Wii Desoldering Help!

Discussion in 'Wii - Hardware, Devices and Utilities' started by stanokaka, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. stanokaka
    OP

    stanokaka Newbie

    Newcomer
    3
    0
    Sep 2, 2010
    Hey, I'm currently trying to desolder all of the ports from the nintendo wii motherboard (don't ask why) like the gamecube controllers, av port etc... And I'm not having any luck. I'm using a 30w desoldering iron. I'm waiting for about 1 hour for the desoldering iron to fully heat up, then I'm putting it over the joints and yet the solder on the joints are not turning to solder and I'm holding it on the solder for about 10 seconds as I'm scared to damage the wii mobo. Does anyone have any suggestions or a possible fix that will melt the solder?
     
  2. hybridLearner

    hybridLearner Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    63
    0
    Mar 7, 2010
    United States
    USA
    You can try using some wicking material, like braided copper. It may help transfer the solder off of the wii.
     
  3. raulpica

    raulpica With your drill, thrust to the sky!

    Supervisor
    11,036
    7,349
    Oct 23, 2007
    Italy
    PowerLevel: 9001
    You should also use some good soldering flux, along with it. And btw, good luck, removing ports without using a Desoldering Pump is usually a big pain in the back.
     
  4. Smogen

    Smogen Advanced Member

    Newcomer
    55
    5
    Dec 11, 2009
    United States
    i agree. i would pick up a pump because it will suck all of the solder out of the hole. braids might suck up a majority of it but I doubt it will get all of it.
     
  5. cobleman

    cobleman GBAtemp Maniac

    Member
    1,458
    19
    Jun 23, 2009
    Australia
    You need at least 350C (660F) to remove lead free solder. Have plenty of flux and use the braid
     
  6. thieves like us

    thieves like us chaos personified

    Member
    1,057
    16
    Jul 17, 2003
    United States
    left of the pond
    I'm assuming that your soldering iron is not temperature selectable. remember that lead-based solder takes a minimum of 370 degrees F to melt and lead-free about 480 degrees. additionally, the larger the connection, the longer that the solder will take to reach a sustainable temperature to melt.

    in addition to a pump, for desoldering, you want to use a thicker, chistle style tip so that you are increasing the surface area of the heat transfer from the iron to the board and solder.

    flux is mainly used to prevent the surfaces from oxidizing and reducing the surface tension of the solder to provide a better join and will not necessarily help for de-soldering areas.
     
  7. raulpica

    raulpica With your drill, thrust to the sky!

    Supervisor
    11,036
    7,349
    Oct 23, 2007
    Italy
    PowerLevel: 9001
    I mainly use flux to distribute the heat a little bit more evenly, considering that (at least the one I use) turns liquid and that liquids transmits heat.

    I've verified numerous times that desoldering without flux takes a lot more time (and we all know that the less time you stay on there with your iron, the better).
    So dunno, it might just be my flux, but it actually happens, for me.
     
  8. thieves like us

    thieves like us chaos personified

    Member
    1,057
    16
    Jul 17, 2003
    United States
    left of the pond
    that makes sense. alternatively, you can add a small amount of solder as well to get the melting process started since the thin strand will melt extremely quickly and help transfer the heat like you mentioned with the flux.