Hardware This tiny nano-glass disc could store the knowledge of humanity in 5D for billions of years

KHEOPS

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https://mobile.twitter.com/unisouth...87594.ampproject.net/1535566825959/frame.html


Wow! I'll soon be able to die and rest in peace, I'll finally be able to archive all the roms and video game history.

Maxisciences

An incredible 5D hard drive capable of storing data for billions of years
EMMANUEL PERRIN
February 18, 2016 at 17:27


A 5D hard disk in the form of a nanostructured quartz was developed by researchers at the University of Southampton. They claim that their system is capable of storing considerable amounts of data for billions of years.

A team of scientists at the University of Southampton in Britain is revolutionizing data storage systems completely. His project, conducted within the Optoelectronics Research Center, has resulted in the development of a hard disk that can stand the test of time.

According to its inventors, the device could last 13.8 billion years. An incredible technological performance that could solve a number of problems currently related to file storage devices, not viable in time.

The new generation hard disk comes in the form of a nanostructured quartz the size of a coin. Its secret in terms of resistance lies in an innovative method of writing and reading in 5 dimensions (5D). The latter theorized in 2013 has now become a reality.

It consists in burning the disc in a similar way to that of a classic CD. At the latter, the data transferred for storage is written by an engraving laser on one side.

2D Reading vs. 5D Reading

The data are then presented in the form of a binary system composed of a succession of 1 and 0 represented by plates and hollows. During playback, a light beam travels through the suite and interprets it to retranscribe the files. This is called two-dimensional writing and reading.

On the new disk, on the other hand, the information is encoded in 5 dimensions using self-assembled nanostructures in quartz fused by ultrafast lasers. The reading is then done with an optical microscope and a polarizer.

During this phase, five types of information are transcribed by the orientation of the nanostructures, their position, or the reflected light intensity. The result is a much more complex language.

More storage for more resistance

The advantage of this system is twofold: not only it can store much more data (up to 350 terabytes, or 350,000 billion bytes, according to researchers), but it also frees itself from CD vulnerability problems.

With this new technology, data is no longer recorded on the surface but inside the glass disc. The structure thus protects them from a number of environmental factors, making their long-term preservation possible. According to the researchers, the 5D disc would present a thermal stability at more than 1.000°C.

In other words, the device is extremely resistant. It has already been tested to record important documents such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Isaac Newton's Optical Treaty and the King James Bible.

"The last proof of our civilization"

According to the scientists behind the project, this new storage method could considerably improve archiving methods. From now on, the latter hope soon to arrive at a marketable version.

Peter Kazan, one of the team members explains: "It is incredible to think that we have created technology that can preserve documents and information and store them in space for future generations. He concludes: "This technology can ensure the last proof of our civilization: all that we have learned will not be forgotten."
 

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comput3rus3r

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Can someone please explain to me how data can be archived in "self-assembled, 5 dimensions"? Because unless it's punching a hole through the space-time continuum I'm fairly certain that 3 dimensions is kinda the limitation so far
lol on top of that how can they prove the claim that it will last 13 billion years?
 

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Yes.. Ah! Ah .mmmh ok...
It is said that when no man is in a forest, when a tree falls it makes no noise...can it be proven? No, but I know deep down that I don't.
 

comput3rus3r

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Yes.. Ah! Ah .mmmh ok...
It is said that when no man is in a forest, when a tree falls it makes no noise...can it be proven? No, but I know deep down that I don't.
that's an overused and un-intuitive saying. It's obvious that if you're not testing something then you can't prove something. Proving requires that you actually do experiments. With that said you can indeed prove the tree makes a noise by putting cameras and microphones in the forest. Saying something is going to last 13 billion years is ridiculous. Give it to me and I guarantee I can break it in less than a minute.
 
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KHEOPS

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putting cameras and microphones?
By who? By man so the tree will make noise with the microphone...
Yes math and statistics are like that ,it seems impossible on a large scale but...
A steel bar that lasts 100 years
Do I really need to test 100 years? Or I prefer interpolated data over 1 or 10 years looked at the state of the steel, its porosity and interpolated ca X10 = 100 years
But I'm on your side, but don't deny the progress compared to our hdd,or ssd,or sdcard,cd,dvd,we know it doesn't even last a lifetime.
 
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Pleng

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I'm confused... The introduction refers to it as a hard disc, but the rest of the article seems to be talking about an optical disc. Which is it?
 

FAST6191

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On the matter of dimensions the following video works, assuming it does not do the mental equivalent of BSOD

lol on top of that how can they prove the claim that it will last 13 billion years?
I will have to look at the maths they used to see more but generally speaking the decay methods for most storage is reasonably well understood. Thermal events, radioactive decay, quantum events (more commonly seen in processor design today with things like quantum tunnelling) but still a problem, chemical degradation ( http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-dinosaur-dna-amber-01383.html , or less depressing see burned CD lifetimes), all the fun and games entropy tends to cause, radiation from the universe (cosmic rays messing with RAM is seen often enough).... If everything else is accounted for and it is ultimately just a very stable crystal you fire some non ionising light into so as to read then expected lifetimes do shoot way up there and you can start looking at radioactive decay.
 

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