How do i overclock my Intel Pentium III EB?

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware, Devices and Accessories' started by SavageWaffle, Jul 19, 2008.

Jul 19, 2008
  1. SavageWaffle
    OP

    Member SavageWaffle GBAtemp Maniac

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    So, my computer(since i had it) was the slowest computer i ever owned. So, i was playing GTA SA, was lagging in some parts(when im about to shoot like a UZi, or fire a pistol even). The processor on my computer(From CPUZ) is a Intel Pentium III EB, went on wikipedia, said it was released 199(holy crap) and has 800 Mhz. So i wana overclock it =P.

    Can you help me?

    EDIT:
    Is there some sorta program? =P
     
  2. fischju

    Member fischju Rehabilitated Jaywalker

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    Nobody tell him how to do this.
     
  3. Westside

    Member Westside Sogdiana

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    QFT. I suggest you not to overclock that guy. Not only is more than half of it's life already used, but every minute that it is over clocked, it's life is reduced dramatically. CPU back then were not meant for overclocking...
     
  4. xcalibur

    Member xcalibur Gbatemp's Chocolate Bear

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    Well I'm glad I'm not the new urza anymore.
    Now I'm not under any pressure to vocalize the sheer stupidity of the OP in a particularly nasty but witty comment.

    Pentium 3's suck and even if you go and overclock it to astronomical lenghts, the gains it would bring you are extremely limited and are outweighed massively by the cons which include shorter battery life, system instability and the danger of spontaneous combustion.

    Computer these days require at least a minimum of a P4 to run comfortably but I have to say that even my P4 fails me once in a while during HD playback or other CPU-intensive tasks where it takes far too long.
    The only logical solution would be to hurry the hell up with that new PC you're buying.

    If you really want to know, ask your grandparents.
     
  5. Richy Freeway

    Member Richy Freeway GBAtemp Advanced Fan

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    Just bump the FSB up a little at a time and see what she can handle. Monitor the CPU temp and hammer it with Orthos to check for stability.

    You might reduce the life of it a little, but it's lasted 10 years already so there's no reason it won't last another 10 overclocked as long as it's kept cooled well.
     
  6. FAST6191

    Reporter FAST6191 Techromancer

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    You have had the warnings and furthermore those P3's ran really hot (it was part of the reason for the P4 coming out relatively quickly) and as mentioned overclocking can drop the life of a CPU somewhat (if you keep it cool though then it should be OK, search for electromigration as that is the most common cause of failure and not helped at all by heat).

    There are two methods
    Front side bus clockspeed and multiplier changing. Intel general does not allow multipliers to be changed on anything but the most expensive of their range which leaves you with FSB.
    Secondly if this is a branded (dell, HP, time, acer.....) machine they usually sell the machine with a seriously stripped down BIOS that prevents overclocking (one of the many reasons I build machines for people).
    Occasionally they also allow BIOS upgrades to allow tweaking and "hidden" BIOS tweaking screens but I would not count on it.
    GUI programs are not going to happen for such an old machine.

    Still the frontside bus (henceforth FSB). This ultimately controls the ram and the CPU speed (modern machines allow an unlinked mode but a increase in older machines affects them both hence people suggesting good ram for overclocking (I suggest good ram for all machines but that is besides the point).
    Increasing this increases the clockspeed.

    Voltages. Transistors work by creating an electric field and attracting or repelling charge carriers depending on transistor type which takes time (the distance across stuff that has to be changed is what gives you the 90nm,130nm, 65nm.... measurements you might see with chips), higher speeds mean there may not be enough to time to get the carriers there and the chip will crash (just one hiccup can take things down). A higher voltage means a larger field and shorter response time.
    A higher voltage also means a higher temperature (see first paragraph) which means it needs more cooling. Trying to find more/better than stock cooling for a machine as old as that these days (assuming you do not want to mod/make stuff and frankly if you have to ask this question making cooling is probably not something I would suggest right away) will probably be about as expensive as a decent second hand machine.

    Ram timings. Assuming you can not run in unlinked mode the ram will have a set of timings associated with it (probably 2.5, 2, 3,10 or something similar). These refer to various things but faster speeds mean you up the voltage (with above problems) or lower the timings (making for a slower machine owing to the now slower ram). Again vendors do not like people doing this and usually block it.

    As already mentioned those older machines do not overclock well (especially the P3, AMD was the king of overclocking during that time and up to the core2 line really). This together means your 800MHz machine will probably be lucky to hit 880MHz (more than 10% is practically unheard of outside of the liquid nitrogen/helium circles).
     
  7. MrN !

    Newcomer MrN ! Member

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    But the keypoint to take away from all these replies is, ANY overclock you get out of that is still going to be a VERY bad experience for games.
    The cheapest modern cpu/motherboard upgrade you do will net 2-3x performance.
     
  8. SavageWaffle
    OP

    Member SavageWaffle GBAtemp Maniac

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    Ok, so your saying dont do it cause it will kill my cpu?
     
  9. arctic_flame

    Member arctic_flame GBAtemp ATMEGA8 Fan

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    We're saying it's a waste of effort, and the risks outweigh the gain (Which would be very little anyway)

    A new motherboard/CPU/computer would be a better way of increasing gaming performance.
     

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