[UPDATE] Epic Games buys out Rocket League studio, retracts previous statement on Steam availability

Discussion in 'GBAtemp & Scene News' started by Chary, May 1, 2019.

  1. nastys

    nastys ナースティス

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    Maybe it's another bluff of theirs to push Linux and Mac users to buy it now, before it gets "pulled."
     
    Last edited by nastys, May 2, 2019
  2. Silent_Gunner

    Silent_Gunner Mad Dog of Rambling and Insanity

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    Yeah, Psyonix did sound familiar. But that's like saying that Havok and Valve are intertwined: Half-Life 2, from what I remember, had physics that were based on Havok's physics engine or had an implementation of it or something along those lines. But it's not like Valve owns Havok; if I'm not mistaken, Dead Space also uses the Havok physics engine for Isaac's electric not-Gravity Gun.

    At this point, Unreal Tournament is a dead series. Not to say no one is playing those games, but the fact of the matter is, just because you have an IP that used to be the "shit" back in 1999/2000/Dial-Up era of online gaming doesn't mean, even with modern "updates," "features," and "virtual economies" that you'll still have enough strength to be relevant. Exhibit A: Medal of Honor after COD practically killed its relevance and they made those two games that were suddenly all about modern warfare in 2009/2010? Exhibit B: Quake Champions. Tries to be Overwatch, can't say I've heard of the game ever since they talked about the game in articles for promotion while it was in development.

    UT2004 being natively supported on Linux really isn't as big of a deal as you make it sound. When was that version of the game finalized? Does that version have parity feature and version-wise with the last update for the Windows version on DVD? (I wouldn't count GOG and Steam releases as those came years after those games were released, usually) And was that support from Epic itself or from the Open Source community? The reason Proton is such a big deal is because a lot of companies are naturally going with the status quo when it comes to making games for Windows: Microsoft has a console with an x86 processor running some variant of Windows 8/10, making it easy to port the instruction set over to PC, Xbox feature support most likely not included. They have a convenient API known as DirectX that almost every game uses primarily, with some support for maybe OGL or Vulkan later on down the road. With a lot of work already done for devs and publishers, all they have to do is develop the game for more than one proprietary set of hardware that is Windows-based and not have to worry about developing for other OSes unless they hire some third class porting company to port the game to Mac, let alone Linux.

    The fact of the matter is, if, to use a hypothetical, Ubuntu/Debian/Mint/whatever good and popular Linux distro out there had access to the same library of games, and they all ran pretty much the same, not to mention the same support for devices (*looks at my mostly wireless HTPC setup, complete with a Corsair Lapdog and a Logitech G906 mouse that I use on the blue moon that I'm playing an FPS*) I'd go with Linux in a heartbeat for so many reasons I could turn this already large wall of text into something that could get more than 10 feet taller! (tl;dr - Windows 10 not respecting my privacy, Windows' BT being bonkers as shit on whatever you use it with, not having to pay $100+ for Office, the ability to control even more aspects of the PC than I could with Windows, and also not having to pay $100+ for a legitimate and not-pirated Windows license and key that could be de-activated at any moment like the situation with sites like Green Man Gaming and its methods of distributing game keys)

    — Posts automatically merged - Please don't double post! —

    It's about getting the word out. It can be an effective warning for potential buyers, hence what @nastys said. Thing is, it could either drive people to buy the game, or drive them away from it depending on their opinion of Psyonix being bought by Epic Games, their fears about the game's future support and potential requirements of the Epic Game Store for online play on Steam like UPlay being required to play any Far Cry and/or Assassin's Creed game, and a consumer's desire to get something before it disappears off of a service. Think about it, people are still able to play that Scott Pilgrim vs. The World beat 'em up nowadays because people preserved the game when Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo (?) pulled it from their services because of expiring contracts and other nonsense that is part of the reason why physical copies were so desired for by collectors before the proliferation of PSN and Xbox LIVE the way they did in the 7th generation of consoles.
     
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  3. nastys

    nastys ナースティス

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    You can use LibreOffice con Windows, too.
     
  4. Silent_Gunner

    Silent_Gunner Mad Dog of Rambling and Insanity

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    Yeah, but good luck using some of those programs for various classes in college. For example, I took a Business Statistics class at community college a few years ago, and you had to use this plug-in that was only compatible with Excel itself for some calculations. OpenOffice (what I used at the time) didn't have a plug-in for that from what little research I did then.
     
  5. nastys

    nastys ナースティス

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    Never mind, I thought you wanted to run a free office suite on Windows.
    In your case you probably didn't have to pay for Microsoft Office anyway, since most colleges and universities provide free licenses to their students.
     
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  6. Pipistrele

    Pipistrele GBAtemp Regular

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    As much as I may agree with good intentions and disappointment that's driving the whole "review bombing" trend, the tactic itself always struck me as a collective temper tantrum at best and actively damaging to the games at worst. Like, in this particular instance, bombing Rocket League mostly comes from desire to voice concerns about Rocket League's future and protect the game from potential marketing/monetization screwery - but all it actually achieves is scaring off potential new players, who will see low score and decide to pass on the game because it "probably declined" or something. Irony of the situation is that in a way it actually benefits Epic Games to have their newly obtained IP having ruined scores on competitor's marketplace, since that kinda opens the window for hindering Steam updates of the game and pushing the narrative of "reviews are bad there because the game just isn't good on Steam, try Epic Store version".
    The whole Borderlands 1/2 review-bombing thing is an another good example - both games don't even have anything to do with BL3, Epic Store or Gearbox' modern business practices, so all the bombing is both effectively useless and also ruins reputation of genuinely good games.

    Speaking shortly, I just think there are a lot of better and more constructive ways to make noise - from poking all the pundits and reviewers to sharing the word on Reddit threads/AMAs. I can understand review bombing when game in question is objectively bad due to crappy business practices; but when it comes at expense of good titles, it's just not a good thing for me.
     
    Last edited by Pipistrele, May 2, 2019
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  7. reddragon105

    reddragon105 GBAtemp Regular

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    Yeah, I'm honestly surprised that the team wasn't made part of Epic back when they were working on UT2004 - it would have made sense to bring a talented group of people like that in-house instead of effectively outsourcing a large chunk of your game. But, yes, it does go a long way to explaining what made UT2004 so good. Man, I played so much of that game...

    But while I'm kind of happy to see Psyonix and Epic finally tie the knot, I'm really not a fan of Epic's aggressive approach to drive people towards their store. Rocket League is already on Steam, so why not just leave it on Steam and also add it to the Epic Store so that people can buy it wherever they want? Removing it from Steam is anti-consumerist because it takes away an option of where to buy the game from.

    You're right that anyone who cares about Rocket League will have already bought it - and anyone who wants it on Steam still has until 'late 2019' to buy it on Steam, which gives them plenty of time - and it will probably be on sale at least once before them. The lack of Linux support on the Epic Game Store is an issue, but again anyone who wants the game for Linux has time to buy it on Steam - and who knows, maybe Linux support is something that Epic is planning and will have implemented before they add Rocket League to their store. After all, it's going to be the same version of the game, so the game will already have Linux support, they just need to make a Linux launcher.
     
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  8. leon315

    leon315 POWERLIFTER

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    they spent 10 or perhaps hundreds of million dollars to buy the studio, i'm sure they has all the rights to to so...
    plus who already own the game on STEAM still the access of download and everything else, it's NOT entirely a bad things since now they can bring more NEW audience and make that game even more popular :P
     
  9. linuxares

    linuxares I'm not a generous god!

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    New audience is a pretty bad example since it's probably going to be shown less. Linux users for example can kiss this game bye bye.
     
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  10. Oschara

    Oschara GBAtemp Regular

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    so glad i dont game on pc. sorry to everyone effected by it.
     
  11. leon315

    leon315 POWERLIFTER

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    HOW DID YOU KNOW MATE? the entire users base on fortnuts are NEW and different from the common STEAM ones, i don't think you can predict the future. Linux is just small base, it's entirely not that significant, and even the game is now an EPIC exclusive, doesn't mean Linux version will be cancelled.

    Personally i think make it available on more platforms will certainly brings more attentions, it's a good thing if a game can gain more user base, which means more popularity. just look at Minecraft.
     
    Last edited by leon315, May 2, 2019
  12. eyeliner

    eyeliner Has an itch needing to be scratched.

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    Steam having competition is always good. Or did you enjoy buying a physical game, only to have a steam key on the inside to install Steam and play through the client after instaling the game?

    Congrats to Epic.

    I hope to see this more often. Them having retracted their position is meh. I want to see more initiatives like these for new games instead.
     
    Last edited by eyeliner, May 2, 2019
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  13. p0rnstorm21

    p0rnstorm21 Newbie

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    Really? do you think so ?
     
  14. chaoskagami

    chaoskagami G̷̘̫̍̈́̊̓̈l̴̙͔̞͠i̵̳͊ţ̸̙͇͒̓c̵̬̪̯̥̳͒͌̚h̵̹̭͛̒̊̽̚

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    ↑↑↓↓←→←→BA
    Q: How many EPIC employees does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

    A: All of them, they need to find the lightbulb first. It sure as hell ain't in their office.

    Competetition is good, but this is more in the "anti-consumer practices" category, methinks.
     
  15. Memoir

    Memoir Hi, I'm Cynical!

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    In the Murderbox!
    You're perfectly content with them essentially shitting on consumers out of spite for steam? First Metro, and now this? This is okay? If they chose to invest (not drop a bag of cash on a dev/publishers desk for exclusivity) on new prospects? Great. Do it the right way. Quit being shady and earn respect.
     
    Last edited by Memoir, May 2, 2019
  16. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Re: "30% is fair/standard"

    As was mentioned just because something is out there in the world and is the baseline or tradition does not mean it is fair.

    "for all the features"
    What would those be? Assuming I even care then I will take cheaper games if all I have to do is point my [insert web file storage/"cloud storage" service of choice] at the game saves directory. Even then if my calculations with Nintendo's save backup things were anything to go by ( https://gbatemp.net/threads/nintend...after-cancellation.519223/page-3#post-8304831 ) then to do it here would be a rounding error compared to some of the sums already seen.
    Similarly I bet dropbox or whatever would cream their jeans at a chance to have a potentially up and coming game service tied to them. Obviously they would call it a partnership but eh.
    Communities and reviews then.
    Fortunately these existed before then. I am sure if it really mattered they could crowbar some kind of blog/forum/shop software into it to do something.
    The reviews thing. Some made a big deal of this and pondered its anti consumer nature. From the perspective of a casual buyer of games then sure. Anybody can still quite easily tap the game name and review into a search engine though, and given the state of most user review sections it is probably a good bet to be doing that anyway. To that end meh.

    Speaking of calculations I am not falling asleep in my chair any more.

    Game distribution services are a CDN with an account lookup (a trivial thing really) and money transaction layer. If you are dealing with millions the percentages for a credit card vendor get very small. Not nothing but less than 5% (5% is about low volume transaction for a local business with a card reader). Transaction volume is mostly going to be slightly lower but with predominantly higher value transactions too (not like people are buying $1 cables with free shipping like I do a lot on Amazon or whatever).
    Said CDN is not even that much of a hammered one. Ignoring saves then baseline storage is not that much -- 50 gigs a game maybe (some less, some more) which is nothing when the service is maybe going to host a few thousand games in the first few years. Download count is going to trend towards 1 per transaction (between those that never download it or download it the once and barely play it/keep playing it until they bore or their machine breaks in a few years you are going to get the bulk of things -- performance users will be a notable class in the design but probably nothing to disrupt things too much). Latency and slight drops is nothing drastic either here as it is bulk download rather than time sensitive stuff.

    It is a reasonable amount of bandwidth compared to say a picture storage or office file storage setup. It would similarly probably want you to get the unmetered connections in, possibly temporarily unlock some for bigger releases or do the preload thing (why do you think Steam has that?), or have a tiered system so the 5 year old sports game you technically sell is not there taking up the same as the hot new release.

    If Epic are then willing to run it at minimal profit, breakeven or even write it off as advertising/service growth then I would say 30% is way more than is necessary for that. 14% might even be higher than they could get away with.
     
  17. Shadowfied

    Shadowfied GBAtemp Addict

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    This isn't entirely the point. Epic is however using this as their talking point, while they still allow, for example, Gearbox, selling Borderlands 3 on GMG which has the same split as Steam. They pretend it's all about Steam being unfair with their revenue split, while ignoring, and allowing everything else with the same split. It's all about them, but they are trying to make themselves look like the good guys.

    It's an attack on Steam and nothing else.
     
  18. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    Even assuming it is then is that a bad thing?
     
  19. Shadowfied

    Shadowfied GBAtemp Addict

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    They proved they don't actually give a fuck about their only argument, that being the revenue split. I haven't heard what else they are gonna bring to the table. I can't see anything positive coming out of it though. So yes, absolutely.
     
  20. leon315

    leon315 POWERLIFTER

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    no dude, it's like this dish is that restaurant's speciality, and you can only find in this specific place from this specific chief, it happens in ur every days life, when u kids became so concern about things from ur daily life?

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    I dont like BR and i don't play Fortnuts, but when a 3 or 4 year old game(?) receives a huge support from another company, why not? the family will become even larger, now Console user can play against switch, pc steam, now EPIC users.
     
    Last edited by leon315, May 2, 2019
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