Simulate a Wii mote with an android phone or similar possible?

Discussion in 'Wii U - Console, Accessories and Hardware' started by someonetimeuser, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. someonetimeuser
    OP

    someonetimeuser Member

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    hi,

    I have 3 controllers for my wii u (wiiupro controller, a wiimote, wii u gamepad), but what to have one more so I can get some challenges unlocked on smash 4. Is there a way to simulate a wiimote with other hardware?
     
  2. shinkodachi

    shinkodachi On permanent leave

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    AFAIK such an app doesn't exist. Surely a second hand regular Wiimote would do the trick? If you look around it's like $5.
     
  3. DebugErr

    DebugErr Member

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    Such an app would be highly interesting as smartphones also have acceleration / orientation sensors.
     
  4. shinkodachi

    shinkodachi On permanent leave

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    Not entirely following that logic, unless you mean homebrew could use additional sensors present in smartphones?

    Such an app would just be reading the sensors of the smartphone and translating them on the fly to mimic the data of the Wiimote sensors. This is very possible, but you'd have to deal with the latency that is added due to the "translation" happening in between. So not only would it be inconvenient to use a smartphone as a Wiimote since you'd just have all buttons virtually on the touch screen, but also this makeshift Andromote would have considerable input lag making it very difficult to use for any real purpose.

    Not to mention you'd need a smartphone with an IR transmitter if you wanted the whole deal, effectively ruling out most Android devices out there.
     
  5. DebugErr

    DebugErr Member

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    of course it would be just a replacement. good enough for mario party or such though. afaik, from my programming with sensors, retrieving their data is pretty fast, and translating them to wiimote sensors shouldn't be a big deal too; there's a noticable input lag but not thaaat bad.
    using the present hardware buttons on a phone could at least yield a useful B button for a volume button at the side.
     
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  6. julialy

    julialy Homebrewer

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    maybe mario kart 8 replayer, so you can cheat on the records?
     
  7. chevowner

    chevowner Advanced Member

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    Wrong way around. The Wii Remote receives IR from the "sensor" bar, and most android cameras can see IR.
     
  8. DebugErr

    DebugErr Member

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    You don't need IR because most smartphones have a pretty exact gyroscope; you could just calibrate your phone to a center position and edge position and then move it around in the room.
     
  9. _v3

    _v3 GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Is someone seriously considering making this?? Cuz it would be freakin' awesome!!! AFAIK Wiimotes use bluetooth so that shouldn't be too hard to do, you would probbably need to name the device just like a wiimote (NINTENDO-RVT-CNT-01). This would be really awesome.
     
  10. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    Wii remote uses a combination of IR tracking and gyroscope. Just gyroscope alone won't cut it.
     
  11. DebugErr

    DebugErr Member

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    I see, I dunno exactly how and why, but I bet this position could be made with a gyroscope alone if it's good enough, and additional calibration... gonna try that when I'm back from the holidays in a test app for calibrating a phone to a rectangle in the room.