How can I use mor of my HDD to speed up my computer?

Discussion in 'Computer Games and General Discussion' started by drakorex, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. drakorex
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    drakorex GBAtemp Advanced Maniac

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    I bought a 1.5 TB HDD, and I want to use ready boost to speed up my laptop, but the most I can utilize is 4GB. Is there any way to make it use more?
     
  2. twiztidsinz

    twiztidsinz Taiju Yamada Fan

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    You can use Ready Boost on a Harddrive? .....weird. I didn't think it was possible.

    But something like that already exists, it's called a Swap Partition or Virtual Memory.
    And I would think that using both would actually cause a performance DEcrease since now your drive has to look in 3 places (reading the data, reading/writing the virtual memory and now reading/writing the Ready Boost).
    Harddrives are also considerably slower than RAM so using Virtual Memory isn't as good.
     
  3. FireEmblemGuy

    FireEmblemGuy Finally hit 1000 posts

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    Isn't ReadyBoost only for external or flash memory? Also, if you're still running Vista, the max amount is 4GB; if you're on Win7 and it's still only letting you use 4GB, I dunno.

    Regardless, if your laptop is performing sluggishly, try defragging the drive the OS is on, run CCleaner, and maybe look at upgrading your RAM.
     
  4. Joe88

    Joe88 [λ]

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    thats because its 32bit, 64bit vista allows 128GB depending on which version you have
    that 4GB limit will follow you around regardless of what OS you go till unless you switch to a 64bit
     
  5. Mazor

    Mazor Z80 master arch

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    Except the limit is actually ~3GB (varying a bit).
     
  6. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    As stated, no. What you're thinking of (using HDD space as RAM) already happens automatically, and it's the CAUSE of slowdown, and the reason having more RAM speeds things up, because it prevents that slowdown.
     
  7. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    Isn't that exactly what the page file is? A reserved section of the HDD to store non time dependant instructions/data?
     
  8. Joe88

    Joe88 [λ]

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    the limit is actually determined by your graphics card memory
    on paper though its listed as 4GB

    majority of cases though it 3.2-3.5GB limit
     
  9. Jugarina

    Jugarina GBAtemp Fan

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    Yup I read that If you have a good deal of physical ram and you disable your swap file It makes the Windows speed run like a super computer on steroids.
     
  10. doyama

    doyama GBAtemp Maniac

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    There are a few things limiting it on a laptop. You are correct that one limitation is that the onboard video cards of many laptops suck memory away from the main memory. However Windows has limitations as well running in 32-bit. There's a chunk of memory that's reserved even on workstations with dedicated video cards. It's basically similar to how your 1.5TB drive 'really' only has 1.2-1.3TB once you format it.
     
  11. doyama

    doyama GBAtemp Maniac

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    There is really only a few ways you can speed up a laptop. In order of best solutions to worst

    1) Buy more RAM. This is by far the best cost-performance benefit you will see. Laptop memory is more expensive, but you will see dramatic increases in speed just by ensuring you don't go to the page file when you load the 50th tab in Firefox to watch more porn. 4GB is best, but even if you get to 2GB you will see a lot of improvements.

    2) Do a system wipe. Other than people who have so many viruses and such, usually the system is just OLD when they complain its slow. Try to upgrade to Windows 7 if you can as its much better than XP especially on a laptop. Waking from hibernation is faster and more consistent with Windows 7.

    3) SSD hard disk. You'll see 'some' benefits with this but I don't honestly think the cost is worth the tiny benefits. If the laptop is more than 3 years old then don't bother as the CPU is probably limiting you more than anything else.
     
  12. Rydian

    Rydian Resident Furvert™

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    That's a different concept, harddrive makers measure units by 1000 while OSes tend to use 1024.

    1.5TB in manufacturer terms is 1,500,000,000,000 bytes.
    Break those units down by 1024...
    1,464,843,750 kilobytes.
    1,430,511 megabytes.
    1,396 gigabytes.
    1.36 terabytes.
     
  13. Chhotu uttam

    Chhotu uttam DOH HO HO HO

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    you should not use it as ready boost for rams.they get heat up fast and can't handle for a long time
     
  14. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    ...I'm not sure exactly what you're referring to by "it" and "they", but Ready Boost should not cause anything to heat up any more than normal use would.

    On a related note, are you posting in every topic for the sake of posting (getting your post count up) or for actual contributions? So far it seems like the former.
     
  15. Chhotu uttam

    Chhotu uttam DOH HO HO HO

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    most of us use the computer for internet only and that too for a long time.If he uses his hdd for more than 3hrs you can't say what wil happen.

    I use mine for atleast 2 1/2 hrs and i was much heated that it never again responded for any computer.
    It was a segate goflex 1tb
     
  16. raulpica

    raulpica With your drill, thrust to the sky!

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    Lol, I've got enough RAM, and I've disabled the swap file entirely, but most certainly my PC doesn't run like it's on steroids [​IMG]

    It's a bit faster, though, I guess.
     
  17. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    I'm not surprised to hear that a SeaGate HDD died. It's just about the only thing I ever hear about their drives. That doesn't mean drives should not be used for more than 3 hours though. Some people never turn their computers off, and yet their drives are in normal working order. I myself usually use the computer for stretches of 4-12 hours at a time, and whilst every now and again I hear the secondary drive spin up (it contains games and bulk data like pictures and movies), the SMART readings for both my drives are very healthy.

    Whilst it is true that excessive heat can indrectly cause damage to the drive (it causes the bearings to wear down faster, but even that is due to vibration more than heat), most drives will not overheat unless they are in a case with very bad airflow and an overheating graphics card (I had to fix a computer a few weeks ago where this was exactly what happened... and it was another SeaGate HDD that died).
     
  18. Chhotu uttam

    Chhotu uttam DOH HO HO HO

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    ya but the probability is that 60 out of 40 times the hdd dies up
     
  19. Originality

    Originality Chibi-neko

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    I call B$ (not just because you're not specific in what "that" refers to, which I'm starting to feel might be because english is not your first language, but also because it just sounds like you're wrong). Prove it (or at least explain what would cause "60 out of 40 (150% failure rate is an impossible statistic) times" for the HDD to die).
     
  20. twiztidsinz

    twiztidsinz Taiju Yamada Fan

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    First off, '60 out of 40 times' is LITERALLY a statistic impossibility.
    Second, 'the hdd dies up'? What?