Soldering Question

Discussion in 'Wii - Hacking' started by BananaXX, May 18, 2007.

  1. BananaXX
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    BananaXX Member

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    Hey guys,

    I'm a bit of a soldering noob, but I've decided to try to practice a bit and then attempt to install my own WiiKey. I've read a lot about it around here, and everyones advice is great. I'm left with one question though:

    I've read about people lifting the pads from the board. How exactly would one do this? i.e. How do I avoid doing this?
     
  2. Hooya

    Hooya GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    I assume that people do this by overheating the points on the board and therefore loosening the connection between the copper pad and the plastic the board is made out of.

    Avoid this by using good soldering practices: the solder should melt almost instantly when the iron touches it. If it doesn't something is wrong. Holding an iron on the point for 10 seconds is a quick way to destroy electronic components, and in no way does it help melting of solder.

    For the points on the Wii (especially the smaller points) I usually only make contact with the board for less than one second to tin the points, and again less than one second to attach the wires.
     
  3. darrrren

    darrrren Member

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    the pads are glued to the board and heat weakens the bond.it is pretty hard to lift a pad unless you pull or try to bend a wire attached to it.
     
  4. BananaXX
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    BananaXX Member

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    Cool. Thanks for the advice guys.
     
  5. turboge

    turboge Newbie

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    I found that making a small mound solder on each point and then reheat the solder and attach the wire to it. Be sure to use flux. I dipped each wire in flux before attaching it to the point. be sure not to strip much insulation off the wire (could cause short in the future). It doesn't take much wire at all to connect it to the board. Tug your wires in moderation to insure you have a good connection.

    Hope that helps.

    Turbogé [​IMG]
     
  6. imgod22222

    imgod22222 GBAtemp's Original No-faced Member

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    I've pulled off pads before. The easiest way to do it is to use desoldering braid, and forcefully pulling it off. The easiest way to avoid that is to make sure the solder and desoldering braid are both warm so they separate easily.
     
  7. bliss-chris

    bliss-chris Member

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    You may not want to use desoldering braid at all. A desoldering pump is way better, faster and softer to the soldering points anyways.
     
  8. BananaXX
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    BananaXX Member

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    I hadn't thought of using a desoldering pump. Perhaps I'll stay away from the desoldering braid. How much should a desoldering pump cost?
     
  9. imgod22222

    imgod22222 GBAtemp's Original No-faced Member

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    cost me 7 bux. I find it hard to use though, because i cant hold a wire, a desoldering pump, and a solering iron at the same time.
     
  10. Hooya

    Hooya GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    Don't hold the wire, you shouldn't have to with a pump. If you suck enough solder from the area you should be able to just tap the point with your iron and remove the wire. That is, if you didn't remove the wire with the sucking action of the pump (god that sounds dirty...)
     
  11. corbs132

    corbs132 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    i lifted mine trying to bend wires attached.
     
  12. bliss-chris

    bliss-chris Member

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    @BananaXX: I've seen pumps between 1,45€ and 10€. But I think the cheap ones are for one time usage only. [​IMG]

    @Hooya: That's a good way of removing a wire!

    @Hooya and BananaXX: It's a problem with soldering in general: a third hand would often times be extraordinarily helpful. There were countless fiddly situations where I cursed God and would've given my left arm for a third hand! Ey, wait.... [​IMG]
     
  13. Hooya

    Hooya GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    Ah yes, the ever so wished for third hand. Wouldn't it be nice to hold the wire with your left hand, the iron in your right hand and the solder wick in your ... middle? ... hand?

    This can be very helpful:

    link

    And in relation to your soldering pump question, I use this:
    link
    And it's not just for one use. The tip is made of plastic and eventually will melt/wear away, but it's easy and pretty cheap to replace the tip (it even comes with a replacement tip). So far I haven't needed to replace that tip yet, although the best option is to not need to desolder in the first place! It has seen it's fair share of use though.
     
  14. bliss-chris

    bliss-chris Member

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    The funny thing is, that in German this thing actually is called "The Third Hand". [​IMG] And all the other good uses where a third hand would come in handy. Even without a third arm or just a third forearm. Where's genetical engineering when you need some? [​IMG]

    And yes, the vacuum desoldering pump seems to be a good one. These plastic tips usually are very sturdy and heat resistant. It's still better to have a plastic tip, because you can't destroy chips with it through static electricity. Metal tips surely last longer, but it's more of a risk for the circuits.
     
  15. lenselijer

    lenselijer GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    First thing you do is put some solder on the wiikey chip points.
    Also notice there is very little solder on the wii motherboard pads when it comes from the factory, so first thing i do is put some extra solder on all the 6 pads.
    When you take the iron away the points will become little spikes of solder.
    Now put the wiikey in place with a small piece of tape.
    Solder the 2 big solder points and then remove the tape.
    The wiikey cannot move anymore now.

    Only thing left is the 4 small points, but because you already put solder on them they already reach to the level of the chip, so its only a small bit of extra solder to connect them.
    This is how i did 25 wii consoles and all are still working fine.