pictures at least).

    I personally use Zalman thermal paste - it comes with a brush to apply it in a similar fashion to nail varnish.
     
  17. luke_c

    Member luke_c Big Boss

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    No, if you're not overclocking then you don't really need an aftermarket heatsink, the stock heatsink which comes with the CPU with pre-applied thermal paste will be fine.
    EDIT: Whilst you don't need it, it will still lower temperatures.
     
  18. Godamit
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    Member Godamit GBAtemp Regular

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    Guess I actually should though, never know when I'll change my mind. Best to get it out of the way regardless, so I will apply it.
    Though judging from a few things I've seen from the provided paste, it SHOULD be fine (as in not spilling), guess I'll just wait till I actually get it.

    Though could anyone answer my question regarding reformatting?
    Here's the question so you don't have to go back:
    Considering the new mobo, I'll (from what I've heard) have to reformat my HDD/s. Now, currently I use my 640GB as OS and my 2TB for backups etc. Is a reformat necessary only for the OS HDD (where drivers, etc are installed) or will I have to reformat my backup (2TB) HDD as well? >.
     
  19. nugundam0079

    Member nugundam0079 GBAtemp Fan

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    I think I'll just buy a prebuilt gaming rig-work doesnt afford me the time to go looking for all this parts.
     
  20. HaniKazmi

    Member HaniKazmi GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    You just need to reformat the drive with the OS, the 2tb should be fine.

    nugundam0079: I'm sure people here would pick out parts for you if you listed your requirements, and building is very simple. It takes bout 2-3 hours if its your first time.
     

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