The benefits of Brexit - the future of the United Kingdom

Discussion in 'World News, Current Events & Politics' started by emigre, May 26, 2018.

  1. Pleng

    Pleng Custom Title

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    And nobody in the leave campaign, of course, had financial interest in the result? Hell the campaign was led by somebody who didn't even believe in the cause but just wanted to get one over on Cameron...

    I think you're right; we won't be much worse off than we are no; we'll continue to be as poorly off as we have been since the vote. Things will probably get a bit better when we inevitably end up with the Norway model and are as good as in the EU, just without actually having a voice.
     
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  2. fatherjack

    fatherjack GBAtemp Fan

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    You're talking about politicians rather than the issue there, does anybody really trust any of them to do the right thing?


    I would welcome some posts from our Norwegian members to let us know just how 'shitty' that's proving - got a be honest, no press coverage in UK lately on how bad they are suffering?
     
    Last edited by fatherjack, Sep 22, 2018
  3. KingVamp

    KingVamp Haaah-hahahaha!

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    I haven't be following this as much as I should, so I wouldn't know, but it seems to not be that beneficial base on this thread so far.

    I find it funny that meanwhile, we may become 51 States "soon".
     
  4. FamousBug_

    FamousBug_ Advanced Member

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    Us brits wont need to follow articles 11 and 13.
     
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  5. Jokey_Carrot

    Jokey_Carrot professional retard

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    STRONG AND STABLE BREXIT MEANS BREXIT[​IMG]
     
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  6. Pleng

    Pleng Custom Title

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    I have no idea how it's working out for them, but it's not really relevant. The only options are the Norway model or no deal at all. They've only ever been the options despite all this talk of "negotiations". And as no government would be wreckless enough to go with no deal, the Norway model it will be. It'll be sold up as some kind of compromise to give us time to work things out in the long term and then as the economy starts to pick up it'll slowly be forgotten about and this whole thing will have been a waste of time serving only to make a lot of people poorer and a few people richer, and to have failed to give Borris his "go" at running the country for a while.
     
  7. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    Erm...I'm a bit confused by the "us". Is your selected country incorrect, or do you think there are negative brexit consequences outside Brittain? :unsure:

    (and off-topic: I get pretty annoyed that people refer to the EU as "Brussels". Yes, the EU headquarters are there, but it implies that it's just that city - or even those specific buildings - who want a specific course of action. You don't refer to actions by the US government as "Washington DC says...", do you?)

    Sorry, but I disagree. More so: I even think you don't believe that yourself.

    Here's the thing: mere DAYS after the referendum, Nigel Farage quit his job, somehow confident that others would follow the plan he had in his head(1). Since then there have been more shifts and discussions than a Shakespearean drama. I gotta respect May for staying the course (okay: "a course") for so long, but the nicest description of her government would be that there are disagreements. It sort of polarizes between a "no deal brexit" and a "soft brexit" now, but that's not taking into account that hardly anyone of the bremainders has changed their views.

    That in itself is enough to warrant validity to this concern (honestly: how many governments did Y2K threaten to topple, really? You know the answer: NONE!). But I haven't even talked about the actual concerns:

    * the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. Here's a challenge for the brexiteers among you: GET A FREAKING SOLUTION ON THIS!!! The whole "just get on with it" implies that is a minor deal that will solve itself. That won't happen. It just won't. The government can't agree on what to do with it, but at least they're recognizing that they're effectively bordering the EU there.

    * Brittain would like to separate the free movement of persons from the free movement of goods. For the EU, that always was out of the question. Maybe it's because I follow the news a bit longer, maybe British news papers don't deliver quality, but this wasn't new to me. Nonetheless, the last couple of days/weeks, May acts as if the EU pulls this shit out of their ass on a whim. The way I see it (and I guess every European but Brittain) is that this is just picking cherries. Basically, Brittain wants the benefits of getting all the goods, while limiting/blocking the current refugee situation.
    ...but for some reason, WE are the ones "not paying Brittain respect" when we laugh that kind of nonsense out of the room ("hey, honey: I want to separate from you. BTW: I call dibs on little Alice, the new kitchen and the mustang; you can have the leaking cellar, the ruined garage, our whining brat of a boy and the garden shed. In case you refuse, I'll play the "lack of respect" card and claim these things regardless" :P)

    * yes, the EU costs a lot of money. I get brexiteers in that regards: you pay money that is used (I assume) mostly elsewhere and get back limitations in how to run things. It's almost as if you're a resident in any given country! The thing is: that "mostly elsewhere" means that there is a small part that is used...well...within. These investments are made with European money, so they belong to the EU. Obviously, we can't just lift those things out of the country, so even for a no deal, you still need a deal to work things out on that. Again: I've yet to hear the first brexiteer acknowledge that fact, let alone work out a solution everyone can agree with.






    (1): that is, of course, assuming he has an actual, factual plan.
     
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  8. DragorianSword

    DragorianSword GBAtemp's #1 Gunter

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    I agree with @Taleweaver.
    I'm not always a big fan of the EU, mainly because of their, sometimes lacking, efficiency, but there are a lot of benefits to it too.
    For example, if Greece would not have been a member of the EU, they would have been so much worse of.
    They probably would have found another way to lend money, but with higher interest rates. Plus the EU forced (and helped them) to take measures to try prevent a repeat of the same situation.

    I agree that the whole refugee situation could and should be handled way better by the EU though.
    The members are comprised of left wing politicians for the most part and they want to help the refugees (which I agree with), but they have no concrete plan how to do it, so they just let the countries themselves flail around with it.

    So on topic:
    The only real benefit the UK will have is control over it's immigration policy, but since the trading policies are part of the EU they will have no right to these (which is logical).
    Life will probably get quite a bit more expensive because of this and it will take quite some time to make that drop.
     
  9. brickmii82

    brickmii82 GBAtemp Maniac

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    I'm gonna be flat out honest here. I think it's actually a great thing that you've chosen to leave the EU. The more I learn about it as an organization the less Im fond of it. It's like a bunch of countries faking friendliness in the interest of playing nice to create an aristocracy. It's a big ass political circle jerk. The UK will be fine. She's a tough lass and been around the block a time or two.
     
  10. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    A bit of a bump here.

    May is still struggling to find agreement with the EU, but it's getting less and less likely to happen. Apparently, EU governments gave in to a lot of Cameron's demands just before the brexit. Cameron was sure that this would be rewarded by his citizens...but then the majority voted brexit nonetheless. Of course they haven't forgotten that, so of course they're not cutting May some slack. Besides: not to be cynic, but what's really the point of working something out if May might not make deals on behalf of her government? :unsure:

    What's also fascinating is that at this point, EVERYONE seems to be a loser. The bremainers want to remain in the EU and the brexiteers (Boris Johnson) think it doesn't go far enough. May is damned if she can make a deal and damned if she can't. And the EU...hmm...from what I've read, I feel like this should be a blessing: Brittain has (apparently) always dealed themselves in exceptions and benefits over the other countries, or blocked other proposals for personal gains rather than the common good. If true, I certainly don't mind letting them go (ahem...no offense, but this current bickering seems to illustrate that to be true). But even then: in physical terms, the island isn't going anywhere. I remember the way customs used to be, and it seems like that's coming back with interest. Frankly: I don't think scenes like Children of Men(2) are that unlikely anymore. And the tariffs on both sides will be an income on both sides that will need to be spend on customs (3). So in these regions (both sides of the sea), many things will get more expensive.

    ...and to get back at that fascinating thing: why hasn't there been a second referendum yet? It honestly seems like the correct thing to do: the initial vote was too close to make drastic measurements like this. Are the hardline brexiteers REALLY SURE they're representing the majority on their dreams? Likewise...a record number of Brits just emigrated the fuck out of there. If that exodus continues, in the end all you really have left are the hardcore brexiteers.
    (note: I wouldn't bring up these points if the outcome was above, say two thirds one one side and one third on another. But this whole 48-52 deal is basically nothing).



    (1): again: so I've been lead to believe. I've never worked for the EU myself, so I can't attest to that.
    (2): the scene where they're entering the harbor. For those who have not yet seen it: SEE IT! It's one of the best dystopian sci-fi movies of recent years
    (3): in a semi-unrelated piece of news: the customs of our largest airport are threatening to strike. They get extra personnel, but it won't even be enough to properly maintain a soft brexit, let alone a "no deal" one (they demand 300 extra man force).
     
  11. MisterPantsEyes

    MisterPantsEyes GBAtemp Fan

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    So can we all agree that Britian will become a third world country after they leave?

    I should feel sorry for them, but it's just hilarious to me.
     
  12. leon315

    leon315 POWERLIFTER

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    there's one actually:

    Brits can now built a Great Wall to keep incoming muslim and afro refugees out from UK borders, to keep British safe from ISIS's menaces.
     
  13. JoeBloggs777

    JoeBloggs777 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    we don't need a wall, were an Island. it kept Hitler from invading.

    also we can control who comes to the UK. I've nothing against Polish people but it's crazy to have un-controlled Immigration, 1 Million Poles came to live and work in the UK.
     
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  14. kumikochan

    kumikochan GBAtemp Psycho!

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    I'm guessing you never heard of operation sea lion. Hiter had a plan already set in motion where the UK would come under Nazi rule but thanks to France falling he didn't have the means anymore since he had to focus the fight on different fronts. UK being an island wasn't going to keep the Nazi's away if France didn't fall. You also seem to forget about 1915 when German Zeppelins were bombing the UK and was also meant to transport troops to the mainland after anti aircraft guns were taken out
     
  15. Song of storms

    Song of storms GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    The country is full of illegals that do criminal stuff and the news is often hidden to cover the narrative of the left. If you drive a scooter in London you are risking to be scooter-jacked in broad light, as if it was Rio or something.
     
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  16. FAST6191

    FAST6191 Techromancer

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    I would take a rather different interpretation of that one, somewhat more in line with this


    As for the topic at hand I already went last time and not a lot has changed -- still blind leading the blind.
     
  17. Taleweaver

    Taleweaver Storywriter

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    I think @leon315 is talking about your Ireland border. That "no deal" scenario probably ends up with you building a wall on that side to fend off those pesky EU citizens. ;)
    Digging a canal would probably work as well if you insist on islands being safer, but I suspect that being a tad more costly.

    I agree, but probably not in the sense that you mean. From when I visited England (years ago, now), I found the news to be pretty much hidden underneath a large pile of rubbish tabloids.
     
    Last edited by Taleweaver, Oct 18, 2018 - Reason: EDIT: mentioned the wrong person (sorry)
  18. matthi321

    matthi321 GBAtemp Fan

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    when uk leaves europe will i then have to risk paying custom if i buy somethig in uk from europe?
     
  19. kumikochan

    kumikochan GBAtemp Psycho!

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    Yeah the union already said that everything that comes from the Union will get taxed like other nations outside of the union (no exeptions ) that get stuff shipped from the Union. The brexit deal needs to happen soon since the deadline is soon and the UK still hasn't gotten any deals ready whatsoever so it's likely (90 percent sure ) gonna be a hard brexit where there are only disadvantages and a collapse in many ways including economical since prices of food, clothing well everything will skyrocket for people living in the UK. Driving licenses don't work in the EU anymore, shipping out vegetables and fruits from farmers won't happen anymore since they would loose 2 much money doing so because of tarrifs. A shortage of medicine since the biggest suppliers of medicine in Europe reside in the Union. House prices could plummet by a third over three years and that homeowners could be left with negative equity and spiralling mortgage rates. And so much more
     
    Last edited by kumikochan, Oct 18, 2018
  20. SG854

    SG854 If It Bleeds, We Can Kill It

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    You’re talking about the wrong Leon
     
    Last edited by SG854, Oct 18, 2018
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