IT starting points and questions about certifications

Discussion in 'General Off-Topic Chat' started by Bridgy84, Sep 27, 2008.

  1. Bridgy84
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    Member Bridgy84 Yub Nub

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    I am soon going to be looking to finally getting into IT jobs like i always should have. I am currently living in Michigan where if you read about this sorta thing jobs blow. I am in about a month going to move to Virginia for a number of reason one being the availability of these sorts of jobs, especially of the starting variety. I do have a high school degree and some college. I have a very good understanding of computers windows and networks. I want to begin to work on getting certifications and finish up school and all that. I have already began to apply for jobs as well. What i want to know is what the pecking order should be for certifications and what i can be doing on my own to make sure i am able to first get a job and ultimately make a successful career out of this. Thanks in advance for any help in this question i trust this community to help me in this endeavor.

    sorry about the semi wall of text!!!
     
  2. Bridgy84
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    Member Bridgy84 Yub Nub

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    Anyone able to help!!
     
  3. FAST6191

    Reporter FAST6191 Techromancer

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    My qualifications are precisely zero but I am still in IT (regular engineering is all but dead) although my entry was a friends of friends approach.

    None the less you appear to want network/admin type jobs which is a bit nicer than development jobs (especially web development).

    Qualifications are a tough one.
    On the one hand your CV* will have to be read by those not in IT and the same CV will be read by those in IT and you have to try and please both; as an IT person MCSE means you can probably tie your shoes but a "Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer" means much more to someone outside IT.
    A+ certification is still worth doing.
    Avoid like the plague those "become an IT technician and earn $80k a year" qualifications you see on TV. I have not been in the east of the US but they are everywhere in Europe and the western US.
    College/university, odd as I would say you need it to be an IT person but some places will not take anything less. A+ and the like are almost equivalents.
    Even if it is not software development try and put together a portfolio of sorts "I wired this network up; it needed.....".

    As a quick aside even if it sounds very stupid in the current IT climate try and downplay any interest you have in IT but any IT jobs you do try and get in there (experience is coming back into vogue). Charities are often in dire need of a bit of IT help (a straw poll of various FTP sites would seem to indicate that) so if you knock on their door then something can happen on the experience front (not to mention you have just worked your way through school).
     
  4. porchemasi

    Member porchemasi GBAtemp Regular

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    Im also studying IT at the university level. I would also love to know which certifications i should start taking after i graduate so i can have a head over other people looking for jobs

    approx time till graduation ~2 more years of university
     
  5. FAST6191

    Reporter FAST6191 Techromancer

    pip
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    What form of IT; development and if so web/windows/unix/high level (user interface stuff)/low level (embedded firmwares and high performance code)/something else, network administration.... and does it give any outside qualifications (see my post above)?

    As I mentioned experience is what everyone is after these days so something dead end during that time is always good to get.

    You say approx 2 more years: is this a 3 year course, a 4 year course, part time (in which case you are very close to a full degree as far as learning goes).

    Other than that it is take what you can and switching jobs is worth it (more than a few people I have met are so happy to finally get something they do not want to switch). On the other hand most companies will have to "train" graduates (even if nothing is actually done) so giving the impression you will leave easily is not a good idea.
     
  6. Bridgy84
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    Member Bridgy84 Yub Nub

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    I personally am more interested in networks and the hardware side of it all. I hate, hate, hate, programing like the plague.
     

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