Max Operating Temperature Of Radeon HD 7000 Series?

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by Dradynosagequa, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. Dradynosagequa
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    Dradynosagequa Member

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    For some reason, this information seem rather difficult to acquire. There's not even an exact figure on AMD's product page. Does anyone have any information on this? Or even any personal experience about that these cards can take in terms of temperatures.

    My card is a Radeon HD 7790 btw. Factory OCed. The card runs great so far, but coming from an Nvidia card, I'm not sure what temps to look for.
     
  2. DinohScene

    DinohScene Feed Dino to the Sharks

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    GPU's used to run hotter then CPU's

    Just keep the temps below 70 and you're fine.
     
  3. ilman

    ilman Gbatemp's Official Noise Eraser

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    I had a 7610m, which, after testing (don't ask why), shut itself down upoin reaching 100 degrees Celsius. Since that's a laptop GPU, yours should be able to withstand even bigger temps than that one. But, as Dinoh said, try to keep it below 70.
     
  4. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    Don't let it hit past 80C.
     
  5. aiat_gamer

    aiat_gamer GBAtemp Fan

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    Why do people keep obsessing about this? Just leave it be, if the temperature goes to dangerous levels you would know (Your pc would shut down) and then you can worry about it!
     
  6. trumpet-205

    trumpet-205 Embrace the darkness within

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    If you overclock, you would care about temperature. One to make sure not to overheat, and two to keep voltage bumping as low as possible. By keeping temperature low, you can use less voltage bump while overclock, which in turn reduce the rate of electromigration. Faster the rate of electromigration, shorter the lifespan your CPU/GPU has.

    Actually I'd be very worry at 100C. No way any consumer chip can withstand 100C. 90C is really the max before chip starts to suffer permanent damage.