Review cover BittBoy RK2020 (Hardware)
Official GBAtemp Review

Product Information:

The new “generation” of retro handhelds is here and the RK2020 from BittBoy is among them. Based on the RockChip RK3326 processor, it offers the potential to emulate N64, Dreamcast and even PSP games. Is it worth looking into?

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While Xbox and PlayStation are battling it out for being the best next-gen gaming console, another so-called generation of consoles is also unfolding but in the retro handheld scene. These new devices run on open-source firmware to offer emulation of retro consoles like the NES, WonderSwan and PlayStation. While a niche scene, it’s an active one with an enthusiastic community behind it. Part of this ecosystem are devices that I previously reviewed like the New PocketGo V2 and the RG350P, with the latter leaving a strong impression, especially on the hardware front. But on the software side, it’s always finicky with these handhelds and they don't offer the best UX out there. Additionally, these handhelds that I mentioned would offer decent emulation only up to the original PlayStation but not for the N64 and beyond.

However, several recent models on the retro handheld market are adopting the RK3326 processor, which is powerful enough to even offer PSP and Nintendo DS emulation, in addition to older systems. Generally speaking, the ODROID-GO Advance (OGA) set the standard for RK3326-based handhelds, with several dedicated firmwares developed for the system and strong community support. Other RK3326-based handhelds from other companies are labelled as OGA-clones due to the unmistakable design inspiration and even adopting the same OS.

The device under review today, the RK2020 from BittBoy, is one such OGA-clone. BittBy isn't foreign to copying other consoles and the company wasn't shy in doing so with its RK3326 console, which adopts the OGA's form factor and button layout, only with rounded edges. But then again, we're talking about the grey zone of emulation; so who's to be blamed is up in the air. Once noticeable difference between the OGA and the RK2020 is that the OGA comes disassembled for the user to mount, but the RK2020 comes as a ready-made unit, ready to play with the following specs, at a competitive price:

  • OS: RetroArch
  • CPU : RockChip RK3326 (Quad-Core ARM Cortex-A35 1.3GHz)
  • GPU : Mali-G31 Dvalin
  • Memory: 1GB (DDR3L 786Mhz, 32 Bits bus width)
  • Storage: SPI Flash(16Mbytes Boot), External Micro SD Card slot with Firmware installed
  • Display: 3.5inch 320×480 IPS screen
  • Audio: Earphone Jack
  • Battery: Li-Polymer 2600mAh
  • Input Buttons: D-pad, A, B, X, Y, shoulder buttons: L1/L2, R1/R2, Analog joystick, Select, Start, Power-on
  • Ports: USB type C for charging, USB type A for WiFi Dongle/ External Controller, external Micro SD slot

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At the time of writing the RK2020 is priced at $70 (or lower, depending on where you look) and while the price might be attractive, its cheap cost reflects on the console.

The unit I received is the Crystal Black model, and while it can entertain you with retro games, it can also entertain a baby by doubling as a rattle. Indeed the device’s buttons, especially the L2 and R2 buttons, fit rather loosely in the casing, leading to a noticeable rattling sound whenever you move the device.

The build quality feels plastic-y but ok for the price. The buttons also have the same finish and don’t offer the RG350P’s satisfying soft and gentle button-press feedback. However, I did like that in the RK2020, the face buttons are relatively large, making for more comfortable and precise presses. Shoulder buttons on the other hand are still the same as with the previous generation devices, requiring some reach to press, given the size of the device itself.

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But the cheaper build quality and assembly leads to noticeable backlight bleed on the sides of the screen. This is especially noticeable if you’re gaming in the dark or poorly-lit room, and you can imagine how distracting this can get. But importantly, it's a sign of an unpolished product.

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A major issue in this device is that it takes forever to charge. After draining it and plugging it for 2 hours, it barely reached 50%. Additionally, the device switches on whenever plugged in, with the screen staying on the homescreen; there’s no way to let it charge and be powered off at the same time.

However, even if the RK2020 got released a few months ago, I learnt that BittBoy issued a revised model shortly after with less rattle, faster charging, the ability to be charged while off and fixed the issue of overheating. This move raises questions regarding whether BittBoy is customer focused or just wanted to release an RK3326 device at a competitive price as a cash grab. It seems like the company is using its customers as QA testers rather than having dedicated QA testers who will help make a polished product. This was a major disappointment, especially those who adopted the first version of the device; but the disappointment did not end there.

Another noticeable drawback is the blatant lack of a volume rocker. If the GameBoy - which BittBoy has clearly inspired its devices from - itself had a volume rocker back in 1989, then the RK2020 has no excuses not to include one in its hardware. I could overlook the poor build quality but the omission of such a crucial feature of any gaming handheld cannot be overlooked. In order to adjust the volume on the RK2020, you have to rely on a combination of hotkeys (Select+L2 and up/down on D-pad). And this lack was not addressed in the "revised" model.

Furthermore, the console only features one speaker on the underside, right side (also not addressed in the "revised" model). It really offsets the audio experience but thankfully, there's a headphone jack to listen through headphones. It doesn't seem like BittBoy learnt from its previous systems to improve on its latest console but rather focused, once again, to copy on an existing device rather than offer something more compelling and original.

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The device in general has an over-reliance on hotkeys. This is due to the fact that even if the RK2020 is an OGA clone from hardware to software, the RK2020 lacks the 6 buttons that the OGA has below the screen. And since the RK2020 is piggybacking on the OGA’s firmware, it comes with compatibility issues that need you to rely on key combos whether it’s to access an emulator’s menu in-game, adjust the brightness or control the volume. There’s no straightforward way to perform these simple, yet crucial functions, despite the abundance of physical buttons on the device. 

Still on the issue of simplicity, there’s no simple way to load in your own ROMs on the RK2020. Unlike the previous “generation” of retro handhelds which came with 2 microSD cards, one for the OS and another for ROMs, the RK2020 comes with only one microSD which holds both the Linux-based OS and ROMs. 

If you don’t own a Linux-based computer, you will need to go through more hoops in order to load in your favorite retro games. To access the partitioned system files to copy my ROMs, I had to download an additional tool, the Paragon Linux File For Windows software which ended up corrupting my microSD card, rendering the firmware unstable and prone to crashes. A safer way is to transfer files over WiFi but you’ll need to purchase a separate dongle for that and plug it in the USB port on top of the device. Here again BittBoy blatantly copied on the OGA rather than improve on its own hardware and include a WiFi module to facilitate ROM transfer for its console's adopters. But alas, this is not the case, and the company does not even provide a proper guide regarding how to transfer your ROMs. It's all up to you to figure out.

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When it comes to the actual emulation, the RK2020 should offer similar performance to the OGA given that it packs similar specs. The RK3326 chip fares pretty well with older systems and the 320×480, 3.5inch IPS screen of the RK2020 offers vibrant colors for on-the-go gaming. It performs best with older consoles like the GBA, SNES (even games requiring the Super FX chip) or even the original PlayStation, whose games run at full-speed or nearly full-speed. Dreamcast and N64 emulation are also quite good, with some games like Shenmue and Ocarina of Time facing choppy audio and occasional drops in frame rate, but playable for the most part. Golden Eye on N64 had serious graphical issues, on top of the audio ones, where environmental elements would glitch in and out. As for the PSP, it’s mostly a hit-or-miss affair. Less demanding games play fine while others like Metal Gear Solid Peace Walker would be rather unstable, running anywhere between 10-20 fps. In general, less graphically demanding games from newer systems play better on the RK3326 processor.

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That’s talking about the built-in firmware (EmuELEC) and settings. The thing with these open source devices is that you can tweak the settings of the emulators and flash new firmwares that could offer better performance but it's extra work and the console isn't the best it can be out-of-the-box. For example, DS emulation works best on the Retro Arena FW rather than on EmuELEC FW while Batocera might offer better emulation performance overall. If you fiddle around, you might get decent gameplay but the RK2020 is not an out-of-the-box solution and not very user-friendly.

Even if the performance should be on par with the OGA, the RK2020 needs an OS of its own that would make for a much better user experience. But given BittBoy’s tendency to piggyback on others’ work, a dedicated RK2020 software might not happen any time soon, if ever.

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With its hardware issues, finicky controls and poor UX, the RK2020 makes a mediocre case for itself. You could consider it if you want a cheaper, pre-built alternative to the OGA and don't mind fiddling around with flashing firmware and tweaking settings to find the optimal gameplay settings for you. But if you aren’t too much in need of emulation for more recent consoles like the PSP, you might as well consider BittBoy’s own New PocketGo V2 which is easier to use and offers decent emulation performance of older systems. If you still want to play PSP games, then you might as well go for an actual PSP or PSP Go. They might fetch for a higher price but the performance will be worth it.

While the RK2020 might improve with time thanks to FW updates, as it is of writing, it doesn’t offer a compelling experience enough to mandate a purchase. Hopefully improvements on the software side in the near future will overcome the hardware design flaws but let's see if that actually happens before investing in one.

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Coupon Code

If you still want an RK2020 of your own, you can use the coupon code "EXME" on RetroMimi

Verdict

What We Liked ...
  • Affordable
  • Multi-system emulator
  • Portable and pocketable
What We Didn't Like ...
  • Over-reliance on hotkeys
  • No volume rocker
  • Only one speaker
  • Performance issues
  • Poorly designed hardware
4.5
out of 10

Overall

Despite offering some advantages over the device it inspired itself from, the RK2020’s poorly designed hardware, performance issues and a general poor UX don’t offer compelling reasons to buy this handheld as it is.
Oof. This thing certainly ain't no PiBoy DMG from Experimental Pi...something I wish I could have more to say about, but I haven't got mine yet. It's the only one of these devices that has six face buttons on front perfect for Sega, Fighting, and arcade games in general and has the performance horsepower necessary to seemingly run even the more demanding DC games at a reasonable speed.

When it comes to PSP, nothing beats a PSP Go tbh if you're looking for a more portable solution...other than the device not having any microSD card adapter that I could find on Amazon.
 
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Oof. This thing certainly ain't no PiBoy DMG from Experimental Pi...something I wish I could have more to say about, but I haven't got mine yet. It's the only one of these devices that has six face buttons on front perfect for Sega, Fighting, and arcade games in general and has the performance horsepower necessary to seemingly run even the more demanding DC games at a reasonable speed.

When it comes to PSP, nothing beats a PSP Go tbh if you're looking for a more portable solution...other than the device not having any microSD card adapter that I could find on Amazon.
I'm not sold on the RK3326-based devices yet. They perform better than the older emulator handhelds but don't perform as well on the systems they claim to emulate. The RG350P on the other hand emulates up to the PS1 and plays everything you throw at it. Maybe with time and more development in the scene those RK3326 handhelds will shine but might as well wait for the next "generation" of those devices.
 
I'm not sold on the RK3326-based devices yet. They perform better than the older emulator handhelds but don't perform as well on the systems they claim to emulate. The RG350P on the other hand emulates up to the PS1 and plays everything you throw at it. Maybe with time and more development in the scene those RK3326 handhelds will shine but might as well wait for the next "generation" of those devices.

The PiBoy DMG is essentially a RPi4 inside an OG Game Boy with six face buttons on front and one set of shoulder buttons on the back. ETA Prime reviewed it two months ago, I believe.

Link to the product in question, you could order the full kit pre-assembled or the full kit where it isn't assembled:
https://www.experimentalpi.com/PiBoy-DMG--Full-Kit_p_18.html
 
The PiBoy DMG is essentially a RPi4 inside an OG Game Boy with six face buttons on front and one set of shoulder buttons on the back. ETA Prime reviewed it two months ago, I believe.

Link to the product in question, you could order the full kit pre-assembled or the full kit where it isn't assembled:
https://www.experimentalpi.com/PiBoy-DMG--Full-Kit_p_18.html
I just took a look and while it seems powerful, the design isn't really that appealing to me personally. but yeah, it can be a better alternative to the other handhelds.
 
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Two people commenting on this review, two people being entirely false on every interpretation they draw. :)

The successor to the RG350P, the RG351P is actually using an RK3326.

The only deliberation process here concerns three parts. Price/availability to the vendor (which means, its 'Rockchip' and not Snapdragon ;) ), power consumption ceiling, which means currently it is 'some dreamcast games - close to full speed' and heat dissipation, which correlates with power consumption. :)

Thats what impacts your decision on which arm chip you pick.

To mention PiBoy in here is to completely fall pray to ETA Primes marketing partners advertising budget.

RaspPi is horrible on all those aspects, which is why most vendors selling people that dont know better on RaspPi handhelds reverted to use RaspPi lite models shrunk in size and performance, that barely hit Rasp3 performance yet.

On top of that, you are expected to run a Linux build, with an emulation station frontend on those Pis - thats exactly the same in UI, and UX and pretty much every other aspect to whats critizised in the 'test' so heavily. :)

So with the Pi it was great (down to it storing games on linux ext4 partitions, due to faster read speeds), but with the Odroid device (better performance/price ratio), its so horrible.. ;)

Light bleed on the display can be fixed by buying 30cents worth of black stickers from ali express, and opening the device once. :) Or buying the aluminium version.

'Linux is so hard' issue can be fixed, by using TheRA, which is a build that uses a ntfs partition for main storage.

Reviewer went on first impressions, and audience has no idea, how to interpret any of what it is seeing, but is referencing infuencer marketing.

Great. ;)


No volume rocker is not an issue - as volume in all games by default can be controlled with select+up and down, once they are running on their retroarch cores. And that is the ONLY button combination thats needed or used.

Default brightness can be set in config files, which should better be set to 15-20%, which is a thing you should do, since the Emulation Station brightness adjustment (menu based, not button combo based) doesnt stick.

I maintain, that the reviewer didnt spend a hot hour with this thing, before posting their review. :)

I have two of them I like them very much. My main issue is, that the older versions (v1) screens seemed better, but v2 solved battery charging issues, so is the one to go with. Also something no one out there mentions.. ;)
 
@notimp Where DC is concerned, I don't really care to suffer through Shenmue again, and the few games I can imagine it potentially having problems with (read: Virtua Fighter 3 and Dead or Alive 2) aren't exactly on my list of "games that I wish more of these devices could play" list like CVS2, MVC2, and any of the Guilty Gears that aren't the first one, Isuka, or the port of X to the GBA. Also, there's the Switch which can run just about everything DC just fine on HorizonArch except for MVC2 and CVS1.

As for everything else though...why not do your own review and share your opinion on the item? ;)
 
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Shenmue isnt full speed, so it wouldnt be much fun. (Past the novelty factor of it being played on a GBA micro size handheld.. :) ) But Soul Calibur (Pal) is (50-60 fps), which I played (NTSC set as a region with some framedrops in one stage, ...) almost every day for the past two months or so... ;)

So I enjoyed it very much. :)

But where the review is right is, that to get the most out of this device, you need to tinker with it, and I have to confess, I was bothered by the light bleed issue suficiently myself, that I went in there with black stickers and fixed it. :)


edit: I also play DC games on the device in 480p, default resolution in 320p which is below original render resolution, which looks horrible (even if it is the 'native' screen resolution (it also isnt but the bezel masks a 4:3 screen down to 3:2 (320p) at which point it is.. ;) ).
 
Two people commenting on this review, two people being entirely false on every interpretation they draw. :)

The successor to the RG350P, the RG351P is actually using an RK3326.

This is known, I even made an exclusive article about the RG351P, but nowhere in this review was RG351P mentioned. Not sure what your point is.

RaspPi is horrible on all those aspects, which is why most vendors selling people that dont know better on RaspPi handhelds reverted to use RaspPi lite models shrunk in size and performance, that barely hit Rasp3 performance yet.

On top of that, you are expected to run a Linux build, with an emulation station frontend on those Pis - that exactly the same in UI, and UX and pretty much every other aspect to whats criticised in the 'test' so heavily. :)

So with the Pi it was great (down to it storing games on linux ext 4 partitions, due to faster read speeds), but with the Odroid device (better performance/price ratio), its so horrible.. ;)

I haven't tested those Pi handhelds myself but if the UI/UX is equally bad but still offers better performance than RK3326 and if you aren't too picky about aspect ratio, then why shouldn't they be even considered?

Light bleed on the display can be fixed by buying 30cents worth of black stickers from ali express, and opening the device once. :) Or buying the aluminium version.

'Linux is so hard' issue can be fixed, by using TheRA, which is a build that uses a linux partition for main storage.

I think I made it clear why these are downsides because one isn't really expected to fix a device they bought, especially the hardware. And if TheRA is better, why didn't the company pre-load the device with the FW rather than expect the user to do it by themselves?

No volume rocker is not an issue - as volume in all games by default can be controlled with select+up and down, once they are running on their retroarch cores. And that is the ONLY button combination thats needed or used.

Default brightness can be set in config files, which should better be set to 15-20%, which is a thing you should do, since the Emulation Station brightness adjustment (menu based, not button combo based) doesnt stick.

I again explained why this is an issue and not having a volume rocker and having to rely on hotkeys in this day and age is really a downgrade than anything else.

I maintain, that the reviewer didnt spend a hot hour with this thing, before posting their review. :)

If I spent less than an hour with the device, I wouldn't have noticed all of these flaws.

I have two of them I like them very much. My main issue is, that the older versions (v1) screens seemed better, but v2 solved battery charging issues, so is the one to go with. Also something no one out there mentions.. ;)
Why did you end up buying two of them? If you bought a second one because the v2 has been revised, then it confirms everything I pointed out. But of course, you are free to share your own views on the device in a review of your own in our review section and explain what compelled you to buy 2 of them.

Also, I did mention the revised version in the review and the improvements it brings but I did not get to test it myself. see this line from the review for context:

However, even if the RK2020 got released a few months ago, I learnt that BittBoy issued a revised model shortly after with less rattle, faster charging, the ability to be charged while off and fixed the issue of overheating. This move raises questions regarding whether BittBoy is customer focused or just wanted to release an RK3326 device at a competitive price as a cash grab. It seems like the company is using its customers as QA testers rather than having dedicated QA testers who will help make a polished product. This was a major disappointment, especially those who adopted the first version of the device; but the disappointment did not end there.
 
In a year or so, once these companies have ran through their implicitly agreed incremental update drip feed of the technologies (and lightened many geeky wallets along the way) we'll actually get the final form of this device and it will be a thing of beauty and joy forever.
 
In a year or so, once these companies have ran through their implicitly agreed incremental update drip feed of the technologies (and lightened many geeky wallets along the way) we'll actually get the final form of this device and it will be a thing of beauty and joy forever.
won't hope it'll be quick as a year.
 
I haven't tested those Pi handhelds myself but if the UI/UX is equally bad but still offers better performance than RK3326 and if you aren't too picky about aspect ratio, then why shouldn't they be even considered?

Because you now have a device at a 65USD pricepoint, which beats all of them, and has an actually good screen, and good buttons/input interface. :)

For as bad as the RK2020 is according to this review, its actually a pretty nice device.. ;)

Storytelling like, yes, but the RG350P could actually run all systems it was advertised for well.. Doesnt mean much, when its successor does more than that (SOC wise), and is ridiculed in the interview, for not running all DC, PSP and N64 titles well.

The cut off this generation was powerlimit/performance, not a designer that picked the wrong SOC, they all picked the same, and its a better one than in the RaspPi3, or 4 lite (not 4 mainline, but again, powerconsumption there is too high). :)

Imagine someone buying this device, not caring about the light bleed, not knowing that the v1 RK2020 seemingly had better displayquality, and being happy? ;) For 65 USD? Even playing DC games once in a while?

The default is not 'everyone has a RG350P, is this a valid replacement? ;)

UI and UX is certainly not the Problem, if both of them were praised for years on the Pi.. :) Or to the extent that it is, I have mine set up to boot into retroarch propper at boot, and have retroarch set up to show thumbnails (boxshots) on a 256GB image I put together.

I have no usability or menu speed issue whatsoever. :)

I use one virtual button combo to adjust sound, thats it. Go to the main menue once in a while, when adjusting brightness.

There is light bleed on the transparent plastic shell (its transparent you know), true. And if you complain about it feeling cheep, buy the aluminium version. ;)

The device is not for you if you are allergic to tinkering, or if you already are very happy with a RG350P or similar (in that case, wait for SOCs, that can actually emulate more DC games full speed), and yes the thing is a bit boxy, but corners are rounded, an ergonomics are actually quite good (it rests good in my hands, if held a certain way).

Its no frills, but its good, not just for the price (if there werent the screen downgrade issue). :) Most issues are easily dealt with (OS used, settings used, black stickers or tape, ...) and UI or UX is no different than on other systems. And the chip is the best you currently can get (+/- see Retroid Pocket v2 if that really runs at 1.5Ghz) in that formfactor.

One speaker, yes (and its not a great one, but its sufficiant) its not like you get a great stereo effect at that distance between speakers. No rumble.

But everything it has is actually quite good. Especially screen - and buttons on the v1. (Which you shouldnt buy anymore...)
--

On the 3:2 screen issue in general.

This isnt optimal. About 95% of games played on those systems would benefit from a 4:3 screen, the size of the screen on both the RK2020 and the RG350/1P is still too small to really enjoy more narrative (and art) driven games (except for GBA which dealt with those limitations better in design language), but it is a concession to people also wanting to play GBA or PSP games, which would have huge bars if you'd leave the 4:3 panel unmasked (RK2020 actually has a 4:3 panel but the bezel and software mask it to 3:2). Because those things are small and have a novelty factor to it, it currently doesnt matter so much.

But imho the big selling factor for a bigger screen retro device would actually be a good 4:3 screen. It could be more compact (easier to hold) than a Switch or Smartphone with a controller and you'd have 1000s of games you could enjoy at a proper aspect ratio with no borders - which today in general is not possible anymore. (Dont have a 4:3 screen in my home anymore)

At the same time, you would forego 'gamestreaming service compatibility' - which is a tough call (more mainstream audience compatible). But if they do, I'd actually be very interested in future generations of those retro devices. :)

3:2 just feels like an odd compromise to me... :) And again, to really enjoy narrative experiences, a screen thats a bit larger would help. :)
 
i won't be interested in any of these until they stop using rock chips and give the system at least 2gb of ram. they'll never be competent devices until they can do that.
 
To load the Roms to the Micro SD card, you can install the TheRA firmware. I will put the link as below. You can just copy and move the Roms from your PC to the Micro SD card. With such a good price, I do'n think RK2020 deserve 4.5.

https://github.com/christianhaitian/rk2020/wiki/TheRA-2.4-NTFS
it might be cheap but the issues can't be overlooked as they show it's not a polished product (in fact the company itself released a revised version shortly after)
 
it might be cheap but the issues can't be overlooked as they show it's not a polished product (in fact the company itself released a revised version shortly after)
oof. that makes it hard to trust what you are buying then
 
I made the mistake of buying the BittBoy Pocket Go based on all the raving reviews on YouTube. After using it for a day it became apparent that all these reviews were paid or provided with a free unit so the YouTubers could make content with it.

My unit had a chip in the front glass, and even exhibited quality issues where the right button on the D-Pad was impossible to press (turns out the rubber pads didn't have conductive material in that button). The emulation was barely passable for SNES and GBA was very stuttery.

The OS was barely usable and relied on community contributions to even get it up to a somewhat usable level but it's still not great.

If this was anything to go by, this unit will be another crappy cash grab. I believe there are good emulation devices from China, some companies do put effort for a good product. It's just not with BittBoy.
 
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I made the mistake of buying the BittBoy Pocket Go based on all the raving reviews on YouTube. After using it for a day it became apparent that all these reviews were paid or provided with a free unit so the YouTubers could make content with it.

My unit had a chip in the front glass, and even exhibited quality issues where the right button on the D-Pad was impossible to press (turns out the rubber pads didn't have conductive material in that button). The emulation was barely passable for SNES and GBA was very stuttery.

The OS was barely usable and relied on community contributions to even get it up to a somewhat usable level but it's still not great.

If this was anything to go by, this unit will be another crappy cash grab. I believe there are good emulation devices from China, some companies do put effort for a good product. It's just not with BittBoy.
with these devices it's better to wait and read/watch reviews as well as read feedback from consumers on Reddit or other forums. Generally it's good not to buy them once they launch but wait some months as a new version would be released or even the software gets better. The latter is usually the case, even if the hardware is good, like with the new RG351P. UI/UX really is a bummer with these handhelds.

also, I reviewed the New PocketGo V2 and RG350P recently. The latter is recommended if you're looking in a better handheld
 
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Too bad it's not good. I wish the Chinese would move away from those ingenic CPUs like they tried here.
 
apparently they are selling a newer version of this on the link mentioned. funny enough, it says it removes all the cons you listed.
https://retromimi.com/products/rk2020

i wonder how much of this is true to be honest. obviously i doubt they would blatantly lie but you never know. chances are, they will sell their old stock before new. or... that's just what i'd do lol.
 
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