Permantly assigning an IP to my laptop

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by phoood, Feb 25, 2007.

Feb 25, 2007
  1. phoood
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    Member phoood taking it to a whole new level.

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    Well I do know a bit about networking, but not so much as how to do this.

    Since the laptop is shutdown every night, it's IP is changed every time I connect w/ a different pc first.
    This is annoying especially when I must have certain ports open for certain computers.

    The only solution I see is opening the same port for the IP's 192.168.1.40~47, but this isn't practical when I have to make changes.

    So how do I assign an IP permanently to a laptop on my network?
     
  2. Tomobobo

    Member Tomobobo Champion.

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    Here you go man. Set up your laptop to grab a static IP in the DHCP range. Say, 192.168.1.40. Just set it up to have the static IP be 192.168.1.40, subnet to be 255.255.255.0 and primary DNS as 192.168.1.1. This way, every time your lappy connects to your router, it'll grab the 192.168.1.40 addy, and you'll be happy.

    Or, you could set your DHCP leasing timeout to something like 1000000 hours or two weeks or however you can set it in your router firmware settings.
     
  3. Takrin

    Member Takrin GBAtemp Fan

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    yea disable obtain IP address automatically feature

    to do this goto My Computer>Control Panel>Network Connections>

    right click, open "Connection Properties" of your network device
    on "General" tab select "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)" then click Properties button
    Select "Use the following IP address"

    if field is unknown run command and type in "ipconfig /all" without the quotes and fill in stuff like DNS servers, Gateway, Subnet etc. then finally your ip address to your liking

    basicly try using the highest or least high enough so it wont get stolen by others.
    i have 30 ip address available, my PC has the 30th slot with my ports forwarded, then other pc is configured to get 20-29, DS, Wii, Tivo has dhcp enabled to fight over the beginning IPs heh. if you have static ip enabled but is in lower number, and if someone else logs on while your pc is off it will get stolen and wont work for you when you.
     
  4. DEF-

    Member DEF- GBAtemp Regular

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    Instead of fiddling around in windows, I would say its better to configure your router properly.

    To do this you need to setup your router/AP and PC accordingly to this:
    1. Activate DHCP server on your router.
    2. Activate DHCP on your computer, no static settings.
    3. Check your PC MAC with the command prompt (make sure you use the correct MAC if you have multiple NICs).
    4. There should be a list somewhere in your router settings (dont know what router brand you have) where you can connect your PC MAC to your prefered IP address. Check your router manual. If you have problems finding it, tell me what brand you have and I will look.

    By doing this your router will reserve your IP address and never give it out to any computer other then your PC with the coresponding MAC.

    This is alot better then doing a static setting on your PC.
    Why you may ask?
    1. You dont have to fiddle around with your IP settings if you take your laptop somewhere else where they use DHCP.
    2. If you set your laptop to 192.168.1.40 for example, your router could still give the IP to another computer if your laptop is shut off. Because your router will not know that it is set at a computer thats turned off (only happens if the leasing is out, but could still cause IP collisions). Sure the DHCP server should not give out an address that is already in use, but with cheap home routers I have seen this happen anyway.
    3. You have to set all your computers to use static IPs so #2 doesnt happen, this can also be a pain.

    It is much easier to setup your router with MAC to IP mapping instead.

    If you have any questions i'll be glad to help!

    Edit: Spelling

    Edit #2: Forgot that you can also exclude IP addresses from the DHCP server range to avoid #2, but it is still better to avoid static IP addresses if you bring your laptop to a place where they use other static settings or DHCP.
     
  5. Kyoji

    Member Kyoji ウッーウッーウマ

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    This command is "ipconfig -all"

    Hit start->Run->Type in "cmd"->hit ok->then type in "ipconfig -all".

    Physical Address = MAC
     
  6. DEF-

    Member DEF- GBAtemp Regular

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    Ahhh yes forgot to elaborate that hehe.. good thing you saved me [​IMG]
     
  7. phoood
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    Member phoood taking it to a whole new level.

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    I use a dsl modem (westell 6100; also works as a router) that came from my isp with a belkin F5D8230-4 (wireless router) I bought.

    You see deff, I have two routers so it would be impossible to forward ports that way. But the belkin router has a feature to use it strictly as an access point, so now I can [​IMG]. But that also means the belkin only has security features now. EDIT- IT also has MAC Address Control but I don't use that.

    The westell dosen't support mac control of anykind (MAC to IP mapping), so I need help.

    edit-your right, static ip isn't a viable solution. Would extending the lease time for DHCP to a gazillion years translate into reserving the ip for that long?
     
  8. DEF-

    Member DEF- GBAtemp Regular

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    Hm yeah multiple routers cause problems, especially with cheap home routers. I myself don't have problems with my sweet linux server [​IMG]

    Pitty that your router didn't support MAC to IP mapping, really ease things up. What you can do is to exclude an IP from the DHCP server address range, and set that IP on your laptop with static settings. Sure this might not be the best way, but it works [​IMG]

    Someone else talked about lease time, you should check that out. If you can set your DHCP server to hold IPs for a week or two this could also solve this problem. But then again this isn't either a good fix.

    Also there is a way in linux to setup your DHCP client to request a specific IP from the DHCP server first. Don't know if its possible in windows, but it should be. But then again all computers at your home would have to be setup to request specific IPs first to avoid problems. And if a friend uses your WLAN or something this could also cause problems.


    Anyway the ultimate solution is MAC to IP mapping. As you can't get that to work you can always try my suggestions above. But I guess the best way to solve it is to exclude an IP address from your DHCP server address range and use static settings on your laptop. Atleast this is what I can think of now.


    As always with networking its hard to explain everything you can do, so much easier if I could home to you and fix it [​IMG]
     

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