What unsual animals have you eaten?

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by leafeon34, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. leafeon34
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    leafeon34 意地悪な男の人

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    Normally when we talk about meat that we eat, we refer to chicken, beef, lamb, pork and seafood; sometimes duck and and turkey and occasionally goat, quail and crocodile are included. There are other meats available if you're willing to try something different. I've had goat, crocodile, kangaroo, donkey, horse, snake, rabbit, quail, dolphin, turtle and frog.

    There's an interesting story behind one of the times I ate frog. I was at a shopping centre in China and went to a restaurant selling 煲仔飯 (rice in a pot), and ordered 田鸡煲仔飯. I assumed that since 田 means farm and 鸡 means chicken, 田鸡 means farmland chicken. After I started eating, I realised the meat seems quite different to chicken so I looked up 田鸡 in the dictionary and learned that it actually means frog.
     
    Last edited by leafeon34, Jul 7, 2019
  2. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    "occasionally crocodile"?
    I would have said that is a fairly exotic one. Certainly can be found here but you would have to go out of your way.

    Anyway my dad and I were having this conversation a while back, and as we were sitting in the US that would also mean we knock lamb off the commonly eaten meats list. Tragic if you ask me but having tried some American lamb it often tasted like beef... nothing like the UK lamb, Australian lamb or kiwi Lamb I am used to. I will say however I am not a huge fan of mutton (adult sheep) and I should also say veal (meat from young cows/calves) is not my favourite thing either.

    Lidl around here do kangaroo, ostrich and one other from time to time. Had those.

    Goat is a bit harder to get around here these days but can be found, or found seasonally. I tend to have goat curry rather than goat like I would another meat where seared and minimal seasoning is often the order of the day, on the other hand if the pub is doing goat I will probably have that however it comes.

    No venison (deer) on your list? Common enough around here really, even more so if you wanted one hit on the road. I will use venison mince instead of beef happily if it is available and venison by itself as well in steak form, though I did slice some up and stick it in a curry the other week and it was delicious. I have probably tried the different types of deer you can eat but couldn't tell you much about any differences.

    Horse is hard to find in the UK but easy enough in France. Same for donkey. Had horse though. Harder to cook well and not a great deal to say about it really.

    Speaking of France then frog legs is something you can find -- in the UK frogs is an insult for the French (they return with rosbif aka roast beef which I don't get as roast beef is delicious). You also have snails there too.

    I don't know that I have knowingly eaten cat or dog but... there are some dodgy curry houses up north.

    Rabbits are easy enough to come by and rabbit stew is great. Hares less easy to find unless I go get some myself (I can't be bothered and people seem to really like hares right now so probably best to avoid that one).

    Reindeer. I think I upset someone once as I was outside Ikea around Christmas and they had one in a pen to show the kids so I said I had to go inside to get its brother to eat. I don't even want to get into the linguistic mess that is elk, moose and whatnot wherever I might have been at the time but probably had a nibble on those as well.

    I could add boar to the list but then I would realistically have to also figure out all the rare breeds of pigs and whatnot that get sliced up and many of those taste somewhat different, though that might be down to diet as well (compare a salt marsh lamb to a bog standard grassy field one). Buffalo gets added to the list too in that case, not sure if I also did bison.

    I will thank you not to bring up squirrels as food. If I am starving in the woods then so be it.

    There was a place selling beaver salami where I was at a few months ago. Not bad.

    Looking at one of the websites featuring such things then I see python on the list. Never nibbled any snakes I don't think so might have to correct that if I am going to do a nice big order.

    My dad had bear ham, mainly as he found a guy he trusts to make it (eat bad bear and you will know about it... possibly for years afterwards), so he won that one.

    There was once an exotic meat truck in a car show I was at. Think I had an ibex burger that day, possibly a nibble on some zebra too. To my eternal shame I don't think I have ever tried alpaca, llama or camel but I noticed a few llama in a village not far from here so might go see what they do with theirs.

    Do we have to do odd parts? I love lamb liver, and lamb heart casserole is also a favourite. Kidneys I like well enough but usually only have it in steak and kidney (usually corrupted as snake and pygmy) pie as cooking kidneys is a rather anti social activity*. Not a great fan of tongue and brain is nothing special every time I have tried it. Tripe and other/remaining offal... edible I guess but I will never seek it. Minor exception as the Scottish DNA shines through a bit and I will happily gobble up haggis if it is a good one. Liver of pig and chicken are the main other two you will find around here... I will take lamb every time but will eat those in a pate.
    Milk wise then cow only for me really -- not a fan of sheep or goat, still have to find some reindeer. You can definitely keep your non animal produced milks.

    *client of mine does curries pretty much all the time and was over in Germany and found some kidneys so did kidney curry in a flat there. If you know much about Germany and cooking smells there then you can imagine how well that one went over.

    Birds then. Duck is as common as you like -- I will probably be able to find it more easily than goat really. Just about every Chinese restaurant will serve a duck dish and a lot of Indians will as well. I quite like a whole duck slow roasted on a bbq over many hours -- my brothers and I are greedy bastards so given the unlimited meat that is most bbq then you should probably take a hint when we stop before it is done. I am assuming turkey is on your common as dirt list, and frankly I think I would rather eat dirt than most turkey -- my dad feels the same way, if not worse, so when he said he had pressure vessel cooked turkey that tasted nice I will believe him but given most people can't operate a deep fryer without killing everybody then I am not about to advocate people go out and get one of those..
    Goose, pheasant, partridge, pigeon (probably squab as well but I doubt I would know the taste difference), ostrich I already mentioned, guinea fowl, poussin (technically that is just a young chicken), think I have had emu and that is about it for that one (swans are super illegal to eat here, and sparrows are not worth the effort, gull eggs are one thing but never eaten a gull but always wanted to try the raisins on a piece of string method of catching them).

    If I have to do fish then I will be here all week. Mostly saltwater fish in the UK and places I find myself, though it seems I have a fondness for freshwater ones as well. Haddock, Skate, Bream and sprats if they are curried are my big four though. The middle two you kind of have to try but haddock I usually describe as a tastier version of cod, so much so I don't eat cod unless it is the only thing available.
     
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  3. Sonic Angel Knight

    Sonic Angel Knight GBAtemp Legend

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    Does lobster count as unusual? I only remember eating it once, when I order lobster cantonese from the chinese restaurant that was in my neighborhood. Can't recall it being a good experience. Was expensive and hard to eat, think there was some odd flavors and being too strong. Plus I remember the crustation staring at me, the whole thing in tact. Eyes and all, it wasn't easy to believe it wasn't alive. :blink:
     
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  4. qqq1

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    I went to a sportsmen's dinner at my gun club a few months ago. There were many non standard meats but the only thing I could name right this second was the racoon and beaver tacos. It really all just tasted like meat.
     
  5. SickPuppy

    SickPuppy New Member

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    I've had buffalo, rabbit, deer, goose, duck, pheasant, and probably some others I cannot remember.
     
  6. Seliph

    Seliph Professional Orphan

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    Not sure if this counts but I've had a Mcdonalds hamburger
     
  7. leafeon34
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    leafeon34 意地悪な男の人

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    I nearly forgot, I’ve had rabbit a few times in Australia and my friend took me out to a snake restaurant in Hong Kong a few years ago. They sold snake wine too but I didn’t try any.

    I haven’t seen the meat of any of the other animals you mentioned for sale before. If I go to the UK, which I probably will next year, I’ll give some of them a shot.

    I had goat, rabbit, quail and kangaroo in Australia and the others overseas. Crocodile at a food festival in Malaysia, horse at a restaurant in Japan and the rest in China.

    You can buy crocodile in Australia if you know where to go, but I never did. It’s easier to find than the other exotic meats mentioned in this thread.

    Fox is the most interesting meat I’d like to eat. We don’t normally eat carnivorous mammals. I like Naruto too much. Live foxes are easy enough to find in Australia, but I’d probably be breaking a few laws if I went to a local park, set a trap and slaughtered the fox which walked into it.

    Turkey is a more common meat which I forgot about.
     
    Last edited by leafeon34, Jul 7, 2019
  8. Dungeonseeker

    Dungeonseeker GBAtemp Fan

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    Rabbit, goat, mutton, pheasant, goose, venison, crocodile, camel, ostrich, frog, snail, wild boar and probably some I can't remember.

    I actually have some wild boar in my freezer right now.
     
    Last edited by Dungeonseeker, Jul 7, 2019
  9. alexander1970

    alexander1970 GBA Fan

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    Hello. :)

    A long time ago in an "australian" Restaurant:

    - crocodile
    - ostrich
    - kangoroo

    On my time in th "hospitality industry" (I hope this is the right designation for hotel and restaurant trade):

    - frog
    - escargot
    - shark


    Evertime I thinked and hoped it was that which was on the menu........but it tasted very good,
    (in that case also all asian food and if I think about it longer ALL food in ANY restaurant....:rofl2: ).


    Thank you and Bon appetit.:)
     
  10. Cyan

    Cyan GBATemp's lurking knight

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    duck, rabbits, turkey, mutton/sheep/lamb, horse are not unusual in France. Though beef is more common than horse.
    also see urchin, Mussels, Oysters are common. I don't know how common they are elsewhere.

    Often:
    Beef/veal
    Pig/pork
    turkey
    chicken
    rabbits
    lamb
    duck



    few fishes, but nothing unusual.
    bream (mostly), tuna, cod/aiglefin/colin, salmon, trout, etc.
    octopus, squid, Mussels, shrimp


    less frequently or once only:
    Horse
    donkey (as sausage)
    quail
    pheasant? I don't remember
    venison/deer
    wild boar
    escargot (not a fan. It's chewy and not that tasty)
    frog (that's actually good!)
    shark
    lobster


    things I'm willing to try:
    ostrich
    kangaroo
    goat
    espadon/swordfish
    crocodile? where do we find that?
    snake (apparently it's not that good)
    guinea pig / Kui (ahhh, I have them as pet)
    big red crabs
    probably more (fox, etc.)


    Things I'm not willing:
    insects or spiders
    dolphin (poor thing, probably illegal)
    Squirrel (I think it's illegal here?). Not because i find it disgusting, just I think they are protected species. I might actually eat that.
    turtle (not sure it taste good? poor thing?)
    see urchin (that orange thing just looks disgusting)
    Oyster (I don't want to try, but every french like it!)


    Things I don't know, just because of culture and probably illegal here:
    cats and dogs



    Now, What am I eating today?
     
    Last edited by Cyan, Jul 7, 2019
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  11. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Sea urchin would be a speciality thing if it is available at all around here. Mussels are pretty common, though you need to make sure you are at a decent restaurant here as gritty mussels are horrible. I also had curried mussels the other month... hard to understate how delicious that was. Oysters are common enough, though some of a delicacy rather than something you would have a plate full of as a main course (starter, side dish, late evening snack* sort of thing). Winkles would also want to be added to that list.

    *they are also considered an aphrodisiac (aphrodisiaque) so yeah.

    Swordfish is delicious. If you have someone good at cooking fish and you can find some then do it, especially if you like bream. Don't know what I would suggest as a sauce and I prefer it fairly plain as these things go -- few herbs, some salt, maybe some butter and pan seared swordfish steak... I would not go for garlic at first but could see it working and definitely don't be slathering it in a white sauce or anything based on tomato (and I say that in spite of the fact I hate tomatoes and they hate me).

    Dolphins are bastards and pigs are probably about as intelligent. I can see why they would spear fish tuna but no qualms there from me.

    Surprised to see the objection to squirrel though. For the most part squirrels are rats with good PR/fuzzy tails. Don't know if it is illegal in France, did a quick search (albeit in English) and did not have anything come back.

    Do want to try guinea pig as well actually.

    Forgot about insects. Ignoring that chocolate has a surprisingly high number of insect parts it is allowed to contain (so much so that most of the poor bastards that are considered to be allergic to chocolate are probably actually allergic to insects). Anyway done various chocolate covered ants, crickets and possibly a locust as well. As far as straight roast insects then don't know that I have. Have not learned to keep my mouth shut when out on a bike so had a few there as well. Did try snails many years ago in France but it is basically just like chewy garlic butter with the amount of seasoning done so eh really, do like however that snails were likely one of the first domesticated species that humans ever did (they found a cave somewhere that showed people breeding them to be larger and larger).


    Other than the birds (other than chicken and turkey you tend to find those processed and in plastic, pheasant only at times of year when it is shooting season) if you go to a normal size or big size supermarket it is going to beef, lamb and pork, and livers of pig and lamb (seldom see beef liver in normal supermarkets, more likely to see chicken liver), maybe some kidney and heart too. The kangaroo and ostrich stuff is a few times a year thing in one or two less popular supermarkets, or a specialist order. Goat you can find on high street butchers but not all will (if you can find somewhere with a decent Caribbean population or ask them where they get it then you will be more likely to find it), and it might be somewhat seasonal. Same for venison, rabbit and boar, though there are butchers specialising in wild foods and game which will probably have all three. Sometimes you might some venison mince or a few cuts of it in a plastic wrap in a single solitary chiller in a supermarket but I would not know where to go right now to definitely find any in a supermarket. Squirrel not outside of certain restaurants. Many places around have a rare and local breeds butcher if you wanted to do that one as well.

    Reindeer wise then the only place I can consistently get that is Ikea, and even then it is usually just salami where it is mixed with pork or mini salami bites.

    For the most part most UK peeps you will speak to have probably never knowingly eaten anything other than beef, lamb, chicken, duck, turkey and pork + whatever fish they like. Beyond that most below about 55 have probably never eaten anything other than the "normal" cuts of those either (give or take whatever they mince up to make a cheapo pork pie or "mechanically recovered meat" that people shove in sandwiches), and those above 55 will likely only have had heart, tripe, liver and kidney (outside of the steak and kidney pie popular in fish and chip shops) when they were kids. Other than them leaving fat on the cuts, the cuts being slightly different in some cases and lamb being super popular (it would be very strange to be a dedicated meat eater here that never had lamb, though as it is expensive then maybe not as an everyday thing) it is all pretty American these days which is something of a shame -- other than it meaning liver is dirt cheap then basic muscle meat lacks certain things that connective tissue and other such things have in far greater quantities.


    As for Australia then most times the topic has been brought up then on kangaroo I usually hear "urgh that is dog meat mate". Now that usually means it is genuinely overlooked (and given you can find it cheap in the UK that is quite likely) or the locals are saving it as a hidden delicacy.
     
  12. Cyan

    Cyan GBATemp's lurking knight

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    I found that they are protected and controlled species in France and Europe. They can't be owned, captured, killed, sold, imported, reproduced, taken (even already dead) etc. specifically the orange one (Sciurus vulgaris) since 1976 and all other species since 2010.
    there are different laws for different squirrel species, but they apply mostly for capturing and owning as pet or zoo. Though, all species are forbidden to be released (except orange squirrel and marmot which are naturally present in Alps) because they disrupt natural selection and flora.
     
    Last edited by Cyan, Jul 7, 2019
  13. Stwert

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    Does the other half count? :P
     
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  14. TheRealKokichi

    TheRealKokichi Member

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    I haven't really had much "unusual", but I did eat rabbit once, which seems to be uncommon. I don't really have much though, because once when my mom was younger, she thought she got a pet bunny, but it wasn't a pet at all... and it makes her sad to think of it. We stick to the traditional meats of our country, haha.
     
  15. mrdude

    mrdude GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    I'll eat anything with a face (apart from human - suppose it depends how hungry you are), strangest thing is wild boar - it was very tough - maybe it was overcooked. I do love a bit of deer though, there's loads round where I live, you see them quite often and they get run over quite frequently.
    I've eaten Iguana lizards - they taste like creamy chicken.
     
    Last edited by mrdude, Jul 8, 2019
  16. DjoeN

    DjoeN Captain Haddock!

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    Somewhere in this potatoland!
    Kangaroo (Not my thing)
    Crocodille (Not my thing)
    Ostrich Steak (Just tastes like real steak, so Yummie)
     
  17. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Friend of mine was about 7 at the time and she went round her grandparent's house. Her grandma has kept rabbits as pets for decades.

    Barely through the back gate

    Nanny nanny nanny we got a rabbit.

    That's lovely dear. What are you going to call it?

    With the kind of innocence that only a child can pull off she wrinkled her face, in this scenario I am also imagining a head tilt too but I can't confirm that also happened.

    *Short pause*

    Dinner.

    Cue all the adults around, save for grandma, desperately trying to contain laughter.

    I would have said kangaroo more resembles beef steak. Ostrich is good too but if I am comparing to steak then it has to be kangaroo out of that list.
     
    Last edited by FAST6191, Jul 8, 2019
  18. DjoeN

    DjoeN Captain Haddock!

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    Somewhere in this potatoland!
    t was a Kangaroo burger and it tasted not bad, just not my thing
    The croc was horrible
     
  19. osaka35

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    alligator tail is about the oddest I suppose. But...i'm guessing snake, frog, squirrel, and deer are unusual to some? I eat those often enough. Deer mainly, which is tasty if made into deer burgers. I have been threatened with armadillo, pig's brains, and racoon before, but those are more old people food.
     
    Last edited by osaka35, Jul 8, 2019
  20. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Yeah deer is nice, indeed I had venison burgers this evening.

    "old people food"
    Don't think I have ever heard various meats phrased like that before. Around here it usually gets used more for things like stewed prunes and other things easier to digest or that get digest going (and stewed prunes certainly do that).

    Might have just been the burger -- if I had dismissed every pork or beef burger of dubious quality as the taste of the animal in question I would probably be a vegetarian. Whenever I have had kangaroo it has been something more resembling a steak and was quite nice.
     
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