WireWorld DS 1.0 RC1

Discussion in 'GBAtemp & Scene News' started by Destructobot, May 2, 2008.

May 2, 2008

WireWorld DS 1.0 RC1 by Destructobot at 10:38 PM (1,646 Views / 0 Likes) 2 replies

  1. Destructobot
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    Member Destructobot Crave the Hammer

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    [​IMG] WireWorld DS 1.0 RC1
    DS Version of a Cellular Automaton
    [​IMG]

    WireWorld DS is a DS version of the cellular automaton under the same name. See the Wikipedia article for more information about WireWorld.

    So far WireWorld DS has:
    - basic WireWorld implemented
    - editor builtin
    - clear/clear electrons
    - settings, some more settings!
    - a title screen
    - scrolling.

    Full Changelog

    [​IMG] Download
     
  2. yuyuyup

    Member yuyuyup GBAtemp Psycho!

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    Wireworld From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Wireworld is a well-known cellular automaton first proposed by Brian Silverman in 1987, as part of his program Phantom Fish Tank. It subsequently became more widely known as a result of an article in the "Computer Recreations" column of Scientific American. Wireworld is particularly suited to simulating electronic logic elements, or "gates", and, despite the simplicity of the rules, Wireworld is Turing-complete.

    hmm

    Cellular automaton From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A cellular automaton (plural: cellular automata) is a discrete model studied in computability theory, mathematics, theoretical biology and microstructure modeling. It consists of a regular grid of cells, each in one of a finite number of states. The grid can be in any finite number of dimensions. Time is also discrete, and the state of a cell at time t is a function of the states of a finite number of cells (called its neighborhood) at time t − 1. These neighbors are a selection of cells relative to the specified cell, and do not change (though the cell itself may be in its neighborhood, it is not usually considered a neighbor). Every cell has the same rule for updating, based on the values in this neighbourhood. Each time the rules are applied to the whole grid a new generation is created.

    can someone simplify this for us know-nothings ?
     
  3. Destructobot
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    Member Destructobot Crave the Hammer

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    You draw wires, and place electrons on the wires. The electrons move, and interact with the shape of the wires. This lets you create simulated electrical circuits and components by creating various shapes with the wires.

    As for cellular automata, they have a grid that you put stuff on. The stuff interacts with the grid or the other stuff next to it, possibly doing something interesting. It's easier to understand by playing with one than from a description. The most famous cellular automaton is probably the Game of Life (there's a DS version of this, too).
     

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