Learning C# for future use.

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by MadClaw, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. MadClaw
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    MadClaw GBAtemp Fan

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    Hello, I am 14.
    I know where i want to work but i need to know how to code in C#,
    It's a computer repair shop, i can work there when i am 16.
    So i figure if i learn C# now,It'll be better chance that they'll hire me^^
    So i was wondering if any of you guy's know of any guides to help me I'd really appreciate your help.
    Please and Thank You, [​IMG]
     
  2. WB3000

    WB3000 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    1. Why would a computer repair shop need you to know a computer language?

    2. When I learned, I first began with the tutorial for VB.NET, learned VB.NET, and then moved to C#. I believe the same tutorial is written in C# as well. It has you add a few controls to a form, and then write a few lines of code to take a URL and load a webpage. I believe it was linked from the IDE.

    Here's some tutorials from MSDN which could help:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa...28VS.71%29.aspx
     
  3. MadClaw
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    MadClaw GBAtemp Fan

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    lol i dont know, its just required,

    ^^ Thanks a lot
     
  4. emupaul

    emupaul GBAtemp Fan

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    knowing c# prolly wont help.... maybe knowing you A+ material and some advanced networking skills will help...
    I guess knowing a little C# could help you design some in house apps for the company...but the again you are just learning...

    I suppose it depends on how serious the owner of the buisness takes you seriously. I once worked for a cellphone repair and wholesale accessory distributor in chicago and Every once in a while fixed their computers, showing your handy, confident and knowledgeable helps, they later asked me to setup a website for them...I not being strong in that area thought outside the box and used OS Commerce. Maybe you knowing c# would allow you to make them a nice webapp or site? who knows...
     
  5. Joe88

    Joe88 [λ]

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    if a PC repair shop requirement is to know C# to get employed then im pretty sure they have no idea wtf they are doing

    and considering C# isnt very popular right now, not widely used
     
  6. MicShadow

    MicShadow GBAtemp Fan

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    C# is a good starting point, as it will set you up for any C-style language
     
  7. UltraMagnus

    UltraMagnus hic sunt dracones

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    If they require C# its probably not going to be a brilliant place to work...

    my usual suggestion for anyone wanting to learn any C based language is to learn normal C first, and then progress how you want to from there.
     
  8. Raki

    Raki GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    I agree to this. In a normal company a software developer won't do the network stuff or maintain PCs...that's stuff for the IT guys...dunno how they are called in english (in german they are called "Systemintegratoren")
     
  9. emupaul

    emupaul GBAtemp Fan

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    I posted in this thread already but i see it gets a new reply at least once every other day. So I wanted to say just learn c/c++ and be done with it, move on from there after those two languages are mastered learning something new will be easy, python, c#, java, lisp, haskell will all come natural afterward.

    All the other languages are too funky and and require you to know concepts learned from c/c++ and can confuse you later in programming career if you go to another language first before learning the fundamentals.

    Obviously learning c# for the shop would not be wise, knowing hands on hardware repair, solidering, replacing broken power on a laptop and crap like that would be more usefull than knowing a programming language in that settings.

    A better ideas would maybe to jump into PHP/Perl/CMS managened sites,ASP, if you wanted to design a future site for what ever reason. However I still recommended getting a good grasp on c/c++ because then you could write a good back-end server for your site to connect too and do extra stuff not available for you to do when using a pure web language. libcurl and libssl are libs written for webbased information to be stored in c/c++ data structures and may be useful when learning c/c++ and a web programming language co-currently.