Cleaning GBC and GBA shell/buttons.

Discussion in 'GBA - Hardware, Devices and Utilities' started by Pokepicker, May 12, 2017.

May 12, 2017
  1. Pokepicker
    OP

    Member Pokepicker GBAtemp Regular

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    Hi

    I just bought a GBA and would like to clean it. The buttons are kinda gross looking, and the bumpers are stained.
    Is there any recommended way to clean the buttons and shells of GBC/GBA? I thought maybe I could drop them in a glass of isopropanol and let them sit a little while before wiping them clean.

    Is isopropanol not recommended? Should I just use water instead? I understand isopropanol would be usable to clean PCB and stuff like the pins on GB cartridges. But I'm not sure how the plastics would react. I wouldn't want to strip them of colors or anything. Also I feel the bumper/shoulder buttons on the GBA are made from some other plastic then the d-pad and A/B buttons.

    Are there any recommended methods to clean the shells themselves? I could always drop it in a bath, but I would as far as possible, like to do this without further damaging the stickers on the back. So I'm guessing I would have to to some manual labor on the case.

    In short: What products do I need to clean my shells and buttons? How would I proceed to actually do the cleaning?
     
  2. Peeteris

    Newcomer Peeteris Member

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    Best way to clean plastic is using very warm water and soap.
    Let plastic sit in that water for an hour and then take a spare soft toothbrush to clean dirt off. Then wash plastic under warm water and dry them off.
     
    slaphappygamer likes this.
  3. doubledenim

    Newcomer doubledenim Member

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    Is there a good way to clean the metal area under the buttons? They have become dirty so you have to push really hard for it to react. Is it safe tog wipe with water or alcohol or can it be damaged then?
     
  4. Pokepicker
    OP

    Member Pokepicker GBAtemp Regular

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    Are you sure its not just the rubber pads that are worn down or ripped?
    As far as I know these pads are conductive. I swapped mine on a sluggish Gameboy Color and it was back in shape.

    If the PCB is dirty, I would probly use isopropanol(?) to clean it. I wouldn't even contemplate touching any of the metal/electronic parts.
     
  5. doubledenim

    Newcomer doubledenim Member

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    I used LOCA to attach a frontlight kit and it got a bit messy, so i think that is it. Its a bit sticky at some places

    Edit:
    Maybe its possible to just wipe them a bit, i havent tried yet. Will let you know the result!
     
    Last edited by doubledenim, May 19, 2017
  6. Peeteris

    Newcomer Peeteris Member

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    I have washed my PBC's in hot water and detergents numerous times, so you should be alright with using rubbing isopropanol on PBC. People are so scared with using water on PBC's, though it's just electricity that damages everything if used in this combination.
     
  7. doubledenim

    Newcomer doubledenim Member

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    I dipped a cuetip in alcohol and wiped them, it works fine now!
     
  8. Cuelhu

    Member Cuelhu GBATemp's Pepelatz Driver

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    The problem with water is that the contacts may oxidize.
     
  9. Peeteris

    Newcomer Peeteris Member

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    if there's electricity and you don't dry neatly.
     
  10. slaphappygamer

    Member slaphappygamer GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Use a dry toothbrush to clean the corrosion. Maybe a little WD-40 too.
     

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