Hardware On my birthday i got a 4k lg monitor. Any ideas how to build a pc a round it, with a small budget?

clianvXAi

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On my birthday i got a 4k lg monitor. My setup is not that good, only i5 7400 Cpu 3ghz, 8 gb ram, 1060 3gb. The colors on my current monitor is way better than what i had, but still not a very big difference.

What should i upgrade for a better image on my monitor?

Also if i want to play games, what will be the best components (for single player campaign) to upgrade in a limited budget? Should i upgrade Gpu first ?

EDIT : Budget no more than 1000 dollars for whole setup, preferably btw 500-700 dollars. For gaming, i just want to play the newest titles from 2020-2021 like AC valhalla, RE Village. Tried them couple of months and my setup running very bad. With this new monitor, i want to play them, but it looks like i need an upgrade for all the components.

Thanks in advance.
 
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D34DL1N3R

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On my birthday i got a 4k lg monitor. My setup is not that good, only i5 7400 Cpu 3ghz, 8 gb ram, 1060 3gb. The colors on my current monitor is way better than what i had, but still not a very big difference.

What should i upgrade for a better image on my monitor?

Also if i want to play games, what will be the best components (for single player campaign) to upgrade in a limited budget? Should i upgrade Gpu first ?

Thanks in advance.

First off, if the color is all you are concerned about, no upgrade in GPU or CPU is going to improve that. Your best bet is to calibrate your monitor to the best of your ability. Not all tvs/monitors are accurate out of the box.

Now if you want to run games at higher framerates, with higher resolutions, and with higher in-game graphics settings, then you will want those upgrades (although they still won't improve the color). The next questions before anyone will be able to really help you are 1) What is it you are actually trying to do? Get better color or better gaming performance? 2) If better gaming performance, what is the actual amount of your limited budget?
 
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mightymuffy

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Like deadliner says 'with a small budget' is not particularly of much use to us if you want help - gpu-wise, a 1060 isn't that bad for 1080p gaming and gpu prices are still massively inflated: I don't think any gpu upgrade that offers good 4k performance for your new monitor will fall into whatever figure you have in mind for your small budget.. If you're ok with settling for 1440p instead, then you might be in luck (though I still doubt it with you using the word small)
A cpu upgrade, again we'd need to know the budget.
8gb ram though - is this dual channel or one slot? You'll get a nice boost with a second 8gb in there, alternatively 16gb of the fastest ram (that your mb can support) won't be as cheap, but a decent idea, going for 2x8gb sticks of course.
 
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clianvXAi

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First off, if the color is all you are concerned about, no upgrade in GPU or CPU is going to improve that. Your best bet is to calibrate your monitor to the best of your ability. Not all tvs/monitors are accurate out of the box.

Now if you want to run games at higher framerates, with higher resolutions, and with higher in-game graphics settings, then you will want those upgrades (although they still won't improve the color). The next questions before anyone will be able to really help you are 1) What is it you are actually trying to do? Get better color or better gaming performance? 2) If better gaming performance, what is the actual amount of your limited budget?

I think i was expecting that colors to be really amazing for 4k, but I guess because I never experienced any 4k tv/monitor in my life, my expectations were just unrealistic.

About gaming, i don’t know… i think i can afford max 1000 dollars for the whole upgrade.
 

D34DL1N3R

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I think i was expecting that colors to be really amazing for 4k, but I guess because I never experienced any 4k tv/monitor in my life, my expectations were just unrealistic.

About gaming, i don’t know… i think i can afford max 1000 dollars for the whole upgrade.

By this "color" thing, are you saying that things just don't "pop" like you thought they would going from 1080p to 4K? That could be a result of your monitor and/or monitor settings more than anything else. Have you tried using any simple brightness/contrast/color calibration images? What monitor do you have?
 

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By this "color" thing, are you saying that things just don't "pop" like you thought they would going from 1080p to 4K? That could be a result of your monitor and/or monitor settings more than anything else. Have you tried using any simple brightness/contrast/color calibration images? What monitor do you have?
No, the only thing i did was to use HDR setting from Windows 10, which made it look better.

LG 27UL500-W 27-Inch UHD
 

D34DL1N3R

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No, the only thing i did was to use HDR setting from Windows 10, which made it look better.

LG 27UL500-W 27-Inch UHD

I'd at least get your black levels set properly if they aren't already set properly out of the box. Doesn't hurt to check. http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/black.php

As far as upgrades go, there isn't really anything new that you can upgrade to right now for $1k that would be worth it due to pricing. Even a used 1080 ti is still going for $500-$600+ and used standard 2060's are around $500. Both would be a pretty big upgrade from a 3GB 1060, but they also are not anywhere near a 3080/ti. Upgrading your GPU though to even the two I mentioned would require a CPU upgrade as well - or else your i5 7400 will cause a pretty good bottleneck. I'd most likely put in another 8GB ram first, then decide on a CPU that will be a match for whatever GPU you decide to get.
 
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notimp

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Agree with everything that was posted.

To get a better image, you'd actually should try to get into calibrating it.

Your monitor is 98% sRGB only - which in my book is actually a good thing. But it also means, that its not HDR capable and it doesnt have wide color gamut.

So lets talk about calibrating it correctly. :)

Turn off HDR. (Sorry to tell you. ;) ) HDR on your monitor would actually "overdrive" medium saturated colors and make them look more saturated, but, alongside a wrong gamma curve your monitor doesnt use (by default, more on that later), probably washing the entire image out.

rtings sadly only reviewed the 32inch variant of your monitor (sadly, because panels used can vary widely in characteristics, between different size versions), but there are a few things we can do. :)

First - make sure full/limited color range is set correctly. To do that open up your graphics card control panel (i.e. nVidia controll panel) and navigate to the tab, wehre you would change your resolution.

Normally its recommended to set signal source to RGB and FULL in there. And as high bit rate as your (cable (seriously) and or graphics card(/output)) support - for that framerate. Meaning, if you opt for 240Hz (just an example, your monitor probably would not allow you to set that), bit rate might have to be lower to still be able to get a signal and not a black screen. Same goes for chroma. 4:4:4 is best - but if you have to use 4:2:2 (reduces "bitrate") its still not a major issue.

Once you've set your signal path to RGB (full - as in if there is a limited option, chose full instead) open your monitors control panel, and find the corresponding color range setting (to set accordingly) there.

You are looking for a setting (maybe named Blacklevel, or something entirely different.. ;) ) that has two options, full(or high) and limited(or low) (and maybe auto). In the display options of your monitor. Set it to full(/high) as well.

Have the Lagcom black level test open at the same time. http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/black.php
--

Insert. At that stage, also try setting your graphics card in the nVidia control panel on the resolution screen to output YCbCr and limited, and then set the monitor to limited (in the monitor settings). See if the black level changes significantly (IMPORTANT: Only "judge" full/full (set both in the graphics card control panel and monitor settings) vs limited/limited (set both in the graphics card control panel and monitor settings), dont judge full/limited, or limited/full. If the black level doesnt change significantly (as in black doesnt become "deeper" using one setting compared to the other -- stay with (RGB) full/full.

I'm mentioning this here, because on my LG monitor - for some reason using a full/full signal path, leads to elevated blacks, meaning, for me it makes sense to stick to limited/limited. Thats a bug btw (on the monitor side). dont expect to see it. Just know, that if you do, its better to stay with the signal path, that gives you the deeper black level.
--

You should have the lagcom.nl black level test open at the same time to be able to judge it easier.

Ideally it would allow you to differenciate all greys close to black, but dont worry if it clips out a few of them (a few of them are undistinguishable from black) this is influenced by display brightness, gamma, and your room lighting conditions, and two of those you are setting later, but first we need to make sure, that you dont have a limited/full or full/limited mismatch between your graphics cards settings panel and your monitor settings. Which would result in either _many_ of the close to black fields in the lagcom test crushing (being not distinguishable from black) or in a _very_ washed out image (elevated black level).

So your job is to make sure that you either have set RGB full (nVidia control panel) and the monitor on full/high (setting probably named black level, or similar) -- or YCbCr limited (nVidia Controlpanel) and the monitor on limited/low. But no mix of limited/full or full/limited.

Also, if blacks dont become "deeper" using either full/full or limited/limited, use full/full preferably.
--

The next steps are setting some additional settings - following the rtings test of the 32 inch model:

https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/lg/32ul500-w

On the Monitor:

Set picture mode to custom.
Set gamma to Gamma 2
Set Luminance (probably named brightness) to 18 (default probably was 55)
Set contrast to 68 (default probably was 70)
Set sharpness to 50 (== default, lower would blur the image, more would sharpen it.)

Then the only thing left to set are RGB values (whitepoint). For that you can use the test images on https://harlekin.me/burosch -
look at them and see if raising green from 50 to 60 makes them look more natural. This is the only setting where you likely have to guess or go by feel, because the rtings test only tested the 32 inch model of that monitor, and whitepoint is the most likely setting to change between panels (different manufaturing runs) - so we cant say for sure if this benefits your calibration, or not.

(The other settings are more likely to be driven by the chipset used in those monitors and would likely be the same on different screen size versions of the same monitor model.)

rtings settings for the 32 inch version of the monitor are 45-60-48 (red-green-blue) (default: 50-50-50). -5 red you probably would notice the least, +10 green you'd definitely notice, and -2 blue you'd notice as well. So use the test images, and try to judge if raising green by 10 ticks makes them look more natural. :)

Thats it.

Turn off any "black level enhancers" (== dynamic contrast, if your monitor has them, off might not be 0 but rather 45 or 50 (*sigh*)), and "super resolution+" mode (smudges the image, then adds edge sharpening, might be nice for some movies, but not for PC work, adds lag).

You can (and should) then turn up/down brightness as you'd want again, but notice that 18 is the "standard" setting for the sRGB standard (100 nits) on your monitor. What brightness setting you'd need ultimately depends on your roomlight settings. But dont feel the need to turn it to 50. 18 is closer to the default than all other settings. Manufacturers just like to pump it in default settings, because it sells monitors (look - this one is brighter!), in showrooms under halogen lighting.
--

If you want to be more thorough, you need a meter (xrite i1d3 (== X-Rite i1Display Pro) preferably - you can buy them used (used is fine) for less than 200 USD). With that you'd be able to calibrate RGB (whitepoint) correctly - but all other settings probably would not change.

Also - and thats new - you could use that to generate a 3DLUT profile for windows ( https://hub.displaycal.net/forums/topic/i-made-a-tool-for-applying-3d-luts-to-the-windows-desktop/ ), upside: perfect colors, downside +10% points more GPU usage in games. :)

With a 3D lut you could also use any gamma curve you'd want. (Thats just the resolve of the "more on that later" comment, made earlier.. ;) )

Thats mostly useful if your monitor is wide color gamut and doesnt allow you to adjust the sRGB profile. (99% of all internet and even gaming content still is sRGB (everything thats not authored for HDR is), which basically is the same as rec709 (standard for Blurays, just not HDR Bluerays) (gamma for Bluerays is "darker", so when watching a movie, you might want to switch through your gamma options on your monitor and see if you prefer a gamma setting that makes the movie "darker". For PC work (and internet content) Gamma 2 on your monitor is correct.) )) But yours is not wide color gamut (the thing aside from high brightness - you need for a "HDR compatible monitor") - and does allow you to adjust it, so its not as necessary for you.

If you want to go that route - you need to buy a i1d3 and then ping me again, its not hard - but you need an additional howto. :)
--

Thats it. :)
 
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notimp

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And post what that settings (high/low) name in your monitor was in your case. :) Just so we can verify that its the correct one. :)

Sadly all Monitor/TV manufacturers name it differently. Black level, Color Range, ...

The other way to identify if you have found the correct one, is to see if toggling it (to a mismatch state so either PC full/ Monitor limited or PC limited/ Monitor full) crushes near blacks on the lagcom.nl test (makes them black), or washes out the entire image (one ore the other, depending on if your PC outputs limited, or full - not both. :) ). If it does, you've found the right setting on your monitor.. ;)

edit: Also if you find a setting in your LG monitor, you are unsure about, just ask. I also have a LG monitor and an LG Oled, and should be able to explain what they do. :)


edit: One more thing, for perceptual matching - (looking at image, change whitepoint by feel), another thing you could do would be to have a friend with a rather current Macbook Air come over. Late 2018 and later models. They also have sRGB screens (no wide color gamut), and are pretty well calibrated out of the factory.

Starting from the next generation they might have wide color gamut screens as well, so do it now.. ;)

Then just have them visit the /burosch link as well full screen the images, go into monitor settings on the mac and (for the time) disable Nightshift and automatic brightness adjustment. Then bring brightness on the Macbook Air up to a level that matches the monitor on 18. And then start setting R G and B levels (whitepoint) on the monitor by visually matching the two screens.

Perceptual color matching should be done by compairing 90 IRE grey (almost pure white - as in, in one of those greyscale ramps (from black to white), the field one down from pure white), or skincolors. Those are the most "neutral ones". (Meaning - impacting most other colors uniformly.)

Saves you 200 USD for a meter - if you have a friend with a Macbook Air.. ;)
 
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