Windows 10 PC has different third octet IPaddress to all the others

Discussion in 'Computer Software and Operating Systems' started by 877, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. 877
    OP

    877 GBAtemp Regular

    Member
    3
    Mar 8, 2017
    United Kingdom
    So my sons PC has been having trouble connecting to our home network.

    I ran ipconfig and found:

    192.168.55.1 his IP address
    192.168.1.xxx all others on the network.

    So his third octet is different to all the others on the network. We tried ipconf/release then ipconfig/renew and it stays on the same 55 third octet.

    I fixed it for now by going into router (Asus AC68U) and changing subnet to 255.255.0.0 (as per what I googled as a fix), it seems to have moved the IP range to 192.0.x.x to 192.255.255.0
    So it works but seems wrong to have such a massive IP address range.


    How can I set his IP back to 192.168.1.x ?
    Or is it not a problem

    Thanks guys
     
  2. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

    Member
    8
    Apr 21, 2008
    London, UK
    In the properties of the network adapter of that PC, is the IP set to automatic or is it manually entered in?

    If it’s manual, then you can either set it to automatic or change the IP to one in the normal range (e.g 192.168.1.50 or 1.100).

    If it’s automatic, then you should look into the DHCP settings of your network (usually built into the router). Or alternatively, set the IP manually as above.
     
    877 likes this.
  3. 877
    OP

    877 GBAtemp Regular

    Member
    3
    Mar 8, 2017
    United Kingdom
    It is set to automatic, but I could set it to a manual ip like you suggested, never thought of that. I could also assign it a static ip in router I guess

    Not sure why this would be required though
     
  4. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

    Member
    8
    Apr 21, 2008
    London, UK
    If your DHCP is giving out IPs with such a large range, then you should be able to narrow down the range. I usually set a range of 192.168.1.50 to 1.200, which gives me 100 slots for static IPs (good for devices that don’t change, like extra routers, APs, TVs, NAS, servers, etc).

    For any other device like phones, laptops, desktops, etc, I let DHCP assign anything within that range because it doesn’t really matter which IP they have.

    Just be careful if you have multiple routers/APs on your network. You should only have one DHCP on the network, or you may end up with devices getting given the same IP, causing a clash.
     
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