Mac OSX & .wbfs files

Discussion in 'Wii - Backup Loaders' started by rich333, Jan 10, 2011.

Jan 10, 2011

Mac OSX & .wbfs files by rich333 at 12:13 PM (5,855 Views / 0 Likes) 9 replies

  1. rich333
    OP

    Member rich333 GBAtemp Regular

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    Hey, so I just got my mac about a month ago.

    Now I have some Wii ISO files and need to get them converted into .wbfs files to transfer on to my USB Hard Drive.

    Can't seem to find any apps to do this (yes, I have searched but hopefully I'm just missing something - hopefully)

    Is the only way really to split the ISO files into 2 .rar files (cos there over 4GB) then transfer it on, then fix up on a Windows PC with one of the many apps??!! I'm really hoping not!
    Help!!
     
  2. yo bootyhole

    Newcomer yo bootyhole Member

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    I googled 'wbfs for macos x' and it was the first link.
    If the link fails, google 'wbfs for macos x mediafire'.

    If you're wondering, you could just install Windows on your mac via bootcamp and or on one of your partitions and work from there as you don't need a windows pc.
    Or you could just use wine.

    And a mac pc is the same as a windows pc, just software differences.
    Or if it's a PPC-Mac, then that's a whole different story.
     
  3. Blue-K

    Member Blue-K No right of appeal.

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    Wiimms ISO Tools would be the best choice, if you are a bit familiar with the Terminal.
     
  4. cambric

    Member cambric GBAtemp Fan

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    I definitely use wbfs_file by Oggzee...

    I run it from the terminal by means of the following script which automatically converts the .iso files in .wbfs files....

    Feel free to use my script...

    Code:
    #! /bin/sh
    #
    #ÂÂ convert_all shell script for MacOSX - v2.0 by Cambo
    #
    #ÂÂ PRELIMINARIES
    #ÂÂ 1) Save this file (wherever you want) with the name "convert_all"
    #ÂÂ 2) Give this file the exec rights with the terminal command "chmod 777 convert_all"
    #
    #ÂÂ SETTINGS
    #ÂÂ 
    #ÂÂ 1) set the path to the folder containing the wbfs_file unix application (v1.4 or above)
    APP="/Users/cambric/Desktop/ROBA_WII/DaProvare/";ÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂÂ # for exampleÂÂAPP="/Applications/"
    #ÂÂ 2) set the path to the source folder containing the iso files
    SRC="/Users/cambric/Desktop/ROBA_WII/DaProvare/ISO/";ÂÂÂÂÂÂ# for exampleÂÂSRC="/Volumes/HD1/source/"
    #ÂÂ 3) set the path to the destination folder where the wbfs files will be saved
    DEST="/Users/cambric/Desktop/ROBA_WII/DaProvare/WBFS/";ÂÂÂÂ# for exampleÂÂDEST="/Volumes/HD2/destination/"
    #
    #ÂÂ USAGE
    #ÂÂ Just double click on this script and all the .iso files in the SRC folder
    #ÂÂ will be converted into the DEST folder
    #
    cd $APP;
    find $SRC -name "*.iso" -exec ./wbfs_file {} convert $DEST \;
     
  5. rich333
    OP

    Member rich333 GBAtemp Regular

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    thanks guys! gotta get familiar with terminal - i'll try them - at least now i know what i'm looking for
     
  6. cerebr_al

    Newcomer cerebr_al Member

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    Here's a tute I wrote a few years ago..


    TUTORIAL: Convert an .iso to a .wbfs using a Mac (potential for Linux users too)

    As anyone with a mac will know, there are few programs that directly relate to game hacking.

    There are plenty for pcs and sure, you can use bootcamp, parallels or wine to get many of these programs to run on a mac but if you don't want to install any of these and be able to reduce you isos to a more efficient size using native macosx, here is my way to do it.

    Before I start I must acknowledge that the actual file that does the converting was not created by me but (as mentioned above), by Oggzee.

    As also mentioned above, thanks Cambo for the script.

    I found out about it all of this about two years ago through a mod (rduke), on another forum. Many thanks to him as well.

    Now this tutorial presumes you have a mac (I can only vouch for this being compatible with snowleopard as I haven't got lion yet), and some .iso files that you've ripped previously and now want the convenience of being able to convert them to .wbfs without have to boot up the like of Wii Backup Manager on virtual windows or a pc.

    NB: This also avoids using other macosx wbfs managers that require a WBFS formatted disc to write to. If you follow this tutorial correctly, you will be able to write a .wbfs file on any Wii/softmod supported HDD file system (eg FAT32, NTFS, HFS+, EXT2/3).

    That said you might also note that the below may very well work on Linux so if you want a .wbfs converter that will work on Linux, you may also be in for a treat.

    OK, if the above is still you lets begin.

    Firstly, download the following attached file: wbfs_file_2.9.zip

    Unzip the file and you will notice there are a number of folders. Open the mac_osx folder and copy and paste the wbfs_file into the Applications folder (use the wbfs_file from the Linux folder if that is the os your applying this script to - obviously you know where to paste this file in your os).

    That's the simple part.

    Second (the not so simple part), open a blank text file with TextEdit (I'm using this but any text editor will work just as well).
    Inside you will have to cut, paste and configure the following script:


    Code:
    #! /bin/sh
    #
    #   convert_all shell script for MacOSX - v1.0 by Cambo
    #
    #   PRELIMINARIES
    #   1) Copy the file wbfs_file (v1.4 or above) in the  /Applications/  system folder
    #   2) Save this file (wherever you want) with the name "convert_all"
    #   3) Give this file the exec rights with the terminal command "chmod 777 convert_all"
    #
    #   SETTINGS
    #   set the following paths for the source and destination folders
    #
    SRC="/Users/myname/Desktop/source/";		  # you can have also  SRC="/Volumes/HD1/source/"
    DEST="/Users/myname/Desktop/destination/";	# you can have also  SRC="/Volumes/HD2/destination/"
    #
    #   USAGE
    #   Just double click on this script and all the .iso files in the SRC folder
    #   will be converted into the DEST folder, the info .txt files will be created there too
    #
    cd /Applications/;
    find $SRC -name "*.iso" -exec ./wbfs_file -l f2 {} convert $DEST \;
    
    Now, as you can see, the script has comments which basically tell you what to do however, I'm here to explain what it's actually saying.

    Before you start typing anything into the script, you have to decide where your source (SRC), folder will be located and where your destination (DEST), folder will be. This is entirely up to you however for the purposes of this tutorial I will explain with an example.

    I want to put my iso in a folder called game_iso (you can call it whatever you like) and it will be in my 'home' directory - on a mac, this directory as an icon of a house on it.

    I will call this directory 'home' but you need to call it whatever name appears in Finder to the right of that house icon.

    The full path of my game_iso folder would be (you can see this in Finder), Macintosh HD/users/home/game_iso

    However, in the script above you need to replace the line:

    Code:
    SRC="/Users/myname/Desktop/source/";
    
    with:

    Code:
    SRC=/Users/home/game_iso/
    
    OK, that's the source taken care of, now for the destination.

    Testing this I've found the the smallest .wbfs files are written to a FAT32 formatted HDD so I wrote the next part of the script to send the .wbfs file to the FAT32 partition on an external hard drive and to a folder named 'wbfs'. I've named this partition 'WII_FAT', but you will have to put the name of your corresponding partition and/or drive - it will be the name that shows up on your desktop when the partition/drive is mounted.

    This is how you write that part of the script:

    Code:
    DEST=/Volumes/WII_FAT/wbfs/
    
    our new line replaces this one from the script above:

    Code:
    DEST="/Users/myname/Desktop/destination/";
    
    You don't have to save to an external drive. If you want to save back to your mac hdd you can.
    Here's an example of the script you might write if you wanted to destination to be a folder called 'wbfs' your desktop:

    Code:
    DEST=/Users/home/Desktop/wbfs/
    
    And that's it!

    All you have to do now is save the script and give your mac permission to access it. (I've edited this bit from the original so if you've had a go and it didn't work - this additional bit will fix it.

    Go to File (in TextEdit), select Save As and then give your file a name (can be whatever), and save as a 'plain text encoding' Unicode (UTF-8), .txt file.

    Once you've saved this file, open up Terminal (it's located in Applications/Utilities), and type the following:

    Code:
    chmod 777 /Users/home/Desktop/nameofscript.txt
    
    where 'nameofscript.txt' is obviously the name of your script - don't forget the extension.

    Lastly, go back to the file on your desktop and click on it so it is highlighted (as you would to change the name of a file), to change the extension (Please note: the extension may not be visible at this stage - it doesn't matter you can just type the following anyway). Type the extension .command after the file name.

    OK, now place the iso or iso's (this will convert all the iso's in your designated source folder simultaneously!), in the folder you chose earlier and make sure your destination partition/drive is mounted.

    Once the file and drive are in place, just double click on the script file and a terminal window will pop up and you will be able to view the program as it runs and completes the conversion/s like magic.

    And yes, this should also work under linux. Just compile wbfs_file or put the pre-compiled version to e.g. /usr/local/bin (or some place else that gets searched for binaries), make the script executable by issuing a "chmod u+x script.sh" and then you should be good to go
     
  7. Monotremata

    Newcomer Monotremata Newbie

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    Just Google Wii Backup Fusion and save yourself all that trouble. Works perfect on my Mac Pro and my old G5.
     
  8. cerebr_al

    Newcomer cerebr_al Member

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    Yes, but you're stuck with all your games on a WBFS partition (which I have found problematic). The solution above is for every other format and very simple when you've got it set up.

    You have a config file sitting on your desktop (or wherever). You place an iso in your designated directory and then you click on the config file. The program starts up and rips the .wbfs file from the iso to your external HDD (or internal if you prefer). You can copy/paste a bunch of isos and it'll do them one after the other and even show how it's progressing as it does it's job.

    Because your HDD is readable by your Mac you can then do with the .wbfs files as you like without having to rely on a manager at all.
     
  9. aab203

    Newcomer aab203 Newbie

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    Wii Backup Fusion will convert .iso to .wbfs, which can be used on non WBFS formatted partitions. I have been using this app for a little while now to put .wbfs games on to my FAT32 formatted HDD. No need for WBFS partitions or managers.

    Hope that helps.
     
  10. cerebr_al

    Newcomer cerebr_al Member

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    I don't use it, so from my perspective - as you can see above, it's easy to be mistaken.

    Thanks for the clarification. :)
     

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