Should you be born in a country for it to be your nationality?

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by soulx, Jun 23, 2010.

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Should you be born in a country for it to be your nationality?

  1. Yes [Damn you, immigrants]

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  2. No...

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  1. soulx
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    Member soulx GBAtemp Legend

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    Do you think you should be born in Canada (or any other country) for it to be considered your nationality? Do note that I'm not going by the textbook definition of nationality.
     


  2. anaxs

    Member anaxs got milk, got candy

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    yep, i agree
     
  3. giratina16

    Member giratina16 Born This Way

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    I agree. If you're not born in that country then it's not where you ORIGINATE from. A piece of card can say you are a whatever citizen but you'll always be form somewhere else. (I wasn't aiming that at anyone in particular).
     
  4. sputnix

    Member sputnix GBAtemp Fan

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    I really don't see the point of this but anyways I agree I'm canadain [even though the flag is amierican I screwed up when I registered and don't know how to change it [​IMG]]
     
  5. syko5150

    Member syko5150 GBAtemp Syko!

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    No i don't however i think you need to earn the right to live somewhere and also need to be living there for a certain amount of time before you can claim that you're whatever country it is.I don't think you can move to a country get your citizenship and be like now I'm one of them after a short period of time. America is a good example here there's a lot of people from countries all around the world that now call themselves Americans there will always be people who accept them as Americans and those who don't. Either way its not really a big deal if someone wants to think of themselves as whatever
     
  6. soulx
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    Member soulx GBAtemp Legend

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    Select 'My Controls' in the upper right corner and at the left, click 'Edit Profile Info'.
     
  7. Danny600kill

    Member Danny600kill xD

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    I think your nationality should never change, but I agree with citizenship. Even If i moved to another country, Canada for example and got my Citizenship If i was asked Id still say my nationality was British, but then add that I'm a Canadian Citizen
     
  8. _Chaz_

    Member _Chaz_ GBAtemp's Official Mook™

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    I think not.

    If you're raised in a country, follow its rules and regulations, and its customs are your customs, than that should be your Nationality.
     
  9. frogmyster3

    Member frogmyster3 GBAtemp Regular

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    Well my cousin was born in England but has spent most of his life (so far) in Ireland and recently moved back. While technically he is English as that is where he was born and where he currently resides as well as his dad being English, we still refer to him as Irish. Although that's because him mum is. So he's English and Irish.

    But if someone was in another country while pregnant for an extended period, they could give birth in that country and then return home. So while that child will live and grow up in his parent's country of origin, if the question was instead a statement, then that child would have a different nationality from their friends and family despite possibly only ever being in that country once.

    So my answer to the question is - it depends on the circumstances.
     
  10. sfunk

    Member sfunk GBAtemp Regular

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    So in your opinion nationality changes within a generation? If your African friend has some kids are those kids are somehow inherently more Canadian then their father? I disagree. Being Canadian has a lot more to do with what you do and how you think then it has to do with birth. Nationality is clearly a nebulous/ill defnied concept considering all borders are political in nature thus identifying with a country based on birth location is non-sensical. What's more important is whether you are capable of identifying with the central tenets/ideologies that define your country. In Canada that would be ideas like the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the concept of the cultural mosaic. If you hold an honest belief in those things then that, to me, is far more important than where you were born. That being said I have no particular problems with our current citizenship requirements (3 years in the country, capable of speaking English or French and a test on the "rights and responsibilities of citizenship" and an "understanding of Canada’s history, values, institutions and symbols"). Source
     
  11. soulx
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    Member soulx GBAtemp Legend

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    Marriages of convenience may not be allowed under Canada’s immigration law but are commonly done. Somebody marries this guy/women from another country. The guy/woman doesn't actually love them and just did it to get a Canadian citizenship.

    Have you seen the W5 documentary? Sometimes, the language translator workers help them in this illegal process. That's the fault of Canada's enforcement of those workers. Internal goverment paper says that 25% of the applications are fraud. Canada's citizenship rules are too lenient. Citizen and Immigration Canada and Canada Border Services Agency don't bother investigating complants about this which is absurd since they should be deported for marriage fraud.
     
  12. Overlord Nadrian

    Banned Overlord Nadrian Banned

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    I fully agree with this. Nationality should always remain the same as when you were born, no matter where you are at any time. There is no point in calling yourself American when you were born in, let's say, India. People will always say "Oh, it's the Indian guy" (no jokes intended), so why not just go with the flow and call yourself Indian too? You ARE the one who was born in India, after all.
     
  13. Magmorph

    Member Magmorph GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Why does it matter to you why people are getting married? Love is not something that can be proven.
     
  14. soulx
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    The other person considers themselves victimized by the person. The person intentionally abandons their so-called "spouse" to live a life alone already married to some other person in some other country.
    This has to do with false "love". Misleading the person to get a Canadian citizenship. This is a punishable act by Canadian law yet it is rarely enforced.
     
  15. DeltaBurnt

    Member DeltaBurnt I'm bored

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    Saying yes is like saying you have to love Nintendo if you started with a Gameboy.
     
  16. _Chaz_

    Member _Chaz_ GBAtemp's Official Mook™

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    Wait, you mean that's not true?
     
  17. sfunk

    Member sfunk GBAtemp Regular

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    I completely agree with you on this but problems with enforcement have little to do with the the requirements themselves. I think the requirements as they are fit the bill for what I would think a Canadian should be. What needs to change is the depth to which all applications are investigated. Fraudulent applications should be punished with criminal charges and deportation. Of course Canada is a big softie and so harsh punishment will never happen but that is what I would prefer, however; just because criminals can abuse a system, it doesn't mean that the system itself (immigration) is fundamentally broken. If a Canadian citizen is facilitating these scams then they too should be punished according to our criminal system but to reject legitimate immigrants from becoming citizens just because of fraudsters would be absurd. Out of curiousity, what requirements would you wish to change for potential Canadian citizens?

    Edit: I had forgotten about the Refugee Protection Act. You are right on that one. It is broken. Deportation should always remain an option.

    Edit2:
    "I fully agree with this. Nationality should always remain the same as when you were born, no matter where you are at any time. There is no point in calling yourself American when you were born in, let's say, India. People will always say "Oh, it's the Indian guy" (no jokes intended), so why not just go with the flow and call yourself Indian too? You ARE the one who was born in India, after all."

    I can't say I agree but I do say where you are coming from. One should always acknowledge their past. Where you came from is part of who you are but in Canada the way we see things is that just because you have become a Canadian citizen it doesn't mean you have to dispense with your past. The idea of the cultural mosaic encourages you to take the parts of your heritage with you and make that part of Canada; thus the defnition of a Canadian is everchanging. Of course one of the shortcomings of the mosaic is that it does tend to encourage the formation of entirely insular communities that don't interact outside of themselves...
     
  18. soulx
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    I would change the 3 year requirement to a 5 year period just to make sure the person is dedicated. I know this may be unfeasible but I think that the Canadian government should evaluate all potential citizens and how they would benefit the economy and Canada's overall well-being instead of bringing any random guy.
     
  19. sfunk

    Member sfunk GBAtemp Regular

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    No objections here on that count. When I was typing up my post I was thinking that too. In fact, I was under the impression, before I looked it up, that the requirement was 5 years but honestly, it doesn't make much of a difference. Someone trying to fake their way into the country could still do so regardless of that time limit. In the case you linked to he didn't even wait for 3 years to pass, he simply left as soon as he landed. Changing this to 5 wouldn't have prevented that case from happening.

    As for qualified immigrants: I do believe that Canada does use the point system for legitimate immigrants and thus stringent requirements need to be met before they are allowed in to the country. The exception to this is apparently marriage and the claming of refugee status. If you claim refugee status they are a lot more lenient with the rules (assuming your claim passes). Many people choose to abuse this generosity in order to force their way into the country. Eventually they just apply for citizenship once they become permanent residents. This is another loophole that needs closing.

    Here's the point system test: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/ski...ssess/index.asp

    It gives you some insight into what Canada is looking for when it picks legitimate immigrants.
     
  20. Jakob95

    Suspended Jakob95 I am the Avatar

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    Lots of my cousins were not born in America but they came here when they were the age 2 or younger. Does that mean they are Americans or not one of my cousins even came here when he was like 7 months? I was born in America but whenever someone asked me where am I from or what I am I never say I am american.
     

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