Hardware Circle pad lock down lever thingy.......

jaisunny

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I have this speciality where I open up my sons 3DS to repair it, which I do with flying colours, but I also end up causing another problem.

This has happend 3 times now. These things are just a nightmare to work on.

Right, my circle pad was not working after I recently replaced the top screen. After ENDLESS HOURS of fiddling with the connections, I finally got it working. However, i had to open up the 3ds again as my son broke the circle pad. After fiddling for hours yet again to get it working again, eventually the plastic ribbon lock down lever has now demolished into pieces and totally unusable.

I have contacted replace base and they say I need a whole new 3DS board and that they don't supply this part. I find it a complete joke that a tiny plastic moving part is not possible to purchase.

So, does anyone know where i can get one?.

BTW i have tried for hours to wedge plastic, double sided foam and all sorts above the connector to secure the ribbon in with no joy. I need that lock down level thing.
 
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What you just described is something called the FFC connector with a flip lock. Nintendo isn't actually able to fix this because it's a micro-repairs (SMD components - capacitors, resistors). They only do macro-repairs (ie. single whole piece parts - motherboard, buttons, LCDs) because of economics.

You can try to find a comparable, similar connector and swap out the flip lock if the soldered base piece is still good. Refer to this thread of another user with a problem somewhat related to yours that I was helping to answer: [Question/Help]N3DS - component replacement

* for research on determining your broken FFC connector dimensions/specifications and where you might be able to buy a replacement in one of the listed big online electronic stores.

Edit: It's not my place to judge but perhaps your son is better off with a 1st gen 2DS? Those things may seem cheapy but are built solid especially with the type of handling from young children.
 
Last edited by TurdPooCharger,

jaisunny

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What you just described is something called the FFC connector with a flip lock. Nintendo isn't actually able to fix this because it's a micro-repairs (SMD components - capacitors, resistors). They only do macro-repairs (ie. single whole piece parts - motherboard, buttons, LCDs) because of economics.

You can try to find a comparable, similar connector and swap out the flip lock if the soldered base piece is still good. Refer to this thread of another user with a problem somewhat related to yours that I was helping to answer: [Question/Help]N3DS - component replacement

* for research on determining your broken FFC connector dimensions/specifications and where you might be able to buy a replacement in one of the listed big online electronic stores.

Edit: It's not my place to judge but perhaps your son is better off with a 1st gen 2DS? Those things may seem cheapy but are built solid especially with the type of handling from young children.


Thank for the info, appreciate it.

Well, i assume my son didn't do anything to break the circle pad. What could he of done?. I think its a common problem on these. He also wants the larger screen, luckily my youngest has no idea what is the best one so we've got him the 2DS, which has not developed any issues at all.
 

LameNobody

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Thank for the info, appreciate it.

Well, i assume my son didn't do anything to break the circle pad. What could he of done?. I think its a common problem on these. He also wants the larger screen, luckily my youngest has no idea what is the best one so we've got him the 2DS, which has not developed any issues at all.
So, somewhat of a hack suggestion...

Hot glue. (I've done this on more than one console, they're both still fine.)
You're not repairing the connector with it, you're using it to secure the cable connection.

Place the FFC in the cable slot and align it where it needs to be.
Take a smallish drop of hot glue and put it on top of the aligned cable.
Quickly, lick your finger and press down on the hot glue.

If it doesn't work the first time, use a q-tip and rubbing alcohol to remove the glue and try again.

This works because, the pressure of you pushing the hot glue makes the connection between the FFC and it's contacts..
Licking your finger makes the glue cool quicker, as well as protects you from burns..
 

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