Almost Brick

Discussion in 'Wii - Hacking' started by Buka, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. Buka
    OP

    Buka Newbie

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    Aug 9, 2013
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    A while ago, my Wii started having problems (Disk errors, crashing to a black screen), and I let it go for a bit, until recently, and it stopped accepting ANY disk.

    Now, I, called nintendo about this, since the disk feed was very slow on top of it.
    I removed the HB channel via the uninstaller, and shipped it into them.

    They sent it back, saying that owing to my modifications, they wouldn't fix it.

    Any advice on bringing it back to full working order?
     
  2. Aractus

    Aractus GBAtemp Regular

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    Aug 4, 2013
    Canberra
    Is that legal? It's not legal under Australian consumer law (unless of course your mods created the problem), and if Nintendo did that to me I would simply call them and explain that I have a statutory warranty (now called a consumer guarantee) under the Competition and Consumer Act 2010, that I expected the product to last longer than it has, and that if you decline to repair it I will have to lodge a claim against you. Nintendo would then be forced to offer me: repair (they can charge me a cost for this), replacement (they can also charge for this) or a refund in the amount of the depreciated value of the item. And it's their option as to which to offer me. They could only refuse this if I had broken it myself. So if they offered to repair it at a cost to me of say $60 (which is reasonable), I might find it better value to buy a 2nd hand Wii for $50. And they'd be well aware that refusal to repair would mean I'd go posting on whirlpool.net.au bringing their company negative feedback. I'd suggest you find out 1. if you have some kind of statutory warranty in the USA, and 2. if you do, what your rights are under it. If you have rights, then you can demand the product is fixed (like we can in Australia), and if you don't, well, then you can either buy a cheap 2nd-hand unit or replacement drive, or just don't use the disc drive and load from USB.

    Anyway, as for how to fix your issue, try this. Run syscheck. Back-up NAND with bootmii. Open sysCheck.csv on your PC. Post the contents here so we can see!
     
  3. Buka
    OP

    Buka Newbie

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    Aug 9, 2013
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    its out of warranty and I live in america.

    And I dont have the HB channel on my wii anymore, so I'm gonna have to reinstall to get that stuff. (forgot password. sorry for delayed responce)
     
  4. AwesomeMarioFan

    AwesomeMarioFan RiiConnect24 Dev

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    Jun 21, 2013
    United States
    They can detect small things on the NAND which are part of Homebrew Applications.
    To clear all traces:
    - NANDClean: https://sites.google.com/site/completesg/how-to-use/nandclean
    - Obviously, uninstall any cIOS, mIOS, etc.
    - An alternate method would be to reinstall all of the IOSs for the system. (This could be dangerous!)
     
  5. Aractus

    Aractus GBAtemp Regular

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    Aug 4, 2013
    Canberra
    Well in Australia we have what used to be called statutory warranties, and is now called "consumer guarantees", and it's a statutory right that a consumer can't waive, and that can't be negated by other warranties. In essence it means that retailers and/or distributors/manufacturers have a responsibility to repair/replace/refund for the "expected life" of the product. If you buy an "extended warranty" in Australia, you're essentially an idiot because it gives you very little extra on top of your automatic legal rights to expect the product will be repaired, replaced or the depreciated value refunded for the life of the product. Believe me if Nintendo did it to their Australian clients, there would be multiple threads on the whirlpool forums about it. Apple have a page here that explains it (really poorly IMHO) for their customers. Nintendo explain it even more poorly on their website:


    "In Australia, our goods come with guarantees that cannot be excluded under the Australian Consumer Law. You are entitled to a replacement or refund for a major failure and for compensation for any other reasonably foreseeable loss or damage. You are also entitled to have the goods repaired or replaced if the goods fail to be of acceptable quality and the failure does not amount to a major failure."


    Notice that they can't even say, legally, that opening the wii and installing a mod chip voids your consumer guarantee - because it doesn't. It doesn't stop them, however, from making that claim on this page here, and the claims that they make are both factually wrong and they would loose in court just like Sony did in 2005, but potentially libelous as well. As such they haven't even tried to bring suit against mod-chip distributors in Australia. Nintendo did win a case against the sales of the D4 flash cart, but that would have been for different reasons (tradmark/patent infringement, etc).

    Now to get back to your situation, in the USA. As I said, check your local laws. I see on Nintendo of America's page here it says this:

    SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS OR EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.

    And this:

    This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state. Nintendo's address is as set forth on the back cover of this booklet.

    They're not going to tell you what you're rights are, going by the information on the Australian site which makes it seem as if installing a modchip voids your rights under the consumer guarantees, etc. Check your rights, I already know what my rights are and I know that if Nintendo tried to stiff me like they did to you that I would politely call them and explain that the homebrew software is none of their concern and doesn't alter the fact that they have an obligation under the Australian Consumer Law to sell a product of merchantable quality that is covered by a an automatic non-waivable consumer guarantee. I would further inform them that any further inaction on their behalf would result in me posting the story for other consumers on the Whirlpool.net forums, giving other peers the opportunity to discuss whether you have acted appropriately under the Australian Consumer Law.
     
  6. Buka
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    Buka Newbie

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    Aug 9, 2013
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    I checked the consumer law for NJ, doesn't sound like it covers this instance.

    And to use NANDCLEAN, I'll have to reinstall the HB channel.