Need help with Soldering Iron

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by Gizametalman, Dec 3, 2016.

  1. Gizametalman
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    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Heya, I have a Soldering Gun... kind of... like a pistol. I bought it in a flea market a year ago. Today I was attempting to fix my Headphones, but my Soldering Gun didn't got hot, so I un-screw it, opened it and "fixed it".
    Now the Iron of my Soldering Gun is getting RED HOT (like really really RED)
    Do I have to worry about that? Or is it... normal?

    Asking here because I think that some of you are into soldering and hardmodding stuff.

    BY "FIX" I MEAN THIS:
    -Unscrew the screws
    -Took part the plastic carcase
    -Then I pressed everything in place
    -Re-assembled the carcase
    -Screwed it again
     
    Last edited by Gizametalman, Dec 3, 2016
  2. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    It shouldn't get red hot. Is it the copper tip that is getting to hot? Im assuming you either have to thin of a copper tip, or you messed something up on the inside. When they don't heat up it's almost always a bad connection with the tip. Also that is the wrong type of soldering iron for electronics. The gun type is for working on thick wire like house wiring, although you don't really solder house wiring. Just get a cheap 30 watt iron. Sometimes you can find them at the dollar store. Buy some thin silver solder. Lead solder melts faster but is harder to find because the led is bad for you. I recommend buying a bottle of liquid reson flux instead of solder with a reson core. Get a toothpick and brush a small amount of flux on each wire that you want to join. Touch the tip of the iron to the wire, then a second or two later touch the solder to the wire while still holding the iron to it. The solder should flow where you brushed the flux. This is called tinning the wire. Now brush some more flux to each piece of wire you are wanting to join again. A helping hand works great for this part, but you can get creative also. You want to then take the ends of the two wires and slightly overlap them so that they are touching. Just touch the Iron to them until the solder flows. The remove the iron. They should be joined. If the soldered joint looks dull then reflow it again until it looks shiny. Never hold the iron to anything that you are soldering any longer than you have to. You might be able to use the gun, but you will prolly melt the wires. Headphone wires are extremely hard to solder. Most of the time they are made from very thin braided wire that just does not except solder very well. You might be able to do it without liquid flux and just with a resin core solder, but liquid flux is much easier. ALWAYS brush flux on anything you want to solder first.
     
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  3. Gizametalman
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    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Yes... I use flux... though I didn't knew it was called like that in english (In spanish is: Pasta)
    I do have one of those "cheap" soldering irons... but it doesn't work properly. Is the one that you have to let plugged in order to get hot. But I had leave it plugged for 15mins and it doesn't melt my solder.
    I use the Soldering Gun because my solder is "quite" bold... like 1mm in thickness.
    I do know how to solder. And I also take all the precautions possibles (like wearing Googles, and a mask in order to not breath the smoke)

    I've fixed many headphones with that soldering gun, It's just that today wasn't getting hot, and suddenly is glowing red.
    So... that's not risky? I timed it and it gets red after 20 secs of pressing the trigger, before I had to press it for half-minute to get it warm.
     
    Last edited by Gizametalman, Dec 3, 2016
  4. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    Take the tip out of the cheap iron and sand it until it is very clean. Put it back in and it should get hot. You should use very thin solder for electronics because it melts faster.
     
  5. Gizametalman
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    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    It's brand new. Since it never melted the Iron I ddin't used it anymore.
    Which "thickness" do you recomend me for electronics?
     
  6. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    . 002 it will melt that just fine. The thinner the better for electronics.
     
  7. Gizametalman
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    Gizametalman GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    thanks for helping :)
     
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  8. 6adget

    6adget Advanced Member

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    I hope it really helped. Remember, if your 30 watt iron doesn't melt your solder, then the solder is to thick. Do yourself a favor and buy a bottle of liquid resin flux. It is sooo much easier that way. The flux cleans the part you are about to solder and helps the solder to stick better. If the part doesn't have flux on it, then it will be very hard to do. The solder with the resin fux in the middle doesn't work very well at all. Anyone who says the resin cor solder works just fine has never used the liquid kind. Let us know how it worked out for you.