Video Cropping Tool?

Discussion in 'Computer Software and Operating Systems' started by Jiehfeng, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. Jiehfeng
    OP

    Jiehfeng A not so serious guy tbh... ;D

    Member
    4,244
    1,993
    Aug 15, 2012
    New Caledonia
    Inside your miiind, and poof.
    I need some kind of cropping tool that can import ".ts" files and crop out black borders of the video while keeping all the settings of the video and not losing any framerate or quality. Is there such a program?
     
  2. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

    Member
    4,363
    542
    Jan 14, 2009
    United States
    You have two options,

    * Use container such as .mkv which allows "soft-crop". Black borders are still there in the video track, but during video playback the player omits displaying black borders.
    * Actual cropping. This can be easily done in Handbrake or any video encoding program. This requires re-encoding of the video, resulting quality loss.
     
    Jiehfeng likes this.
  3. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

    pip Reporter
    23,360
    9,150
    Nov 21, 2005
    You should never lose any framerate in a video unless you ask it to, give or take the very strange world of variable frame rate.

    trumpet-205 has the right idea. However in my more cowboyish world there are two other options
    Avisynth or some other frameserver
    Loading a .ts and cropping it should be well within real time capabilities of a system.

    Tversity or some other media server type arrangement. Again you should be able to crop it and have it play back on a device but it is just streaming it then you keep the original .ts file.

    Option the crazy.
    Encode to a lossless format, cropping along the way. I hope you have hard drive space if doing this.

    If you want it for a game or something though (I believe some of the PSP stuff is basically a transport stream/.ts) you might have to take a quality hit, or code up a soft overlay.
     
    Jiehfeng likes this.
  4. Jiehfeng
    OP

    Jiehfeng A not so serious guy tbh... ;D

    Member
    4,244
    1,993
    Aug 15, 2012
    New Caledonia
    Inside your miiind, and poof.
    Thankfully, I found a way around cropping. I changed the settings on my capture card so it now doesn't record black bars. :D
    So I found this video editor called wondershare video editor, after all the editing in my video, the settings for the exported video only gives me the option to encode in 30fps and below.
    Not 60fps, why is this? Other video editing softwares too only gives the option of 30fps.
     
  5. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

    pip Reporter
    23,360
    9,150
    Nov 21, 2005
    I should have clicked you were capturing when you mentioned .ts, my bad. It may vary here for you if you are capturing actual TV, home video, game footage and more besides.

    There is software out there that will encode in 60fps, in fact it is nothing spectacular at all. However I sense we are going to have to discuss video concepts first, to that end *warning, boring technical video discussion incoming*

    First it may only be that your capture card can capture in 30fps -- not all that much originally went above 30 fps and technically not a lot there even got to actual 30 fps (more on that later). If the video encoder is sensible it will try to only give you that option, likewise if the encoder is set to mimic a given format (say DVD, blu ray.....) it may stop that from happening.

    Is the source interlaced? If so the f in fps in this case stands for "fields per second" if it is telling you it is at 60 fps. Interlacing is a horrible thing that stuck around because of legacy reasons and you may be facing it here ( http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/06/25/the_future_of_moving_images_the_eyes_have_it/ goes into a bit of depth here). There are ways of increasing interlaced framerates from 30 to 60 or 25 to 50 that are not nasty and time consuming frame rate conversion type things, personally I do not think it does anything and so do most video editors hence most deinterlacing turning X fields per second into X/2 frames per second.

    Pulldowns.... interlaced I can deal with, pulldowns are just horrible and it actually gets worse from there. Film cameras were traditionally 24fps (less for some really old stuff -- what bad video editors cause old war footage to look like everybody is on the Benny Hill show), PAL is 25fps so it is sped up but you can not speed up to NTSC (30fps). Few things were captured at 30fps so frames/fields were played multiple times (the most common being the so called 3:2 pulldown but various people did all sorts of things). Modern cameras and game consoles do output at full frame rates, also CGI footage tended to be rendered at 30fps which is fun for those ripping DVDs properly. To finish it off you also have "pulldown flags", various video decoders could see these flags and do their own pulldown at decode time. Naturally not everything supports this so how it plays out varies a bit, this is also where some people started getting into variable frame rate video.

    If it turns out you have true 30fps footage and want it to be 60fps it is possible, personally I do not suggest it and it will see your encode times probably increase by a factor of 10 (no exaggeration there) unless you do just do the basic replay frames thing which is just pointless really.
     
    Jiehfeng likes this.
  6. Jiehfeng
    OP

    Jiehfeng A not so serious guy tbh... ;D

    Member
    4,244
    1,993
    Aug 15, 2012
    New Caledonia
    Inside your miiind, and poof.
    Technically, my capture card records in 60fps. Even my video player, SMPlayer shows "59.94fps" and windows properties. But video editing softwares don't give me the option to encode in 60fps. But is there any loss when re-encoding 60fps in so called 30fps? Is there any lag?
     
  7. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

    pip Reporter
    23,360
    9,150
    Nov 21, 2005
    In that case I would check to see if your video encoder has a "DVD compatible" option or profile selected or something. It might well be that a given instance of software does not have the option to go that high, few gain real benefits from going to that, but it is really nothing special in video world.

    Loss.... this gets a bit contentious.
    Most people see reasonably fluid motion at around 17fps (maybe slightly less) with 24 being pretty good. This then leads into the PAL speedup and NTSC pulldown stuff I was on about earlier. The fractions under the 25, 30 and 60 are other legacy things (originally colour, various other things now) but I will ignore that for now.
    Computer games would be a potential exception here. As part of video you inevitably capture a bit of motion blur and this makes things better (though there is the related concept of shutter speed). Computer generated imagery, which does include a lot of modern films, seems to lack this and often when it does happen it is bad motion blur (everything blurs) rather than relative motion blur (the object in motion then motion blurs, or blurs more), also why some game playing types are opposed to motion blur. However if you increase the framerate again, where this starts to get good is a matter for debate, though in most cases this means it is upped to 60fps (if only because of vsync). There is definitely something to be said for having your game aim for 60fps (60fps dropping to 40fps is not half as bad as 30 to 10 after all) but a lot of the rest of the time I am not convinced it is much more than the video equivalent of the audiophool thing.